Guide to Networking Essentials Fifth Edition

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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition. 2. Objectives. Explain the operation fundamentals of network operating systemsDescribe networking software componentsDescribe the basic steps of network operating system installationConfigure network servicesExplain network application installation

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Guide to Networking Essentials Fifth Edition

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1. Guide to Networking Essentials Fifth Edition Chapter 8 Simple Network Operations

2. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 2 Objectives Explain the operation fundamentals of network operating systems Describe networking software components Describe the basic steps of network operating system installation Configure network services Explain network application installation and configuration concepts

3. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 3 Network Operating Systems Network operating system (NOS): OS with functions that facilitate network communication, allow computer resources sharing on a network, and provide access control to those resources Interface for users and applications to access the network and its resources Introduced during the mid-1980s Handle standalone computer activities as well as communication over the network E.g., Novell NetWare, Windows Server 2000/2003, UNIX, and Linux

4. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 4 Basic Functions of an Operating System OS coordinates interaction between software applications and computer hardware Most applications are written so that they can be used only with a particular OS family Two features necessary in a NOS Multitasking: capability to support numerous processes at one time Time slicing occurs when the CPU’s computing cycles are divided between more than one task Human inability to distinguish instances of this brief time period creates the illusion of multitasking Every contemporary OS includes these functions

5. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 5 Basic Functions of an Operating System (continued) Two types of multitasking Preemptive multitasking Cooperative multitasking A true high-performance NOS must be a preemptive multitasking system All contemporary operating systems are designed to use preemptive multitasking OSs include many NOS features Some of these features are still reserved for OSs designed to be installed on a server computer

6. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 6 Software Components of Networking NOS manages computer’s activities and provides a network environment Organizes hardware into an interactive whole Coordinates/controls functions of machines/peripherals Supports security and privacy (network and users) Controls access to resources (user authentication) Advertises/manages resources (centralized directory) Provide access to shared resources NOS components: naming services, directory services, and client and server software

7. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 7 Naming Services On most networks, a name is necessary to identify and access resources of all kinds Humans recognize symbolic names more easily than numeric names Naming services translate symbolic names into corresponding network addresses This chapter explains the relationship between how Microsoft uses NetBIOS names and how the TCP/IP-based Domain Name System uses domain names

8. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 8 NetBIOS Names Names can be no longer than 15 characters Ending a name with $ prevents it from appearing in the NetBIOS browse list

9. Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 9 NetBIOS Names (continued)

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