Improving outcomes for families
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Improving outcomes for Families. Kris Krasnowski, Director for London Inclusion. Outline. Defining “troubled” families Rationale What works? Discussion points.

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Improving outcomes for families

Improving outcomes for Families

Kris Krasnowski,

Director for London

Inclusion


Outline

Outline

  • Defining “troubled” families

  • Rationale

  • What works?

  • Discussion points


Definition

A troubled family is one that has serious problems, that has immediate social and intergenerational impacts and costs local services a lot of time and money to respond or correct.

Definition

Parent based disadvantages:

5 or more

Significantly poorer life outcomes for children

But a recent study has questioned the use of these figures as the basis of the Govt intervention, see http://www.poverty.ac.uk/sites/default/files/trouble_ahead.pdf


Using govt s definition

Using Govt’s definition...

= 120,000

Almost one fifth of the troubled families are in London


Rationale

“I'm committed to transforming the lives of families stuck in a cycle of unemployment, alcohol abuse and anti-social behaviour, where children are truants from school - troubled families who cause such negativity within their communities and who drain resources from our councils...”

Prime Minister, March 2012

Rationale

Reduced life chances

Cost to society

CLG estimate cost at £9bn annually, or £75,000 per family, per year

Almost £1.6bn in London

£8bn spent on reactive measures

Only £1bn spent preventative measures

  • Children aged 13-14 from troubled families are 36 times more likely to be excluded from school;

  • Six times more likely to be in care or to have contract with police


The govt programme

The Govt Programme

  • £448m investment led by CLG’s Troubled Families Unit working closely with LAs.

  • National network of co-ordinators / trouble shooters (3 year funding settlement)

  • Payment by results scheme operated by CLG with LAs (40% Govt funded 60% LA and partners)

  • £200m ESF Families programme led by DWP


Spotlight on clg s pbr approach

Spotlight on CLG’s PbR approach

  • PbR criteria are:

    • 85% attendance at school and fewer than 3 exclusions

    • 60% reduction in anti-social behaviour across the family

    • 33% reduction in youth offending

    • Payment: £3,900

  • Plus:

    • Progress towards work (WP or ESF Troubled Families provision) = Payment: £100

  • Or:

    • One adult in family moving off benefits and into work = Payment: £4,000


What works

What works?

  • Personalised and family focussed. Range of interventions built around a family and its needs.

  • Strong partnerships across local areas drawing on range of expertise from police and social workers to housing providers and job centres.

  • Central co-ordination and local control – usually led by LA to indentify suitable families and maintain oversight.

  • Realistic objectives. Equipping parents and families to cope and move beyond existing barriers one step at a time (but it doesn’t exclude work)


Improving outcomes for families

Family Recovery Project

1. Whole view of the family - Meeting the needs of both adults and children

2. Team around the family - Unified service response

3. Two lead professionals for adults and children

4. Integrated Family Care Planadult and children’s needs - Focused on

outcomes and consequences

5. Real time intelligence function through Information Desk

6. Capacity building - Encouraging resilience

7. Swift access to adults services – Domestic Violence, Substance Misuse

and Mental Health workers

8. Intensive outreach - Fast, intensive, targeted

9. Multi agency response to crime and ASB - Both victims and perpetrators

10. Co-located, multi-agency team - All in one project

Source: Westminster Council


Questions observations

Questions / observations

  • The evidence base draws on secondary analysis of the Families and Children Study (FACS) in 2004 data – is it an accurate reflection of need? Have problems gotten worse?

  • Obvious differences between CLG’s approach and DWP’s – (devolved vs centralised) what issues does this raise? Can the two approaches work together?

  • Is there a fair funding allocation to London? £24m for ESF scheme, yet London has 19% of families = £38m?

  • Anecdotally, rumours suggest DWP’s provision is underperforming – teething trouble or something more substantial?

  • If it is underperforming what happens to underspend?


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