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Measure ment. Out come. Outcome measurement Positively Impacting Your Bottom Line. Nonprofit Management Center Brown Bag Lunch Series August 8, 2005 Presented by: Alice Freidline Community Investment Director United Way of Midland [email protected] Outcome Measurement.

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Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

Outcome measurement

Positively Impacting Your Bottom Line

Nonprofit Management Center Brown Bag Lunch Series

August 8, 2005

Presented by: Alice Freidline

Community Investment Director

United Way of Midland

[email protected]


Outcome measurement

Outcome Measurement

  • At your tables, record responses to these questions-

  • Why evaluate?

  • What are the challenges of evaluation?


Outcome measurement1

Outcome Measurement

  • Some possible answers to why evaluate-

    • Helps to align expectations

    • Accountability to stakeholders

    • Understand programs better

    • Improve programs

    • Describe services

    • Help to “make the case”

    • Help defend from attack

    • Inform the field, share with colleagues


Outcome measurements

Outcome Measurements

  • Some possible answers to challenges of evaluation

    • Managing expectations about evaluation and types of outcomes programs can deliver

    • Time and resource constraints

    • Fear of failing


Outcome measurement2

Outcome Measurement

  • What do you believe is the most important issue, with regard to organizational effectiveness, in this list?

    • Board development

    • Mission

    • Fundraising

    • Marketing & Finance

    • Evaluation


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

No Matter What You Call It…

  • “Evaluation of project” – Abell Hanger

  • “Expected impact” – Hahl-Proctor

  • “How will you determine that the project is working and that it accomplished its purpose?” – Burlington Resources

  • “Plan to evaluate the Project: Please include measurable, time-specific goals, a description of information to be collected to measure progress and how that information will be collected.” – Meadows Foundation

“Today, no one pays you to ‘do good.’ They pay for effectiveness.”

United Way O.M. Training participant


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

It’s Important Because…

  • It provides clear evidence that the program makes a difference in the lives of people

  • It helps improve services

  • It helps enlist and motivate volunteers

  • It demonstrates the effectiveness of programs to stakeholders (funders, donors, community, BOD, etc.)

“Outcome Measurement creates focus in a way no other management tool can do.” United Way O.M. Training participant


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

What Stakeholders Want Is…

  • To make funding decisions that will make a difference in the lives of people and the community

  • To be convinced that an organization’s programs are wise financial investments

  • To see a direct correlation between program activities and anticipated outcomes

“The funder doesn’t really care about your organization’s needs…they care about what your organization can do!”

Rebecca Vermillion Shawyer, CharityChannel’s Grants & Foundations Review


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

An Effective Way to Demonstrate Such a Correlation Is…

  • To define the program

  • Understand the terminology

    Activities – what the program does to fulfill its mission.

    Outputs – the direct products of program activities. This is stated in real numbers and shows the volume of work accomplished.

    Outcomes – the benefits or changes for participants during or after program activities. Outcomes indicate the impact that your program has on the lives of the participants and is stated from the participants’ viewpoint (i.e. what participants know, think, or can do; or how they behave; or what their condition is, that is different following the program.)

    Outcome Indicators – the specific observable, measurable characteristic or change that will represent achievement of the outcome. Indicators are what measurable data you intend to collect.

    Measured Outcomes – report of data collected; expressed in both a number and a percentage

  • Create a Program Outcome Model


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

Program Outcome Model

Teen Pregnancy Center – Education Program

Total unduplicated number of people served: Last program year 75 Estimated for upcoming program year 90


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

To Define Outcomes, Ask Yourself…

  • Who are the program’s clients/customers/participants/ intended beneficiaries?

  • What do you want to be true of these program recipients during or after your program?

  • What do your participants say about your program – what did they get out of it?

  • When it’s all said and done, “So what?”

“We let customers tell us how their quality of life was enhanced. We asked our clients, ‘What’s important?’”

United Way O.M. Training participant


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

Program Outcome Model

Wake Up and Dream – Peer Group Program

Total unduplicated number of people served: Last program year: N.A. Estimated for upcoming program year 60


Outcome measurement positively impacting your bottom line

Measure ment

Out come

How You Tell Your Story Makes a Difference!

How Our Graduates

Measure Up

Of the 54 Culinary Arts graduates available for employment, 52 (96.3%) were working in a field related to their program of study within six months of graduation and earning an average salary of $28,674.

Successful Graduates

of the Program

Graduates of the Criminal Justice program have gone on to successful careers as lawyers, state troopers, F.B.I. Agents, Deputy U.S. Marshals, prison wardens, police officers, deputy sheriffs, corrections officers, probation officers and private security agents.


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