L2: The Size and Scope of the U.S. Government From Founding to the Industrial Revolution
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L2: The Size and Scope of the U.S. Government From Founding to the Industrial Revolution The Shifting Size and Scope of the National Government: Part One. Agenda Objective : To understand… How to “measure” the size and scope of the U.S. government

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L2: The Size and Scope of the U.S. Government From Founding to the Industrial Revolution

The Shifting Size and Scope of the National Government:

Part One

  • Agenda

  • Objective:

  • To understand…

  • How to “measure” the size and scope of the U.S. government

  • What the size and scope of the United States government was prior to the Gilded Age

  • Schedule:

  • Measuring the size and scope of the government

  • Group work to evaluate the size and scope of the U.S. government before the Gilded Age

  • Coming up with argument in our closing discussion

  • Homework:

  • Unit Work

  • Nothing in the Short Term

  • Thesis Work

  • Assign #9 Draft Due: Fri 1/31 by 2:30 for both classes!


Evaluating the size and scope of the us government founding to the gilded age 1776 1870s
Evaluating the Size and Scope of the US Government to the Industrial RevolutionFounding to the Gilded Age 1776-1870s

  • Today we want to provide a broad stroke overview of the size and scope of the American government from the founding period to the Gilded Age

  • To do this we will:

    • Come up with a metric for capturing the size and scope of the government

    • Use pieces of evidence from American history to evaluate the size and scope of the government from the founding to the Gilded Age

    • Develop a statement that describes the size and scope of the American government from 1776 to 1870s


Evaluating the size and scope of the us government founding to the gilded age 1776 1870s1
Evaluating the Size and Scope of the US Government to the Industrial RevolutionFounding to the Gilded Age 1776-1870s


Your task
Your Task to the Industrial Revolution

  • Now that we have developed our metric for capturing the size and scope of the government, we want to use pieces of evidence from American history to evaluate the size and scope of the government from the founding to the Gilded Age

  • Specifically…

    • Break up into pairs

    • Read about a series of events in American history from 1776 to 1870s

    • “Complete” the chart we just made

      • For each scope, is it present or absent? If present, in the size box describe the nature of government intervention in this area


Closing discussion
Closing Discussion to the Industrial Revolution

  • In what areas are the government intervening? What areas are they not?

  • What is the size of these different forms of intervention

  • Can we develop a statement that describes the size and scope of the American government from 1776 to 1870s??


Alien and sedition acts 1798
Alien and Sedition Acts (1798) to the Industrial Revolution

  • The Alien and Sedition Acts were four bills that were signed into law by President John Adams in 1798 in the aftermath of the French Revolution. Theacts allowed the president to imprison or deport aliens who were considered "dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States.“ They also restricted speech which was critical of the federal government. The acts were repealed in 1802.


Dartmouth college v woodward 1819
Dartmouth College V. Woodward to the Industrial Revolution(1819)

  • Trustees of Dartmouth College v. Woodwardwas a landmark decision from the United States Supreme Court dealing with the application of the Contract Clause of the United States Constitution to private corporations. The case arose when the president of Dartmouth College was deposed by its trustees, leading to the New Hampshire legislature attempting to force the college to become a public institution and thereby place the ability to appoint trustees in the hands of the governor. The Supreme Court upheld the sanctity of the original charter of the college, which pre-dated the creation of the State.


The panic of 1837
The Panic of 1837 to the Industrial Revolution

  • The Panic of 1837 was a financial crisis in the United States that touched off a major recession that lasted until the mid-1840s. Profits, prices and wages went down while unemployment went up. Banks collapsed, businesses failed, prices declined, and thousands of workers lost their jobs. The Van Buren administration did nothing to stop the crisis, but rather let the crisis run its course.


Dred scott v sandford 1857
Dred Scott V. to the Industrial RevolutionSandford(1857)

  • Dred Scott v. Sandfordwas a landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court held that African Americans, whether slave or free, could not be American citizens and therefore had no standing to sue in federal court, and that the federal government had no power to regulate slavery in the federal territories acquired after the creation of the United States. 


Homestead acts 1862
Homestead Acts (1862) to the Industrial Revolution

  • TheHomestead Acts were several United States federal laws that gave an applicant ownership of land, typically called a "homestead", at little or no cost. In the United States, this originally consisted of grants totaling 160 acres of unappropriated federal land within the boundaries of the public land states.


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