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Science Coach Dialogue #6 Crunch-Time. Doral Middle School February 3, 2012 Presented by Ava D. Rosales, PhD Instructional Supervisor. Welcome. Make a Name Tent and Indicate Name School Write the number (%) that represents Students proficient in science Average percent correct

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Science coach dialogue 6 crunch time

Science Coach Dialogue #6Crunch-Time

Doral Middle School

February 3, 2012

Presented by

Ava D. Rosales, PhD

Instructional Supervisor


Welcome
Welcome

Make a Name Tent and Indicate

Name

School

Write the number (%) that represents

  • Students proficient in science

  • Average percent correct

    Are we feeling Pretty Good?


Norms
Norms

  • Collaborative

  • Ownership into action

  • Actively participate

  • Consensus building

  • Helpful

  • Electronic devices

  • Restrooms


Session goals
Session Goals

  • Support coach model to improve instruction and student achievement

    • Develop scientific explanations and reasoning

    • Utilize data to identify secondary benchmarks to align with instruction

    • Share and discuss available resources to support science teaching and learning


An instructional coach serves
An Instructional Coach Serves

  • as a professional development liaison within the school to support, model, and continuously improve the instructional programs to assure academic improvement for ALL students.

  • as a stable resource at the school site to support high quality implementation of research-based instruction.

  • as a mentor in developing ideal content-rich classrooms


A coaching continuum
A Coaching Continuum

  • Coaching duties take many forms including:

    • Facilitating Workshops

               

    • Providing Demonstration Lessons; Co-teaching; Observing, Conferencing, and Debriefing

                      

    • Facilitating “teacher self-discovery”

The constant in all of these activities is that they lead to better instructional practices and higher student achievement…


Coaching Continuum

Confer,

observe, and

debrief to

improve

instruction

and student

achievement

Facilitate a

workshop

or session

to improve

instruction

and student

achievement

Provide an

observation

lesson to improve

instruction and

student

achievement with

feedback and

collaborative

input

Co-teach with

colleague to

improve instruction

and student

achievement based

on mutually agreed

upon learning goals

and success

indicators

Facilitate

action

research to

seek

resources

after reflection

to improve

instruction and

student

achievement

Facilitate a

study group

to investigate

common

interest topics

to improve

instruction

and student

achievement

Highly directive…

Highly reflective…


Using a reading strategy jigsaw
Using a Reading Strategy - Jigsaw

Jigsaw:  The Jigsaw helps students learn new material using a team approach.  Students are responsible for becoming an "expert" on one part of a lesson and then teaching it to the other members of their team.

  • Divide the sections into however many students are in each group. 

  • Have each student take one of the sections.  They are to read it and know it well - become “experts.”

  • "experts" of each individual section meet together to discuss their ideas on that particular section.

  • After group discussions, each "expert" returns to his group and relates all the information about his particular topic.

  • Source: Weber State University


Differentiating instruction
Differentiating Instruction

Presented by

Ms. Yoly McCarthy, Curriculum Support Specialist



Our work bringing it home
Our Work – Bringing it Home

It’s like herding cats sometimes


Aligning instruction with assessment

Aligning Instruction with Assessment

Secondary Science

Curriculum and Instruction



Activity
Activity

Using FCAT 2.0 Test Item Specifications

  • Identify key components for middle school:

    • What should students be able to do?

  • What instructional strategies should be used?

  • Identify grade level(s) responsible for instruction


Nature of science middle school science reporting category
Nature of ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 1 The Practice of Science

  • Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation.

  • The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of "the scientific method."

  • Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.

  • Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.


Nature of science middle school science reporting category1
Nature of ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 2: The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge

  • Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion.

  • Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change.

  • Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.


Nature of science middle school science reporting category2
Nature of ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 3: The Role of Theories, Laws, Hypotheses, and Models

  • The terms that describe examples of scientific knowledge, for example; "theory," "law," "hypothesis," and "model" have very specific meanings and functions within science.


Nature of science middle school science reporting category3
Nature of ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 4: Science and Society

  • As tomorrows citizens, students should be able to identify issues about which society could provide input, formulate scientifically investigable questions about those issues, construct investigations of their questions, collect and evaluate data from their investigations, and develop scientific recommendations based upon their findings.


Earth science middle school science reporting category
Earth ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 5: Earth in Space and Time

  • The origin and eventual fate of the Universe still remains one of the greatest questions in science. Gravity and energy influence the formation of galaxies, including our own Milky Way Galaxy, stars, the planetary systems, and Earth. Humankind’s need to explore continues to lead to the development of knowledge and understanding of the nature of the Universe.


Earth science middle school science reporting category1
Earth ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 6: Earth Structures

  • Over geologic time, internal and external sources of energy have continuously altered the features of Earth by means of both constructive and destructive forces. All life, including human civilization, is dependent on Earth's internal and external energy and material resources.


