Ipv6 at cern c5 presentation 7 november 2003
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 30

IPv6 at CERN C5 Presentation 7 November 2003 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 65 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

IPv6 at CERN C5 Presentation 7 November 2003. Daniel Davids CERN / IT. Summary. Why IPv6 ? Migration ? Internet2 LSR. Why IPv6 ?. Shortcomings of IPv4 Advantages of IPv6 IPv4 Address Space Expansion Header Format Simplification and Support for Extensions & Options

Download Presentation

IPv6 at CERN C5 Presentation 7 November 2003

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Ipv6 at cern c5 presentation 7 november 2003

IPv6 at CERNC5 Presentation7 November 2003

Daniel Davids

CERN / IT


Summary

Summary

  • Why IPv6 ?

  • Migration ?

  • Internet2 LSR

C5 Presentation


Why ipv6

Why IPv6 ?

Shortcomings of IPv4

Advantages of IPv6

  • IPv4 Address Space Expansion

  • Header Format Simplification and

  • Support for Extensions & Options

  • Address Auto-Configuration

  • Designed for P2P Mobility

C5 Presentation


Ipv4 address space allocation

IPv4 Address Space Allocation

1981 – IPv4 Published

1985 ~ 10% Allocated

1990 ~ 12% Allocated

1995 ~ 39% Allocated

2000 ~ 48% Allocated

2003 ~ 65% Allocated

2005 ~ ?

? ~ 100% Allocated

?

C5 Presentation


Ripe ncc statement

RIPE NCC Statement

IPv4 Address Space: 30 October 2003

http://www.ripe.net/

There have been press articles posted over the past year that make statements about the remaining pool of IPv4 address space.

A recent article states there is a shortage and that Internet Protocol Numbers will run out some time in the year 2005.

C5 Presentation


Address space expansion

Address Space Expansion

8

8

8

8

128 Class-As of 16,777,216

16,384 Class-Bs of 65,536

2,097,152 Class-Cs of 254

IPv4

A

B

C

D

IPv6

3

20

9

16

16

64

0

0

1

Sub-

Nets

RIR

LIR

EU

Interface

/23

/32

/48

/64

/128

Total of 18.4 Exa-Subnets of each 18.4 Exa-Addresses

36,050 Subnets per Square-Meter of Earth’s Surface

http://www.ripe.net/ripe/docs/ipv6policy.html

C5 Presentation


Cern s allocations

CERN’s Allocations

  • CERN’s IPv4 Address Ranges

    • 128.141.0.0/16 & 137.138.0.0/16

    • This makes roughly 130,000 Addresses

  • CERN’s IPv6 Address Range

    • 2001:1458::/32 - LIR Since June 2003

    • This makes roughly 4 Billion Sub-Nets

Item for Discussion

When does CERN intend to migrate to IPv6? Knowing that their current IPv4 address range is currently sufficient and that the current router infrastructure can NOT be upgraded to IPv6!

C5 Presentation


Why ipv61

Why IPv6 ?

Shortcomings of IPv4

Advantages of IPv6

  • IPv4 Address Space Expansion

  • Header Format Simplification and

  • Support for Extensions & Options

  • Address Auto-Configuration

  • Designed for P2P Mobility

C5 Presentation


Ipv6 header options

IPv6 Header & Options

  • The IPv6 Header Contains the Mandatory Information Fields

    Version | DiffServ | Flow Label | Payload Length

    Next Header | Hop Limit | Source | Destination

  • Optional Information goes into Linked Extension Headers

    Hop-by-Hop | Destination | Routing | Fragment

    Authentication | Encapsulating Security Payload

C5 Presentation


Why ipv62

Why IPv6 ?

Shortcomings of IPv4

Advantages of IPv6

  • IPv4 Address Space Expansion

  • Header Format Simplification and

  • Support for Extensions & Options

  • Address Auto-Configuration

  • Designed for P2P Mobility

C5 Presentation


Address auto configuration

Address Auto-Configuration

  • An Interface can receive an IPv6 address from each network it sees

    • Multiple IPv6 Addresses per Interface

    • Uniqueness: Use of Pseudo-MAC Address

Mobility

  • Always use the same IPv6 address regardless of the network it sees

    • It Acquires a Dedicated “Home Address”

    • Use of Source Routing – Efficient in IPv6

C5 Presentation


Summary1

Summary

  • Why IPv6 ?

  • Migration ?

  • Internet2 LSR

C5 Presentation


Migration

Migration ?

  • Co-Existance 4 & 6

  • IPv6 in IPv4 Tunnels

  • NAT-PT for IPv6

  • IPv6 Test-Bed

C5 Presentation


Co existance 4 6

Co-Existance 4/6

  • Co-Existance is no Problem

  • As Long as you Don’t want to

    Interact between IPv4 & IPv6

  • Your Work-Station can run Both

    IPv4/6 Stacks Simultaneously

  • IPv4/6 has No Impact on Bridging

  • Most Recent Backbone Routers

    can Route IPv6 at Wire-Speed

  • The Application Needs to Decide

    if it Wants to Use IPv4 or IPv6

C5 Presentation


Ipv6 in ipv4 tunnels

IPv6 in IPv4 Tunnels

Border Routers Encapsulate IPv6 Packets in IPv4 Packets and Send them over the IPv4 Network towards the Peer end of the Tunnel

Both Ends of the Tunnel must have an IPv4 and an IPv6 Address!

