Appalachian legal preparation scholars alps
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 24

APPALACHIAN LEGAL PREPARATION SCHOLARS (ALPS) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 73 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

APPALACHIAN LEGAL PREPARATION SCHOLARS (ALPS). WORKSHOP #2: APPLYING SPONSORED BY THE HONORS COLLEGE AT APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY. ABOUT ALPS.

Download Presentation

APPALACHIAN LEGAL PREPARATION SCHOLARS (ALPS)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


APPALACHIAN LEGAL PREPARATION SCHOLARS (ALPS)

WORKSHOP #2: APPLYING

SPONSORED BY THE HONORS COLLEGE AT APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY


ABOUT ALPS

  • The Appalachian Legal Preparation Scholars (ALPS) program works with students who are considering a legal education to evaluate the process and the legal profession in an objective and informed manner.

  • ALPS accomplishes this in part through its monthly Workshop Series, designed to educate students on admission to law school and prospects within the legal field.


Other resources on campus

  • Government and Justice Studies

    • Provides individual advising for majors

    • Pre-Professional Legal Studies concentration

  • Sociology

    • Offers a concentration in Legal Studies

  • Career Development Center (JET Hall)

    • Internship resources

    • Career counseling (is law school right for you?)

  • Practice LSATs/Commercial Programs


Workshop #2

  • What we will cover in tonight’s workshop:

    • Preparing for the LSAT: An Overview

    • The Application Process

    • What Lawyers Do: An Introduction

    • Investing in Education: What Are Loans?

    • Joint Degrees

    • Questions


OUR FRIEND THE LSAT

  • The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is the entrance exam used in applying for law school

    • Similar in purpose to the SAT/ACT, but completely different in scope

  • The LSAT consists of five, 35-minute multiple choice sections:

    • Logic Reasoning (2)

    • Logic Games

    • Reading Comprehension

    • Experimental


OUR FRIEND THE LSAT

  • Four of the five sections count toward the score, scaled from 120 to 180

  • There is also a 35-minute writing sample section (not scored) at the end

  • Learn more at www.lsac.org


OUR FRIEND THE LSAT

  • Offered four times a year – June, September/October, December, February (test takes an entire morning or afternoon)

    • Highly recommended to take the June LSAT

    • Can retake in September/October or December if not satisfied with score

    • Can take LSAT a maximum of three times over two years without permission from LSAC

  • Try to take the LSAT only once or twice if at all possible

    • Law schools will take the higher score if there are only one or two scores (usually)

      • Some still average; check the school’s policies


STUDY FOR THE LSAT

  • Test preparation is essential

    • Plan to give yourself anywhere from 2-6 months to prepare for the LSAT

  • How you prepare is really up to your learning style

    • If you are independently driven, motivated, and organized, you may be able to study on your own with prep books and practice tests

    • If you need outside structure, then a prep course may be of more use (but it is expensive)

    • There are also plenty of web resources (TLS LSAT Preparation Section, etc.) available

    • Practice tests (when timed) are very important

      • Some are available here on campus through commercial groups


STUDY FOR THE LSAT

  • Free Prep Materials

    • Check the LSAC website for some free starting materials

    • TLS forums are a good place to get guides

      • Many of the contributors scored 170+ on the exam

  • Areas of Emphasis

    • Take a lot of practice tests at a suitable pace

      • Don’t go too fast – risk burning out

      • Don’t go too slow – risk losing patterns/information


LONG-TERM STUDY

  • Building reading comprehension

    • Vocabulary building – word-a-day options from dictionary.com, Webster’s, etc.

    • Read complex materials like The Economist, Wall Street Journal, etc.