Earth science middle school science reporting category2
Earth ScienceMiddle School Science Reporting Category

Big Idea 7: Earth Systems and Patterns

  • The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.


Physical science ms
Physical Science (MS)

Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter

  • All objects and substances in the world are made of matter. Matter has two fundamental properties: matter takes up space and matter has mass.

  • Objects and substances can be classified by their physical and chemical properties.

  • Mass is the amount of matter (or "stuff") in an object. Weight, on the other hand, is the measure of force of attraction (gravitational force) between an object and Earth.


Physical science ms1
Physical Science (MS)

Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter

  • Matter can undergo a variety of changes.

  • When matter is changed physically, generally no changes occur in the structure of the atoms or molecules composing the matter.

  • When matter changes chemically, a rearrangement of bonds between the atoms occurs. This results in new substances with new properties.


Physical science ms2
Physical Science (MS)

Big Idea 10: Forms of Energy

  • Energy is involved in all physical processes and is a unifying concept in many areas of science.

  • Energy exists in many forms and has the ability to do work or cause a change.


Physical science ms3
Physical Science (MS)

Big Idea 11: Energy Transfer and Transformations

  • Waves involve a transfer of energy without a transfer of matter.

  • Water and sound waves transfer energy through a material.

  • Light waves can travel through a vacuum and through matter.

  • The Law of Conservation of Energy: Energy is conserved as it transfers from one object to another and from one form to another.


Physical science ms4
Physical Science (MS)

Big Idea 12: Motion of Objects

  • Motion is a key characteristic of all matter that can be observed, described, and measured.

  • The motion of objects can be changed by forces.


Physical science ms5
Physical Science (MS)

Big Idea 13: Forces and Changes in Motion

  • It takes energy to change the motion of objects.

  • Energy change is understood in terms of forces--pushes or pulls.

  • Some forces act through physical contact, while others act at a distance.


Life science ms
Life Science (MS)

Big Idea 14: Organization and Development of Living Organisms

  • All plants and animals, including humans, are alike in some ways and different in others.

  • All plants and animals, including humans, have internal parts and external structures that function to keep them alive and help them grow and reproduce.

  • Humans can better understand the natural world through careful observation.


Life science ms1
Life Science (MS)

Big Idea 15: Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms

  • The scientific theory of evolution is the organizing principle of life science.

  • The scientific theory of evolution is supported by multiple forms of evidence.

  • Natural Selection is a primary mechanism leading to change over time in organisms.


Life science ms2
Life Science (MS)

Big Idea 16: Heredity and Reproduction

  • Reproduction is characteristic of living things and is essential for the survival of species.

  • Genetic information is passed from generation to generation by DNA; DNA controls the traits of an organism.

  • Changes in the DNA of an organism can cause changes in traits, and manipulation of DNA in organisms has led to genetically modified organisms.


Life science ms3
Life Science (MS)

Big Idea 17: Interdependence

  • Plants and animals, including humans, interact with and depend upon each other and their environment to satisfy their basic needs.

  • Both human activities and natural events can have major impacts on the environment.

  • Energy flows from the sun through producers to consumers.


Life science ms4
Life Science (MS)

Big Idea 18: Matter and Energy Transformations

  • Living things all share basic needs for life.

  • Living organisms acquire the energy they need for life processes through various metabolic pathways (photosynthesis and cellular respiration).

  • Matter and energy are recycled through cycles such as the carbon cycle.


Physical science middle school ms science reporting category
Physical ScienceMiddle School (MS) Science Reporting Category

Students will be able to:

  • recognize the differences between solids, liquids, and gases and particle motion.

  • contrast physical and chemical changes.

  • identify atomic structures.

  • recognize properties of waves and their movement through different media.

  • describe how energy flows through a system.

  • describe, measure, and predict the types of motion and effects of force.


Sample interventions physical science ms
Sample InterventionsPhysical Science (MS)

  • Experiment with a variety of substances to determine their physical properties and their reaction to heat and light.

  • Create charts of substances and their physical and chemical changes when mixed with other substances and explain why and how the substances change.

  • Students manipulate various waves and calculate frequency and wavelength.

    http://amazing-space.stsci.edu/resources/explorations/light/makewaves_activity1.html

  • Create and present projects that demonstrate contact forces and forces acting at a distance.


Earth and space sciences middle school ms science reporting category
Earth and Space SciencesMiddle School (MS) Science Reporting Category

Students will be able to:

  • recognize that forces within and on Earth result in geologic structures, weather, erosion, and ocean currents.

  • explain the relationship between the Sun, Moon, and Earth.

  • understand that activities of humans affect ecosystems.

  • compare and contrast characteristics of planets, stars, and satellites.


