Creating a nj high school diploma that counts
Download
1 / 24

Creating a NJ High School Diploma That Counts - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Updated On :

Creating a NJ High School Diploma That Counts. New Jersey and the American Diploma Project State Board of Education August 16, 2006. What does it take to be prepared for postsecondary education and work?. Closing the Expectations Gap.

Related searches for Creating a NJ High School Diploma That Counts

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Creating a NJ High School Diploma That Counts' - stacy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Creating a nj high school diploma that counts l.jpg

Creating a NJ High School Diploma That Counts

New Jersey and the American Diploma Project

State Board of Education

August 16, 2006



Closing the expectations gap l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

Align NJ’s high school standards in language arts literacy and math to the knowledge and skills required for success in postsecondary education and work.


Closing the expectations gap4 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

  • Governor Corzine will announce progress on this alignment process on August 17, 2006.

  • NJ’s standards in math and LAL are being aligned.


Closing the expectations gap5 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

Require all students to take a college- and work-ready curriculum to earn a high school diploma.

  • Specific HS course requirements will be discussed with all districts this Fall.

  • New HS graduation requirements will be presented to the State Board as part of ADP.


Closing the expectations gap6 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

To be college- and work-ready, students need to complete a rigorous sequence of courses in math and English.


Closing the expectations gap7 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

In Math:

  • Four years of math

  • Content equivalent to Algebra I and II, Geometry, and a fourth course such as statistics, pre-calculus, and data analysis


Closing the expectations gap8 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

In English/Language Arts Literacy:

  • Four years

  • Content equivalent to four years of grade-level English or higher (e.g., AP English Language and Composition)


Closing the expectations gap9 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

  • Administer to high school students a college- and work-ready assessment, aligned to state standards, that provides clear and timely information to address critical skill deficiencies while still in high school.

  • ADP recommends a more rigorous HSPA and end of course exams in Algebra II and English III.


Closing the expectations gap10 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

  • Assist middle and high schools to restructure programs and schools to deliver a rigorous, standards-based curriculum to ALL students.

  • Design and offer professional development to enable educators to meet these goals.


Closing the expectations gap11 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

  • Eliminate the Special Review Assessment (SRA) and establish an appeal process for students who don’t pass the HSPA.


Closing the expectations gap12 l.jpg
Closing the Expectations Gap and work?

Preparing Students for Graduation

Alternatives for

Students

Support for

Students

Identification of

Students


Identification of students l.jpg
Identification of Students and work?

GEPA Results

Predictive Tables

based on

GEPA-HSPA

correlations

  • Students who score below proficiency levels on GEPA are required to have intervention programs in high school.

  • Based on a student’s GEPA score, predictions can be made about likely performance on the HSPA and intervention programs developed as appropriate.


Support for students l.jpg
Support for Students and work?

Menu of

options available

to

schools

of possible

programs

Intervention

Activities in Each

District

Publication of

Released Versions

of HSPA


Support for students15 l.jpg
Support for Students and work?

After Identifying Students in Need:

  • Districts will provide intervention programs to assist students who are in danger of not passing.

  • Intervention programs must be aligned to the NJCCCS in LAL, math, and science.

  • Districts with high numbers of students using the SRA must engage in HS redesign.


Sra background l.jpg
SRA – Background and work?

Authorized by N.J.S.A. 18A:7C-3 in 1988:

“ Any twelfth grade student who does not meet said requirements but who has met all the credit, curriculum, and attendance requirements shall be eligible for a comprehensive assessment of said proficiencies utilizing techniques and instruments other than standardized tests, which techniques and instruments shall have been approved by the Commissioner of Education as fulfilling State and local graduation requirements.”


Concerns about sra l.jpg
Concerns about SRA and work?

  • Originally intended for “test-phobic” student population, the SRA evolved into an alternate means of satisfying the graduation test requirement for any student who failed to demonstrate proficiency on the HSPA.

  • In 2002, over 9000 students submitted SRA portfolios; by 2006 that number had grown to over 15,000, most of them general education students.


Concerns about sra18 l.jpg
Concerns about SRA and work?

  • SRA is locally administered and scored.

  • It’s difficult to ensure secure handling of test materials and consistent, accurate scoring.

  • SRA remedial classes are often associated with rote learning and teaching.

  • In some urban districts, SRA is dominant method of demonstrating proficiency.

  • Critics complain that SRA has become a “backdoor” to a diploma.


Why eliminate the sra l.jpg
Why Eliminate the SRA? and work?

  • To affirm the HSPA as the state standard for demonstrating proficiency in the CCCS for math, language arts, and science.

  • To promote rigorous standards-based classroom instruction aligned to CCCS.


Why eliminate the sra20 l.jpg
Why Eliminate the SRA? and work?

  • To demonstrate to students, parents, and educators our commitment to high quality education for all students.

  • To certify the value and meaning of a NJ high school diploma to employers and post-secondary institutions.


Sra transition timeline l.jpg
SRA Transition Timeline and work?

  • SRA Transition to Appeals Process

    • LAL: Class of 2010 (students entering grade 9 in 2006-2007) will be last class eligible to graduate via SRA (in math only).

    • Math: Class of 2011 (students entering grade 9 in 2007-2008) will have no SRA available.


Appeals process l.jpg
Appeals Process and work?

  • DOE recommends an appeal process based on:

    • Student performance in the classroom, including grades, GPA, end-of-course exams, vocational certification exams.

    • Types and levels of courses taken in LAL, math, and science.

    • Information about the individual student’s achievement in the context of that student’s peer group.

    • Student attendance.


Appeals process23 l.jpg
Appeals Process and work?

  • Appeals process ensures fairness to individual students, families, and schools.

  • Appeals process does not undermine rigor of CCCS or HSPA as state standard for demonstrating proficiency.

  • Student support mechanisms focus on real student achievement anchored in the CCCS.


Appeals process24 l.jpg
Appeals Process and work?

  • Available to students in grade 12 starting the year the SRA content area is phased out.

    • LAL 2010

    • Math 2011


ad