APSCN  English Language  Learner ELL Data

APSCN English Language Learner ELL Data PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Who is an ELL?. English Language LearnerDefinition: Student whose home language is other than EnglishAn ELL must meet these two criteria:1) Student is identified as an ELL at the time of enrollment by a Home Language Survey, which is filled out by parents or guardians; 2) Student is

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APSCN English Language Learner ELL Data

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1. APSCN English Language Learner (ELL) Data Statewide Information System (SIS) 2011-2012 Good afternoon. This next set of slides will give you an overview of data fields related to English language learners or students for whom English is a second language. These students are also referred to as limited English proficient or LEP. Data are being collected in 2011-2012 as a result of reports for state and federal reporting and funding of such information as attendance, as well as student assessment on the Augmented Benchmark examination and other tests that English language learners take during the school year. Now, let’s go through each data field individually. Note that you need to know what these terms mean so that you can work with people in your school district to make sure that your ELL student roster and all student data related to ELLs are correct. Understanding the terminology will make it much easier for you to work with others in your district to verify that your APSCN data are correct. These people may include the English as a second language coordinator, counselors, principals, or anyone who keeps track of the number of ELLs in your district, who they are, and how they are progressing in their educational program. NEXT SLIDEGood afternoon. This next set of slides will give you an overview of data fields related to English language learners or students for whom English is a second language. These students are also referred to as limited English proficient or LEP. Data are being collected in 2011-2012 as a result of reports for state and federal reporting and funding of such information as attendance, as well as student assessment on the Augmented Benchmark examination and other tests that English language learners take during the school year. Now, let’s go through each data field individually. Note that you need to know what these terms mean so that you can work with people in your school district to make sure that your ELL student roster and all student data related to ELLs are correct. Understanding the terminology will make it much easier for you to work with others in your district to verify that your APSCN data are correct. These people may include the English as a second language coordinator, counselors, principals, or anyone who keeps track of the number of ELLs in your district, who they are, and how they are progressing in their educational program. NEXT SLIDE

2. Who is an ELL? English Language Learner Definition: Student whose home language is other than English An ELL must meet these two criteria: 1) Student is identified as an ELL at the time of enrollment by a Home Language Survey, which is filled out by parents or guardians; 2) Student is placed in an English as a second language or ESL program using a screener or placement test that has indicated that the student is not fully fluent in English. So, who is an ELL or English Language Learner? The definition of an ELL or English language learner is a student whose home language is other than English. To be an ELL in APSCN, a student must meet 2 criteria: First, a student is identified at the time of enrollment as a PHLOTE student or a pupil whose home language is other than English, through the Home Language Survey, which is filled out by parents or guardians, again at the time of enrollment. And second, a student is classified as an English language learner or ELL after taking a screener or placement test that assesses his or her level of English understanding. This placement test will indicate if the student is not fully fluent in English and needs instruction in English by teacher certified in English as a second language. These ELL criteria for apply to ALL students whose home language is other than English. This means that an ELL or English language learner may also be a migrant student, so be careful to note this at the time of enrollment and work with others in your districts to make sure that the data you enter into APSCN is correct. Again, I cannot stress enough the importance of working with your colleagues, especially those who deal directly with ELLs, such as your district’s ESL coordinator, counselors, principals, and ESL teachers. NEXT SLIDESo, who is an ELL or English Language Learner? The definition of an ELL or English language learner is a student whose home language is other than English. To be an ELL in APSCN, a student must meet 2 criteria: First, a student is identified at the time of enrollment as a PHLOTE student or a pupil whose home language is other than English, through the Home Language Survey, which is filled out by parents or guardians, again at the time of enrollment. And second, a student is classified as an English language learner or ELL after taking a screener or placement test that assesses his or her level of English understanding. This placement test will indicate if the student is not fully fluent in English and needs instruction in English by teacher certified in English as a second language. These ELL criteria for apply to ALL students whose home language is other than English. This means that an ELL or English language learner may also be a migrant student, so be careful to note this at the time of enrollment and work with others in your districts to make sure that the data you enter into APSCN is correct. Again, I cannot stress enough the importance of working with your colleagues, especially those who deal directly with ELLs, such as your district’s ESL coordinator, counselors, principals, and ESL teachers. NEXT SLIDE

