Parent media campaigns
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 38

Parent Media Campaigns PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 76 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Parent Media Campaigns. 2005-2010: Successes, Outcomes and Lessons Learned from 21 Reasons in Portland, Maine. Overview. Strategic Prevention Framework. A tool for campaign planning. Goals:. Strengthen collaboration in the community to prevent substance abuse Reduce substance abuse.

Download Presentation

Parent Media Campaigns

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Parent Media Campaigns

2005-2010: Successes, Outcomes and Lessons Learned from 21 Reasons in Portland, Maine.


Overview


Strategic Prevention Framework

A tool for campaign planning


Goals:

  • Strengthen collaboration in the community to prevent substance abuse

  • Reduce substance abuse


Parents’ role in prevention

Parents have more influence over their child than:

Friends •Music • TV

Internet • Celebrities

Sources: Califano, J (2009); IOM (2004); Moore, G, H Rothwell and J Segrott (2010).


Parents’ role in prevention

  • Don’t believe their parents think it’s wrong are 2.4 X’s as likely to drink.

  • Don’t think they will be caught are 3.3 X’s as likely to drink.

Source: Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (2009).


Local data: Marijuana

  • Don’t believe their parents think it’s wrong are 4 X’s as likely to use.

Source: MIYHS (2009).


We know we need to bring parents on board…

  • What do you want them to do?

  • How do you get them to do it?

  • Which communication method?


BEHAVIOR CHANGE

So many theories. . .

. . . so little time

Source on Transtheoretical/Stages of Change Model: Pochaska, J and C DiClemente (1983).


Moving Along the Continuum

  • Effects of alcohol on developing brains

  • Link between UD and negative health outcomes, including addiction and dependence

  • European youth drinking rates


What do we want them to do?


Which Communication Method?

Can community-level media campaigns change attitudes and behaviors?

Literature suggests YES, modest effects.

Sources: Derzon, J, and Lipsey, M (2002); Noar, S (2006).


Communication Basics

1.) Medium is the message

2.) Meet your audience

3.) Be culturally competent

4.) Pay attention to your tone


What does this look like?


21 Reasons’ Parent Media Campaigns

What is the extent of the problem in your community?


21 Reasons’ Parent Media Campaigns

But Why? Why Here?


21 Reasons’ Parent Media Campaigns

  • 2005: “Parents, do you know?”

  • 2006 & 2007: 5 Tips from Youth

  • 2007 & 2008: What’s Your Reason?

  • 2009 & 2010: “Wow, times have changed!”

  • 2011: “PortlandPreventionTips.org”


2005: “Parents, do you know?”

GOAL: To inform parents of the legal penalties for furnishing to minors.


2005: “Parents, do you know?”


2005: “Parents, do you know?”

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Earned media is a powerful force – for better or for worse.

  • Cultural competency and tone matter.

  • Formative research with the target audience is key to success.


21 Reasons Parent Phone Survey


2006 & 2007: 5 Tips from Youth

GOAL: To provide parents with positive advice using youth voices.


2006 & 2007: 5 Tips from Youth

  • New message based on new research: 21 Reasons’ Parent Phone Survey


2006 & 2007: 5 Tips from Youth

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Different media will provide different return on investment.

  • Choice of media should be informed by target audience.

  • Identify evaluation metrics early and track throughout.


2007 & 2008: What’s Your Reason?

GOAL: To reach parents with parental monitoring tips using youth voices in an innovative format.


2007 & 2008: What’s Your Reason?


2007 & 2008: What’s Your Reason?

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Successful partnerships with youth depend on early buy-in of key faculty and student groups, as well as a project which appeals to youth or meets their needs.

  • ROI can be very high, including earned media and attention from stakeholders.


2009 & 2010: Wow, Times Have Changed!

GOAL: To change perceived social norms around youth alcohol use.


Past 30-Day Alcohol Use, 1995-2008Data from Maine Youth Drug and Alcohol Use Survey (MYDAUS)


2009 & 2010: Wow, Times Have Changed!


2009 & 2010: Wow, Times Have Changed!


2009 & 2010: Wow, Times Have Changed!

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Though contest had mixed success, campaign media coverage led to strong results.


2011: Portland Prevention Tips

GOAL: To increase the percentage of Portland parents counting and locking up their alcohol.


2011: Portland Prevention Tips


2011: Portland Prevention Tips


2011: Portland Prevention Tips

LESSONS LEARNED:

  • Pre-campaign assessment of target audience needs and culture pays off.

  • Focus on specific behavior and needs of our audience.

  • Evaluation tools allow us to measure outputs as well as outcomes.


Contact Information

Jo Morrissey

Project Manager

21 Reasons DFC Program

48 Free Street, Suite 208

Portland, ME 04101

207.773.7737 • [email protected]

www.21Reasons.org


Sources Cited

Califano, J. (2009). How to Raise a Drug-Free Kid. Simon & Schuster: New York.

Derzon, J. and Lipsey, M. (2002). “A Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Mass-Communication for Changing Substance-Use Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior.” In W Crano and D Burgoon (Eds.), Mass Media and Drug Prevention: Classic and Contemporary Theories and Research (231-258). London and New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (MIYHS) (2009).

Moore, G., Rothwell, H., and Segrott, J. (2010). “An exploratory study of the relationship between parental attitudes and behaviour and young people's consumption of alcohol.” Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy 5: 6.

Noar, S. (2006). “ A 10-Year Retrospective of Research in Health Mass Media Campaigns: Where Do We Go From Here?” Journal of Health Communication 11: 21-42.

National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (2004). Reducing Underage Drinking: A Collective Responsibility. Committee on Developing a Strategy to Reduce and Prevent Underage Drinking. Bonnie, R. and O’Connell, M.E., Eds. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Prochaska and DiClemente (1983). “Stages and Processes of Self-Change of Smoking: Torward An Integrative Model of Change.” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 51 (3): 390-395.


  • Login