    • Take classes that involve a lot of detailed, complex reading

    • Focus is on speed – you will only have 35 minutes for this section

      • Time yourself early, time yourself often

      • Test takers most often do poorly on this section because they run out of time


LONG-TERM STUDY

  • Preparing for Logic Games/Logic Reasoning

    • Logic Games is often considered to be the most learnable part of the test

    • Taking classes on logic, philosophy could be very useful, especially if you do not have a background with these fields

    • Practice and repetition are good ways to prepare for the logic element of the LSAT


LSAC RESOURCES

  • Law School Locator

  • Law School Guides

  • The Application Process

  • Advice


REGISTERING FOR the LSAT

  • Go to the LSAC website at www.lsac.org

  • Follow the instructions under “The LSAT” -> “LSAT Dates and Deadlines”

  • Registering for the LSAT and CAS costs $263 total

    • $139 (LSAT) + $124 (CAS)

    • $16 to submit your application to each school

    • Other costs may apply (check website)

    • Can apply for a fee waiver


WHEN SHOULD I APPLY?

  • Applications are generally available starting sometime between September 1 and October 1

  • Law schools will often allow you to apply if you are retaking the LSAT – you can tell them to hold your application until the new score is reviewed

  • ED/EA – some law schools will have Early Decision (binding?) and Early Action programs for early appliers

    • This includes a large or full scholarship at some schools (ex: Northwestern and Boston University)

    • The down side: if “binding”, a student often commits to attending regardless of scholarships

  • Schools will often send out fee waivers – if applying early, request one from the school if your numbers are competitive


What Lawyers Do

  • The Juris Doctorate (J.D.) is the primary method to be eligible for a state’s bar exam

    • Passage of a state bar exam is required to practice law in that state

    • Bar applicants must also pass an ethics exam (called the MPRE) in the vast majority of states

    • Applicants will also be subject to a character and fitness review prior to licensing

    • Check with the individual state on its requirements

    • Some states permit bar applicants to “read” the law through an apprenticeship or other method – this is rare


WHAT LAWYERS DO

  • Types of lawyer settings:

    • “BigLaw”

    • “Midlaw”

    • Small firms

    • Government (Public Defender, Prosecutor, etc.)

    • Nonprofit

    • Solo Firm

    • Non-practicing (Academic, Librarian, Consultant)


What Lawyers Do

  • The market has dramatically changed for some parts of the profession

    • Public interest jobs are very competitive due in part to BigLaw layoffs and reduced hiring

    • In 2010, only 68.4% of JD graduates found employment as a practicing attorney (requiring bar passage). 71% were full-time and permanent. Employment overall was 87.6%. (ABA Journal)

  • Government organizations are in the middle of a hiring freeze

  • This is why it is more important than ever to be competitive and recognize the risks of the profession that you are entering


Investing in Education

  • Most students will have to take out educational loans to finance their education

  • The average law student graduates with $93,000 in debt upon graduation (US News)

  • This is intended to provide a factual overview of what law school loans generally look like. Nothing here should be taken as any form of financial advice.


Types of Loans

  • Federal Loans

    • Under the Direct Stafford Loan program, graduate students can take out up to $20,500 per year in student loans

      • Historically, these loans were subsidized (interest paid while in school) up to $8,500 per year, with the remaining unsubsidized

      • Recent legislation could eliminate that distinction (all unsubsidized)

  • Grad PLUSLoans

  • Private Loans


TYPES OF LOANS

  • Grad PLUS Loans

    • Taken out when the $20,500 per year limit has been reached

    • May be subject to a credit check

    • Carries a higher interest rate

  • Private Loans

    • Not financed by the government

      Source: U.S. Federal Student Aid website, studentaid.ed.gov


REPAYMENT OPTIONS

  • Standard 10-year option

  • Extended 30-year option

  • Graduated repayment option

  • Income-Based Repayment

  • Other options (ICR)

  • Factors (deferment, forbearance, etc.)

  • DO YOUR FINANCIAL HOMEWORK


Joint Degree Programs

  • Most law schools offer some sort of joint degree program.

    • The most popular one is typically JD/MBA

    • Others may include JD/MA, JD/LLM, JD/MPA, JD/MPH, JD/MPP, JD/MEd, JD/PhD, JD/MD

      • Many schools let their students customize their degree programs

    • Benefits: Less time to complete both degrees; flexibility

    • Drawbacks: Employer’s bias (potentially); cost


Career Paths

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT WHEN CONSIDERING LAW SCHOOL


Questions?


  • Login