3. Status, ELL You will see this throughout the SIS Manual, 2010-2011. First, let’s revisit the definition of ELL. Status, ELL is a term found throughout the SIS Manual. NEXT SLIDEFirst, let’s revisit the definition of ELL. Status, ELL is a term found throughout the SIS Manual. NEXT SLIDE

4. Status, ELL Status, English Language Learner (ELL) – Does the student have a language background other than English, and his or her proficiency in English is such that the probability of the student’s academic success in an English-only classroom is below that of native English language students? Status, ELL is defined in the SIS Manual in the following way: READ SLIDE NEXT SLIDEStatus, ELL is defined in the SIS Manual in the following way: READ SLIDE NEXT SLIDE

5. Go to your SIS Manual 2011-2012, page 133. Now let’s look at page 129 in your 2010-2011 SIS. If you have your manual, please turn to this page. You will remember that some of these data fields were new to you last year. After I have reviewed the terminology and the reasons for collecting these data, please let us know how we can assist you, if you have any questions after this presentation. Again, you need to know what these data mean so that you can ensure that the data you are entering in the system are correct. Working with your colleagues to make sure that you have correct data is critical to the success of the APSCN SIS system. NEXT SLIDENow let’s look at page 129 in your 2010-2011 SIS. If you have your manual, please turn to this page. You will remember that some of these data fields were new to you last year. After I have reviewed the terminology and the reasons for collecting these data, please let us know how we can assist you, if you have any questions after this presentation. Again, you need to know what these data mean so that you can ensure that the data you are entering in the system are correct. Working with your colleagues to make sure that you have correct data is critical to the success of the APSCN SIS system. NEXT SLIDE

6. DATA FIELDS 1) Former ELL/LEP Monitored M1-Monitored Year 1 M2-Monitored Year 2 2) ELL/LEP Entry Date 3) ELL/LEP Exit Date 4) ESL Waived Services Date 5) Immigrant There were four new data fields added in 2009 related to English language learners or ELLs, which we also call limited English proficient students or LEP students. These are the same names for students who are not fully fluent in English and are often new to schools in the U.S. and Arkansas. This year a new data field has been added, that of “Immigrant,” found on demographic screen #102, Field 23. READ SLIDE NEXT SLIDEThere were four new data fields added in 2009 related to English language learners or ELLs, which we also call limited English proficient students or LEP students. These are the same names for students who are not fully fluent in English and are often new to schools in the U.S. and Arkansas. This year a new data field has been added, that of “Immigrant,” found on demographic screen #102, Field 23. READ SLIDE NEXT SLIDE

7. Who is Former ELL/LEP Monitored? ST0230 Monitored Former Limited English Proficient Student or MFLEP as defined by the USDOE An ELL who has met all criteria to eligible for exit from ESL services A former LEP student who is fluent in English and can succeed in the regular education classroom. Again, a former ELL/LEP monitored student has to meet all criteria to be eligible for exiting from English as a second language or ESL services. A former LEP student is one who is fluent in English and can succeed in the regular education classroom. Please share this information in the district to make sure that everyone has the definitions to these new data fields in APSCN. Again, a former ELL/LEP monitored students is: READ BULLETS IN SLIDE NEXT SLIDEAgain, a former ELL/LEP monitored student has to meet all criteria to be eligible for exiting from English as a second language or ESL services. A former LEP student is one who is fluent in English and can succeed in the regular education classroom. Please share this information in the district to make sure that everyone has the definitions to these new data fields in APSCN. Again, a former ELL/LEP monitored students is: READ BULLETS IN SLIDE NEXT SLIDE

