Promoting study skills and good academic practice
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Promoting study skills and good academic practice. Professor Graham Virgo Faculty of Law and Senior Tutor, Downing College. The need to promote study skills. The gap between school and university The ‘only one correct result’ mentality The library as a new experience

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Promoting study skills and good academic practice

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Promoting study skills and good academic practice

Promoting study skills and good academic practice

Professor Graham Virgo

Faculty of Law and Senior Tutor, Downing College


The need to promote study skills

The need to promote study skills

  • The gap between school and university

  • The ‘only one correct result’ mentality

  • The library as a new experience

  • Reliance on the Internet


Responsibility for promoting study skills

Responsibility for promoting study skills

  • Faculties and Departments

    - teaching members and Librarians

  • Colleges

    - Senior Tutors

    - Tutors

    - Directors of Studies

    - supervisors

    - Librarians


What are study skills

What are study skills?

  • Reading

  • Note-taking

  • Writing

  • Research

  • Thinking: analysis and criticism

  • Time management


Good academic practice

Good academic practice

  • Plagiarism is defined as ‘submitting as one own’s work that which derives in part or in its entirety from the work of others without due acknowledgement’.

  • 49% of respondents to a Varsity survey admitted plagiarism


Examples of plagiarism

Examples of plagiarism

  • Quoting verbatim

  • Paraphrasing another’s work without due acknowledgement

  • Using ideas taken from another

  • Cutting and pasting from the Internet

  • Submitting someone else’s work as your own

  • Collusion


Developing good academic practice

Developing good academic practice

  • Effective induction

  • Supporting students under pressure

  • Advising about use of web-based sources

  • Designing plagiarism out of the system

  • Paper mills and essay banks


Consequences of plagiarism

Consequences of plagiarism

  • Reporting plagiarism and suspected plagiarism

  • Academic integrity and references

  • Disciplinary implications:

    (i) Examination marks and awards

    (ii) University’s Courts


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