November 29 2011 facilitated by dr heather sheridan thomas tst boces network team
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November 29, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Heather Sheridan-Thomas TST BOCES Network Team . Lead Evaluator of Teachers Training: Session 3. Workshop Objectives: SESSION 3 Participants will: . Practice observation skills, focusing on: Evidence collection & self-check

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November 29, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Heather Sheridan-Thomas TST BOCES Network Team

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November 29 2011 facilitated by dr heather sheridan thomas tst boces network team

November 29, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Heather Sheridan-ThomasTST BOCES Network Team

Lead Evaluator of Teachers Training: Session 3

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Workshop objectives session 3 participants will

Workshop Objectives: SESSION 3Participants will:

  • Practice observation skills, focusing on:

    • Evidence collection & self-check

    • Alignment of evidence with Standards & Domains

    • Asking clarifying questions to promote professional reflection & growth

    • Leveling the teacher’s performance based on a rubric

    • Begin discussion of Post-Observation discussions with teachers

    • Begin discussion of sharing this information with teachers.

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Session 3 agenda

Session 3 AGENDA

  • Observation Practice

    • Scripting, Checking, Categorizing

    • Asking Clarifying Questions

    • Leveling the Performance Based on a Rubric

  • Post-observation Conferences

  • Sharing Shifts in Instructional Expectations of the Rubrics with Teachers

  • Wrap Up & Evaluation

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


November 29 2011 facilitated by dr heather sheridan thomas tst boces network team

Priorities of the Rubrics

  • Cognitive Engagement

    • “Effective” = students must be cognitivelyengaged

    • “Highly Effective” = cognitive engagement PLUS meta-cognition and student ownership of their learning

  • Constructivist Learning

    • Effective and Highly Effective = evidence of learning experiences designed to facilitate students’ construction of knowledge & connections to prior knowledge.

  • 21st Century Skills

    • Effective and Highly Effective = evidence of application of 21st Century college & career-readiness skills and dispositions

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

4


Framework vocabulary

Framework Vocabulary

Standard 1: Planning and Preparation

Component 1a. Demonstrating knowledge of content and pedagogy

A) Knowledge of content and structure of the discipline

B) Knowledge of prerequisite relationships

C) Knowledge of content-related pedagogy

Domains

Components

Elements

With rubrics

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Observing practice

Observing Practice

  • Observe the video, with an eye to the priorities of the rubrics.

  • Collect evidence, with a focus on:

    • Danielson = 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e

  • Be prepared to self-check your evidence, categorize it and discuss your categories with a partner

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Checking evidence

Checking Evidence

  • Use the self-check questions to review your evidence collection

    • Have I recorded only facts?

    • Is my evidence relevant to the criteria being examined?

    • Whenever possible, have I quantified words such as few, some, and most?

    • Have I used quotation marks when quoting a teacher or student?

    • Does my selection or documentation of evidence indicate any personal or professional preferences? 

    • Have I included any opinion (in the guise of fact)?

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Observing practice sorting evidence

Observing Practice: Sorting Evidence

  • Sort your evidence so that it aligns with the appropriate component in the rubric.

  • Using the placemat version of the rubric, write a component (3a, 3d etc.) next to each piece of evidence you have written down.

  • Do on your own & discuss with a partner.

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Observing practice clarifying questions

Observing Practice: Clarifying Questions

  • With a partner, develop clarifying questions you have about the lesson you observed that you would like to have answered before you rate the teacher’s performance.

  • Be sure to review your questions in light of the reminders.

Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Clarifying question reminders

Clarifying Question Reminders

  • Be sure to frame your questions to ensure that they are designed to promote a climate of professional inquiry

  • Consider the following:

    • How does the question make you feel?

    • How might the teacher respond to the question?

  • Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Leveling teacher performance

    Leveling Teacher Performance

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    The evidence cycle

    The Evidence Cycle

    COLLECTDATA

    (Evidence)

    SORT TO

    ALIGN

    WITH YOUR

    FRAMEWORK

    Interpret:

    Clarify

    Conclusions

    Impact on learning…

    Support needed…

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Leveling practice

    Leveling Practice

    • On your own, assign a level to the teaching performance we just watched for the following components/elements:

      • Danielson = 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e

    • Use the rubric provided to circle or shade your chosen levels and write at least one piece of evidence for component/element you leveled.