8. Former ELL/LEP Monitored ST0230 Former ELL/LEP Monitored— A student who was exited from ESL services and whose academic progress is being monitored for two years in the regular education classroom as required by Federal law. M1 – Monitored Year 1 M2 – Monitored Year 2 The first data field that was new last year is Former ELL/LEP Monitored. This student is defined as READ SLIDE. Under Title III of No Child Left Behind, all English language learners or ELLs who have reached fluent English proficiency and have been exited from an English as a second language program shall be monitored for two years to make sure that they are succeeding in the regular English-language classroom and to provide assistance when necessary. Monitoring begins immediately on exiting ESL services, so the exit date that you enter in APSCN will be the start date for monitoring. One year is defined as 12 months, so if a student is exited in September 2009, the student will be in year 1 of monitoring and classified as M1-Monitored Year 1 in APSCN. In September 2010, on the anniversary date of being exited from an ESL program. the student will then be classified as M2-Monitored Year 2. NEXT SLIDEThe first data field that was new last year is Former ELL/LEP Monitored. This student is defined as READ SLIDE. Under Title III of No Child Left Behind, all English language learners or ELLs who have reached fluent English proficiency and have been exited from an English as a second language program shall be monitored for two years to make sure that they are succeeding in the regular English-language classroom and to provide assistance when necessary. Monitoring begins immediately on exiting ESL services, so the exit date that you enter in APSCN will be the start date for monitoring. One year is defined as 12 months, so if a student is exited in September 2009, the student will be in year 1 of monitoring and classified as M1-Monitored Year 1 in APSCN. In September 2010, on the anniversary date of being exited from an ESL program. the student will then be classified as M2-Monitored Year 2. NEXT SLIDE

9. ELL/LEP Entry Date ST0231 ELL/LEP Entry Date – The date the student entered a U.S. school for the first time, regardless if the entry was in Arkansas or another state. The second new data field is the ELL/LEP Entry Date. The ELL/LEP Entry Date is defined in SIS as: READ SLIDE. Note that this is an exact date that the student was placed in an ESL or English as a second language program and started receiving ESL services in a school in the US. If a student is a new immigrant, this date will be around the same time as the student’s enrollment date. Note that your district’s ESL coordinator will gather this information for you through the Home Language Survey or interview with parents or guardians. The ESL coordinator should work hard to ensure that this date is as accurate as possible by speaking with parents or guardians about the educational background of new students. NEXT SLIDEThe second new data field is the ELL/LEP Entry Date. The ELL/LEP Entry Date is defined in SIS as: READ SLIDE. Note that this is an exact date that the student was placed in an ESL or English as a second language program and started receiving ESL services in a school in the US. If a student is a new immigrant, this date will be around the same time as the student’s enrollment date. Note that your district’s ESL coordinator will gather this information for you through the Home Language Survey or interview with parents or guardians. The ESL coordinator should work hard to ensure that this date is as accurate as possible by speaking with parents or guardians about the educational background of new students. NEXT SLIDE

10. Why do we need an entry date? To determine how long a student has received ELL services To report accurate student data to State and Federal governmental agencies To know how many students will take state assessments at each grade level So, why do we need an entry date? The ADE is required to complete a number of reports and respond to information in which we need accurate enrollment data. We need to know how long a student has received services for English language learners, such as English as a second language instruction. Also, we pull these data for testing purposes. We need to know how many ELLs there are at each grade level for student assessment purposes. Including the entry date, as well as the exit date that we just discussed, will help ensure that data are pulled accurately from SIS. Remember that the accuracy of these data depend on your work with the ESL coordinator in your district and others who can give you the correct information. NEXT SLIDESo, why do we need an entry date? The ADE is required to complete a number of reports and respond to information in which we need accurate enrollment data. We need to know how long a student has received services for English language learners, such as English as a second language instruction. Also, we pull these data for testing purposes. We need to know how many ELLs there are at each grade level for student assessment purposes. Including the entry date, as well as the exit date that we just discussed, will help ensure that data are pulled accurately from SIS. Remember that the accuracy of these data depend on your work with the ESL coordinator in your district and others who can give you the correct information. NEXT SLIDE

