Designing better prescription charts: Why we can’t just ask the nurses
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 1

D R I V E PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 72 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Designing better prescription charts: Why we can’t just ask the nurses. Jonathan Back, Ioanna Iacovides, Dominic Furniss, Chris Vincent, Anna Cox & Ann Blandford. UCL Interaction Centre, University College London, UK. Prescription charts. Understanding context. Previous studies.

Download Presentation

D R I V E

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


D r i v e

Designing better prescription charts: Why we can’t just ask the nurses

Jonathan Back, Ioanna Iacovides, Dominic Furniss, Chris Vincent, Anna Cox & Ann Blandford

UCL Interaction Centre, University College London, UK.

Prescription charts

Understanding context

Previous studies

consider how practices relate to the interaction between user, device and supporting artifacts.

Fit for purpose?

Future work

We cannot just ask nurses what they do since individuals are poor at reflecting on and articulating low-level, often automated, processes. We need a combination of approaches:

In the UK there are over 50 variations of prescription chart. Many of these do not seem to have been designed with programming tasks in mind.

Safer programming

Previous experimental work has demonstrated that chart design impacts on the likelihood of programming errors.

In our experiments, people were not familiar with values they entered and had little expertise in this area. In practice these assumptions are likely to vary depending on the context.

1. Observational studies

2. Eliciting conceptual models

3. Investigating ad-hoc artifacts.

This enable a consideration of how practices relate to the interaction between user, device and supporting artifacts.

What evidence do we need to design a more appropriate chart that supports the safe programming of infusion devices?

DRIVE


  • Login