    • Share your level with a partner, providing evidence to support your level choices.

    • As a table, reach consensus on levels for the following components/elements: 2b, 3b , 3c


    Post observation discussion

    Post-Observation Discussion

    “[The] essential message is not, “You are broken and I am here to fix you.” Rather[the] message is “You are so valuable and

    worthy, our mission is so vital, and the future

    lives of our students are so precious, that we

    have a joint responsibility to one another...”

    Doug Reeves,

    from Leading Change in Your Schools

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    When is feedback most effective

    When is Feedback Most Effective?

    • When it…

       Helps inform a professional dialogue

       Is based on evidence gathered from observations and other data

       Prompts self-evaluation

       Deepens the teacher’s learning and professional development

    • From: A-Z Coaching. National Union of Teachers


    Differentiated supervision

    Differentiated Supervision

    • Non-directiveCollaborative

      • Listening, clarifying, reflecting, problem-solving

    • Directive- InformationalDirective

      • Directing, reinforcing, problem-solving, negotiating

      • Model developed by Glickman, Gordan and Ross-Gordan

    Perry R. Rettig, Scherie Lampe, and Penny Garcia. “Supervising Your Faculty with a Differentiated Model.” The Department Chair 11(2) (fall 2000): 1–21.


    Teacher reflection post conference discussions

    Teacher Reflection & Post- Conference Discussions

    • Engage teachers in discussing how their instructional moves/decisions impacted student learning.

    • Engage teachers in reflecting on lesson strengths and what they might change.

    • Use “mediational questions” (see handout) to guide teachers toward reflection.

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Teacher reflection post conference discussions1

    Teacher Reflection & Post- Conference Discussions

    • Provide possible questions to teachers ahead of time (see handout – Forms D)

    • Possibly suggest a target area for reflection/ discussion based on a particular rubric component/element (by focusing question # 7).

    • Your thoughts? Talk to a partner and we will share out briefly.

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Possible format for brief directed feedback

    Possible Format for BriefDirected Feedback

     Thank you

     3 “keepers” (student focused)

     The students ______ because you _______

     1 “polisher” (student focused)

     It’s important that students __________; in order to do that, try______

    c.

    c.


    Providing feedback keepers 3

    Providing Feedback: Keepers (3)

     What: Student Focused

    The students ______ because you _______

     Why:

    • 3:1 ratio is critical to promoting positive and responsive school culture

    • Increases the likelihood that teachers will sustain effective practices

    • Builds rapport

    • Increases likelihood teacher will hear and respond to “polisher”


    Providing feedback polisher 1

    Providing Feedback: Polisher (1)

    What: Student Focused

     It’s important that students __________; in order to do that, try________

    Why:

     Limits focus for growth to manageable number of tasks

     Provides clear teacher practice to improve instruction

     Provides rationale for implementing recommendation

     Links rationale to student outcomes (keeps focus on students)


    Sharing rubric expectations with teachers

    Sharing Rubric Expectations with Teachers

    1. Consider using the “Wow Factor” activity below, much as we did in Session 1:

    If you were to observe an excellent teacher, either in the classroom or another professional setting, what might you see or hear that would cause you to think that you were in the presence of an expert? What would make you think, “Wow, this is good! If I had a child this age, this is the class I would want to choose.”

    Write one idea per sticky note.

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Sharing rubric expectations with teachers1

    Sharing Rubric Expectations with Teachers

    2. Consider Activity #1b:

    • At your table, brainstorm a list of observable behaviors associated with your assigned indicator. Have a recorder jot down the list on chart paper as you work.

      • Ask yourselves: What are the ongoing observable behaviors of a effective teacher for this indicator? What is the teacher doing?

      • What are the students doing?

    • Be prepared to share your behaviors and rationale with the whole group.

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Sharing rubric expectations with teachers2

    Sharing Rubric Expectations with Teachers

    • Other ideas, from things we have done in these sessions, or activities you have done with your teachers?

    Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


    Debrief and closure

    Debrief and Closure

    • Next steps –

      • Future sessions – Session 4 will include Student Growth Percentile and Value Added

    • Got It/Want It/Questions

    • Please remember to complete the workshop evaluation in MyLearningPlan

    • PowerPoint and Materials will be on NT website

      Thank you for your participation!


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