Sample targeted instruction earth space sciences ms
Sample Targeted Instruction Earth/Space Sciences (MS)

  • Students reconstruct models demonstrating the effects of forces on and within the Earth.

  • Students critique/debate the effects that human have on the ecosystem.

  • Create models of the solar system and describe their composition, general distances and interconnectedness with the sun.

    Interactive Lessons:

  • http://www.brainpop.com/science/naturalhazards/naturaldisasters/

  • http://www.learner.org/interactives/dynamicearth/


Life science middle school ms science reporting category
Life ScienceMiddle School (MS) Science Reporting Category

Students will be able to:

  • identify the structure and function of cells.

  • compare and contrast structures and functions of living things.

  • understand the importance of genetic diversity.

  • recognize how living things interact with their environments.


Sample targeted instruction life science ms
Sample Targeted InstructionLife Science (MS)

  • Create a story about the journey of a sugar molecule through the various structures of the cell and explain the function of each part of the cell. Explain what would happen to your body if certain cells, tissues and/or systems did not function properly.

  • Diagram the systems in multi-cellular organisms and explain the similarity of functions and the connections between systems within an organism.

  • Draw the possible offspring that would arise from parents that have different combinations of dominant and recessive traits. Explain why the offspring exhibit certain traits. Use the terms genotype and phenotype


Life science middle school ms science reporting category1
Life ScienceMiddle School (MS) Science Reporting Category

Students will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the structure and function of major body systems.

  • Recognize that structures, physiology, and behaviors of living things are adapted to their environments.

  • identify and explain the role of DNA.

  • explain the relationship and interdependence of all living things and their environments.


Sample intervention scientific thinking
Sample InterventionScientific Thinking

  • The students should be asked to design and write-up experiments where all factors including variables, controls, equipment, hypothesis, procedure, data, and conclusions are included.

  • While the students are conducting experiments, they must be able to explain that investigations are conducted to explore new phenomena, to check on previous results, and to test and compare theories.

  • The students should explain scientific methods and processes.

  • During experimentation, the students should explain patterns and natural events.

  • Through simple laboratory experiences such as the Acid Rain lab listed in the general resources, the students most be able to explain the interdependence of science, technology, and society.


Contemplating marzano
Contemplating Marzano

What the research says…


Research based instructional strategies for increasing student achievement
*Research-Based Instructional Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement

1. Similarities and Differences (45%)

2. Summarizing and Note Taking (34%)

3. Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition (29%)

4. Homework and Practice (28%)

5. Nonlinguistic Representation (27%)

6. Cooperative Learning (27%)

7. Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback (23%)

8. Generating and Testing Hypothesis (23%)

9. Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers (22%)

  • Research identified 9 instructional strategies that impact student achievement.

  • *Classroom Instruction that Works, Marzano, Pickering & Pollock 2001



Lab activities
Lab Activities

Grade 8 Essential Labs

  • The Martian Sun Times

  • Imaginary Alien Life Forms

  • Identify Key Components – based on FCAT 2.0 Test Item Specifications

  • Secondary benchmarks embedded



General instructional strategies and interventions for all strands
General Instructional Strategies and Interventions for All Strands

  • Use FCAT 2.0 format for all weekly tests and assessments.

  • Utilize hands-on inquiry activities to develop meaning for topics and concepts.

  • Provide graphic organizers to help students to visualize the relationship between a topic and its concepts.

  • Provide opportunities to investigate and explore concepts.

  • Conduct guided practice activities.

  • Implement Power Writing Scientific Conclusions to encourage students to expand on their writing skills (http://science.dadeschools.net).


General intervention resources
General Intervention Resources Strands

  • BBC BiteSize KSC3 http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/

  • Discovery Education (portal)

  • FCAT Explorer

    http://www.fcatexplorer.com/

  • CRISS strategies and graphical organizers

  • Annenberg Media Science Content Videos

    http://www.learner.org

  • Explorelearning Gizmos at http://www.explorelearning.com

  • NSTA Micro-Units: http://dev.nsta.org/ssc/


Assessment resources
Assessment Resources Strands

  • Florida Achieves! Focus Questions

    http://www.fcatexplorer.com/

  • ExamView (http://it.dadeschools.net )

    • BAIB (use crosswalk)

    • Textbook Items


Were we successful in
Were we successful in… Strands

  • Supporting coaching model to improve instruction and student achievement

    • Developing scientific explanations and reasoning

    • Identifying secondary benchmarks to align with instruction based on data

    • Sharing and discussing available resources to support science teaching and learning


Reflection and follow up
Reflection and Follow-up Strands

  • Reflection: Formative Assessment Strategy #28

  • I Used to Think…

  • But, Now I know…

  • Follow-up:

    Submit Action Plan with evidence

    Due: February 14, 2012

    • Fax: 305-995-7690 or email ([email protected] )


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