Gender electoral turnout and abstention in europe
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 14

Gender, Electoral Turnout and Abstention in Europe PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 51 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Gender, Electoral Turnout and Abstention in Europe. Susan Banducci, University of Exeter Yvonne Galligan, Queen’s University Belfast Bernadette C. Hayes, University of Aberdeen. Focus. European Parliament post-election survey, 2004 Gender differences in electoral turnout

Download Presentation

Gender, Electoral Turnout and Abstention in Europe

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Gender, Electoral Turnout and Abstention in Europe

Susan Banducci, University of Exeter

Yvonne Galligan, Queen’s University Belfast

Bernadette C. Hayes, University of Aberdeen


Focus

  • European Parliament post-election survey, 2004

  • Gender differences in electoral turnout

  • Gender differences in timing of decision to vote

  • Do men and women differ in terms of their electoral turnout?

  • Are women more likely than men to delay their electoral decision-making?


Main Findings: Electoral Turnout

  • Men and women do not significantly differ in terms of their voting behaviour

  • Around equal numbers of men and women turned out to vote across the various nations

  • Key finding is the increasing rates of abstention by both men and women both within and across the various nations


European Election Turnout – Gender differences have disappeared

Source: Eurobarometer, European Election Study 1999 & EP Post Election Survey 2004


ELECTORAL ABSTENTION

  • The decision to vote or not to vote came later for women than for men

  • Reasons for electoral abstention – circumstantial (absence from home, illness or disability, pressure of work, registration problems) versus voluntary (uninterested, distrustful of politics, critical of the European Union)


Voluntary or Circumstantial Abstention: Gender differences

  • Among men who did not vote, 33% give circumstantial reasons (50% voluntary)

  • Among women who did not vote, 38% give circumstantial reasons (45% voluntary)


Main Findings: Reasons for Electoral Abstention

  • Voluntary reasons are primary factor in accounting for European abstention although women were somewhat less likely to offer this explanation than men

  • Women somewhat more likely to cite circumstantial reasons which they were more likely to attribute to personal and family-related matters than were men


Main Findings: Gender Differences in the Impact of Political Orientations on Electoral Abstention

  • Main orientations of electoral abstainers indicated a distrust of politicians and a lack of interest in politics

  • Women abstainers were notably more likely to be uninterested in politics than male abstainers


Women Candidates and Political Engagement

  • More women candidates, higher levels of interest among women

  • More women candidates, women more likely to vote

  • Countries with quotas (party, nat’l) had 8% more women candidates (36% compared to 28%)

  • On average, women had an 8% increase in the probability of voting in countries with quotas


Quotas: MEP Survey

  • 45% of women MEPs (compared to 25% male MEPs) feel that European-wide quotas for women should be adopted

  • Source: David Farrell, Simon Hix, Mark Johnson and Roger Scully (2006) 'EPRG 2000 and 2006 MEP Surveys Dataset', http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/EPRG/


Should there be candidate gender quotas for EP elections?

Source: Farrell et al (2006)


European Wide Lists: MEP Survey

  • Most MEPs disagree with European-wide lists (58%)

  • However, 40%+ of women MEPs feel that 10% or more MEPs should be elected from European-wide lists


Should MEPs be elected from Europe-wide lists?


Policy Implications

  • Efficient voting registration practices

  • Alternative ways of accessing the ballot

  • Address information deficit, particularly evident among women non-voters

  • 50:50 gender balanced party lists

  • European lists for proportion of EP seats, with mandatory 50:50 gender balance


  • Login