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Mini-book Page 1 Structure in poetry:. Line Line break: where the poet chooses to end a line End-stopped: line ends with a comma, period, dash, semicolon, or other punctuation mark Used to ________________________________________________

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mini book page 1 structure in poetry
Mini-book Page 1Structure in poetry:
  • Line
  • Line break: where the poet chooses to end a line
    • End-stopped: line ends with a comma, period, dash, semicolon, or other punctuation mark
      • Used to ________________________________________________
    • Enjambment: sentence or clause runs onto next line without a stop
      • Used to ________________________________________________
  • Stanza: group of lines
poems with unique structures
Poems with unique structures:
  • Poems we already wrote
  • “l(a” by e. e. cummings: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXP-7byD7fo
  • “Women” by Alice Walker: p. 327
  • “Astonishment” by WislawaSzymborska: p. 330
  • Exit Ticket Assignment: Choose ONE:
    • Rewrite “Women” in prose (paragraph) form; add punctuation where you see fit. Answer this question below the rewritten poem: How did your changes affect the poem?

OR

    • Rewrite “Astonishment” as a declarative poem with all statements and no questions. Answer this question below the rewritten poem: How did your changes affect the poem?
poems with unique structures1
Poems with unique structures:

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mini book page 2 sound devices in poetry
Mini-book Page 2Sound devices in poetry:
  • Alliteration: repetition of initial consonant sounds
    • Example= Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
  • Onomatopoeia: use of words that sound like the actual sounds they describe
    • Examples= buzz, hiss, pop, pow, whap, animal sounds
    • “Cassette” by Brave New Voices: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHPH7bcUzJM
mini book page 2 sound devices in poetry1
Mini-book Page 2Sound devices in poetry:
  • Rhyme: words with the same terminal sound
    • Rhyme scheme: pattern of rhyme; labeled with letters
      • couplet: two successive rhymed lines of equal length (rhyme scheme= aa)
      • quatrain: four successive rhymed lines of equal length (rhyme scheme may vary)
  • Rhythm: pattern of sound created by rhyme, repetition, line lengths, emphasis on syllables, etc.
poems with sound devices
Poems with sound devices:
    • “Summer” p. 927
  • Group Activity: Read your assigned poem aloud. List the last word of each line on your white board. Label the rhyme scheme with letters.
    • “Maggie and milly and molly and may” p. 329
    • “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” p. 897-898
    • “Woman’s Work” p. 920
    • “Sonnet 30” p. 960
mini book page 3 figurative language in poetry
Mini-book Page 3Figurative language in poetry:
  • Figurative language: general term for words that communicate ideas beyond their literal meaning; often create vivid impressions by setting up comparisons between dissimilar things: “The Road Not Taken” p. 188-189
    • Examples: I’m so hungry I could eat a horse! Go jump off a cliff!
  • Simile: comparison using “like,” “as,” or “than”
    • Examples: He is as tall as a tree. He is like a tall tree.
  • Metaphor: comparison between two dissimilar items without using “like,” “as,” or “than”; figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance
    • Examples: He is a tall tree. He has the height of the tallest trees in the forest.
individual activity writing similes and metaphors
Individual Activity:Writing Similes and Metaphors

Metaphors:

Similes:

  • I’m thinking about you like ________.
  • This week has made me feel like ________.
  • My best friend looks like ________.
  • I sing better than ________.
  • My worst enemy is ________.
  • The person I love the most is ________.
  • My family members are ________.
  • The students in this class are ________.
poems with similes and metaphors
Poems with similes and metaphors:
  • “Dream Deferred” by Langston Hughes p. 904
    • Does the poem use similes, metaphors, or both?
    • What items is a dream deferred compared to?
  • “Dreams” by Langston Hughes p. 905
      • Does the poem use similes, metaphors, or both?
      • What items are dreams compared to?
  • “The Eagle” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson p. 906 
      • Does the poem use similes, metaphors, or both?
      • What item is the eagle compared to?
  • “‘Hope’ is the thing with feathers” by Emily Dickinson p. 908
    • Does the poem use similes, metaphors, or both?
    • What item is hope compared to?

What is the poet’s purpose for making each comparison?

group activity object idea metaphor
Group Activity:Object-Idea-Metaphor

You will receive an object and an idea.

1) Create a comparison chart for the object and idea (at least four bullets).

Example:

group activity cont object idea metaphor
Group Activity: (cont.)Object-Idea-Metaphor

2) Write metaphors using the information in your chart (at least four sentences).

Examples:

  • A mind is a sponge that absorbs knowledge.
  • A mind is a sponge that holds knowledge.
  • A mind is a sponge because it can be brain-”washed.”
  • A mind is a sponge because dries up when it is not used.
mini book page 4 figurative language in poetry continued
Mini-book Page 4Figurative language in poetry (continued):
  • Imagery: use of language to create word pictures in a readers mind; vivid description that appeals to one or more of the senses (sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste, or feeling)
  • Personification: giving human characteristics to nonhuman animals, objects, or ideas
poems with imagery and personification
Poems with imagery and personification:

Read two of the poems below. Copy some lines from each poem, and explain why you believe the lines show imagery or personification.

  • “Spearthrower” p. 231
  • “Fifteen” p. 286
  • “Combing” p. 326
  • “Gifts” p. 505
  • “Blackberry Eating” p. 914
  • “Memory” p. 915
  • “Eulogy for a Hermit Crab” p. 916
  • “Meciendo/Rocking” p. 918-919
mini book page 5 poetic devices that create meaning
Mini-book Page 5Poetic devices that create meaning:
  • Speaker: narrator of poem; persona the author creates
  • Theme: poet’s main message communicated through the poem; general statement about life
  • Tone: speaker’s attitude toward the subject
analyzing speaker theme and tone in poetry
Analyzing speaker, theme, and tone in poetry:
  • “So Mexicans are Taking Jobs from Americans” (handout)
  • “I Too Sing America” (handout)
  • “All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace” p. 476
mini book page 6 language devices in poetry
Mini-book Page 6Language devices in poetry:
  • Diction: word choice, including the vocabulary used, appropriateness of the words, and vividness of the language
  • Symbol: concrete object, character, figure, or color that is used to represent an abstract idea or concept
analyzing language devices in poetry
Analyzing language devices in poetry:
  • “Beware: Do Not Read This Poem” p. 124-125
  • “Slam, Dunk, and Hook” p. 228-229
  • “Sympathy” p. 292
  • “Jabberwocky” p. 400-401
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