11. ELL/LEP Exit Date ST0232 ELL/LEP Exit Date – The date the student met criteria for Fluent English Proficient status and was exited from the LEP program; no longer receives services; is a regular education student. The next new data field is the exact date that an English language learner or limited English proficient student exited from English as a second language or ESL services. The ELL/LEP Exit Date is defined in SIS in the following way: READ SLIDE NEXT SLIDEThe next new data field is the exact date that an English language learner or limited English proficient student exited from English as a second language or ESL services. The ELL/LEP Exit Date is defined in SIS in the following way: READ SLIDE NEXT SLIDE

12. Why do we need an exit date? To determine how long a student has received ELL services To report accurate enrollment data to State and Federal governmental agencies To know when monitoring of a former ELL began in your district So, why do we need an exit date? We need an exit date for the following reasons. First, we need to know how long a student has received ESL services. Having an entry and exit date gives us this information. Second, the ADE is required to complete a number of reports and respond to information in which we need accurate enrollment data. We need to know how long a student has received services for English language learners, such as English as a second language instruction. And third, we need to know when monitoring of a former ELL or English language learner began in your district. Again, the accuracy of these data depend on your work with the ESL coordinator in your district and others who can give you the correct information. NEXT SLIDESo, why do we need an exit date? We need an exit date for the following reasons. First, we need to know how long a student has received ESL services. Having an entry and exit date gives us this information. Second, the ADE is required to complete a number of reports and respond to information in which we need accurate enrollment data. We need to know how long a student has received services for English language learners, such as English as a second language instruction. And third, we need to know when monitoring of a former ELL or English language learner began in your district. Again, the accuracy of these data depend on your work with the ESL coordinator in your district and others who can give you the correct information. NEXT SLIDE

13. ESL Waived Services Date ST0233 ESL Waived Services Date – The date a LEP/ELL student’s parent signed a form waiving ESL services for the student. The next data field is ESL Waived Services date. This information is also located on page 129 of the 2010-2011 SIS Manual. The ESL Waived Service Date is defined in the following way: READ SLIDE. Note that the slide reads “parent signed,” but note that this can also be a guardian of the English language learner who is waiving the student’s rights to ESL services. NEXT SLIDE The next data field is ESL Waived Services date. This information is also located on page 129 of the 2010-2011 SIS Manual. The ESL Waived Service Date is defined in the following way: READ SLIDE. Note that the slide reads “parent signed,” but note that this can also be a guardian of the English language learner who is waiving the student’s rights to ESL services. NEXT SLIDE

14. Why do we need a date for waived ESL services? Student identification purposes: ALL ELLs or English language learners are required to take the English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) each spring. This includes ELLs whose parents choose not to enroll their students in an ESL program. So, why do we need the date that parents or guardians waived ESL services for an English language learner? First, we need to be able to identify these students in the system so that they can be included in the an ELDA test or English Language Development Assessment, which is required to be given to all ELLs each spring to measure how they are progressing in English. Again, all ELLs must take the ELDA each spring, including ELLs who parents or guardians have waived their right to ESL services and are not enrolled in an ESL program. NEXT SLIDESo, why do we need the date that parents or guardians waived ESL services for an English language learner? First, we need to be able to identify these students in the system so that they can be included in the an ELDA test or English Language Development Assessment, which is required to be given to all ELLs each spring to measure how they are progressing in English. Again, all ELLs must take the ELDA each spring, including ELLs who parents or guardians have waived their right to ESL services and are not enrolled in an ESL program. NEXT SLIDE

15. Definition of Recent Immigrant ST0225 Immigrant Status 1. Is between the ages of 3 and 21. 2. Was not born in any state. 3. Has not attended one or more schools in one or more states for more than three full academic years. Definition provided by U.S. Dept. of Ed/OELA

16. Immigrant Status is not ELL Status Immigrant Status is not dependent on ELL status; a recent immigrant may be an ELL student, but could also be FEP (fully English proficient) and not qualify for ESL (English as a Second Language) services. ESL program staff will not be maintaining this data entry. APSCN data entry personnel will have to track and maintain

17. For more information, contact: Dr. Andre Guerrero Director, ELL Program, ADE [email protected] (501) 682-5014

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