IPv6

6in4

IPv4

6in4

IPv6

IPv4

6in4

IPv6

IPv4

6in4

IPv6

C5 Presentation


Nat pt for ipv6

IPv4

IPv6

Native

IPv4

Native

IPv6

NAT-PT for IPv6

Network Address TranslationProtocol Translation for IPv6

NAT-PT Allows Native IPv6 Hosts to Communicate with Native IPv4 Hosts, AND VICE VERSA!

Constraints: No Security – Not All Applications Work!

C5 Presentation


Ipv6 test bed

IPv6 Test-Bed

C5 Presentation


Summary2

Summary

  • Why IPv6 ?

  • Migration ?

  • Internet2 LSR

C5 Presentation


Internet2 lsr

Internet2 LSR

  • People Involved

  • LSR Contest Info

  • LSR of May 2003

  • LSR of October 2003

  • The DataTAG Project

C5 Presentation


People involved

People Involved

  • CERN, Geneva:

    • Olivier Herve Martin

    • Daniel Davids

    • Paolo Moroni

  • DataTAG/CERN:

    • Edoardo Martelli

  • CALTECH - US:

    • Harvey Newman

    • Sylvain Ravot

    • Dan Nae

C5 Presentation


Internet2 lsr contest

Internet2 LSR Contest

http://lsr.internet2.edu/

“A minimum of 100 megabytes must be transferred a minimum terrestrial distance of 100 kilometers with a minimum of two router hops in each direction between the source node and the destination node across one or more operational and production-oriented high-performance research and education networks”

“Unit of measurement is bit-meters/second”

C5 Presentation


Lsr ipv6 of may 2003

LSR IPv6 of May 2003

  • TCP/IPv6 Single Stream

  • By CALTECH & CERN

  • Established on 3 May 2003

  • 7,067 Kilometers of Network

  • 983 Mbits/second - 3600 seconds

  • Data transferred: 412 Gigabytes

  • 6,947 Terabit-meters/second

  • See “http://cern.ch/ipv6-lsr/”

C5 Presentation


Ipv6 at cern c5 presentation 7 november 2003

Chicago - USA

Geneva - CH

W02CHI

Dual Xeon2.2GHz

SysKonnect GbE

W02GVA

Dual Xeon 2.2GHz

SysKonnect GbE

1 GE

1 GE

R05CHI

Juniper M10

R05GVA

Juniper M10

1 GE

1 GE

DataTAG

1 GE

STM-16

1 GE

R04CHI

Cisco 7609

Alcatel

1670

Alcatel

1670

R04GVA

Cisco 7606

C5 Presentation


Lsr ipv6 of october 2003

LSR IPv6 of October 2003

  • TCP/IPv6 Single Stream

  • By CERN & CALTECH

  • Established on 3 November 2003

  • 7,067 Kilometers of Network

  • 3,867 Mbits/second – Three Hours

  • Data transferred: 5,264 Gigabytes

  • 27,329 Terabit-meters/second

  • See “http://cern.ch/emartell/done/datatag/

    ipv6_land_speed_record_oct_2003/

    ipv6-lsr-20031031.html”

C5 Presentation


Ipv6 at cern c5 presentation 7 november 2003

Chicago - USA

Geneva - CH

V13CHI

Dual Xeon 3GHz

Intel PRO/10GbE LR

OPLAPRO27

Dual Itanium2 1.5GHz

Intel PRO/10GbE LR

10 GE

10 GE

DataTAG

STM-64

R07CHI

Procket 8801

R07GVA

Procket 8801

C5 Presentation


Internet2 lsr history tera bit meter per second

Internet2 LSR HistoryTera-bit-meter-per-second

IPv4 61.7Peta-bmps

IPv6 27.3Peta-bmps

C5 Presentation


Internet2 lsr history giga bit per second

Internet2 LSR HistoryGiga-bit-per-second

For the First Time in theWide Area Networking History,Throughput Performance was onlyLimited by the End-Systemsand NOT by the Network!

C5 Presentation


The datatag project

The DataTAG Project

Research and Technological Development for a TransAtlantic GRID

The goal is to create a large-scale intercontinental testbed for data-intensive Grids with a focus on “Network Research” and “Grid Interoperability”

DataTAG-Funded Partners

PPARC (UK), INRIA (FR), UoA (NL), INFN (IT) & CERN (CH)

Test-bed

Transatlantic STM-16 & STM-64

between Geneva (CERN) and Chicago (StarLight)

See “http://www.datatag.org/”

C5 Presentation


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • IPv6 Works – but the World is NOT Ready Yet

  • Migration to a IPv6-Only World will Take Long

  • The Advantages of IPv6 are Considerable!

C5 Presentation


Thank you for your attention questions discussion

Thank You For your Attention

Questions / Discussion


  • Login