Middle Management Development
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Middle Management Development 4-6 May 2010. www.stir.ac.uk. Welcome. Simon Smith University of Stirling Adrian Egglestone University West of Scotland Caroline Baynham University West of Scotland. Finding your own direction. MMD ‘traffic lights’ action plan framework

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Stir ac uk

Middle Management Development

4-6 May 2010

www.stir.ac.uk


Welcome

Welcome

Simon SmithUniversity of Stirling

Adrian

EgglestoneUniversity West of Scotland

Caroline

BaynhamUniversity West of Scotland


Finding your own direction

Finding your own direction

  • MMD ‘traffic lights’ action plan framework

    • STOP doing this...

    • START doing this...

    • Think about…?

  • an opportunity for honest self-reflection

  • capture any thoughts as they occur

  • ideas for realistic actions to take away

Middle Management Development 2010


Introductions

Introductions

  • Who you are

  • Where you are from

  • What you do

  • 1 interesting fact…


Course expectations

Course Expectations

  • think about what you want to achieve over the next 2.5 days...

  • if the MMD course was a journey, what would be the signposts you’d like to see along the way ?

  • what would the landscape look like ?

  • create a team map to illustrate the places you’d like to visit


Learning outcomes

Learning Outcomes

  • Provide some reflection on a changing Higher Education environment

  • Develop your team working skills, and an understanding of your personal style

  • Enhance your ability to operate as a manager

  • Broaden your experience through networking

  • Progress your own personal and professional development plans


Issues facing higher education

Issues Facing Higher Education

Steve Burt

Deputy Principal (Strategy & Resources)

Middle Management Development Programme

4 May 2010


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The Changing Environment

  • “the modern-day manager’s mantra that we live in times of great and constant change”

  • “we perceive our environment to be in constant flux because we only notice the things that do change”

  • “the world continues to move ahead in small steps, punctuated by the occasional big one – just as it always has”

  • Huy & Mintzberg (2003)


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Stakeholder Groups

Scottish Government

Student Market(s)

Stakeholders

Society

& Organisations

Scottish

Funding Council

Other Providers

Resource Base


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Scottish Government

  • Funding Priorities

    • independent review & spending review

    • impact of “emergency budget” post Westminster elections

    • inevitable cuts in public spending

    • Government funded students – nursing, education, social work

  • Attitudes towards

    • student fees (and funding) – Browne review in England

    • direction of HE – sector & skills agenda

    • FE/HE relationship

    • four year degrees

    • number of universities

  • Election(s) Approaching


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Funding Council

  • New Horizon

    • 7th sector & light touch – what has this meant ?

    • General Fund v Horizon Fund (88.5:11.5)

  • Relationships

    • with Scottish Government

    • with Universities Scotland

  • Resourcing

    • General Fund

      • UTR – value, control (consolidation & tolerance), banding

      • REG – value, revision\updating, timing

    • Horizon Fund

      • “effective institutions” (previously “sector wide capacity”)

      • part-time & widening access premia under review


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Student Market(s)

  • “Traditional” Students

    • domestic market(s)

      • demographic downturn coming

      • expectations and demands (contacts hours, feedback,

      • flexibility)

    • international market(s)

      • long term sustainability

      • exchange rates\costs

        • host or home market delivery

        • home and other international market competition

      • visa systems & entry requirements


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Student Market(s)

  • CPD Students

    • economic climate & perceived “value” of CPD

  • Student Expectations

    • students as customers

    • information search/digestion – student to student

  • Policy Actions

    • quality assurance/enhancement

    • degree classifications

    • programme information

  • Employability


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Society & Organisations

  • Research Agenda

    • research for all or a few institutions

    • sustainability of dual support system

    • REG and REF

      • timing, composition (“impact”), conduct (citations),

      • funding availability & disciplinary weightings

  • Grant Funding

    • research councils

      • projects v programmes

      • success rates falling

      • doctoral studentships

    • other sources

      • FEC recovery & ability to fund in recession


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Other Providers

  • Intra-University Competition

    • collaboration (pooling) v competition

    • league tables

    • accreditation (professions etc)

  • Alternative Providers

    • FE provision of HE

    • private HE providers (Overseas)

  • Geographical Dimension

    • regional v national v international


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Resource Base

  • Staff

    • pay and pensions

    • succession in some subject areas

    • training and career development

    • performance management

    • number and type of staff

  • Services

    • in house v third party

    • cost of regulatory compliance

  • Infrastructure

    • funding – capital v recurrent

    • fitness for purpose

    • energy efficiency


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The Future ?

  • Is going to be:

    • interesting

    • different

    • challenging

  • But it always has been !


Lunch

Lunch


Leadership and management thinking

Leadership and Management Thinking


Leadership

Leadership

Transactional Leadership 1930’s to 1970’s

Based on the principles of creating order and maintaining the “status quo”

Focus on studying first line supervisor

1970s all change


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Leadership

  • Transformational Leadership

  • New paradigm model of leadership

  • Peter’s and Waterman’s “In Search of Excellence”

  • Heroic models dominated 1980s and 1990s


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Leadership Boas Shamir 1995

  • Distant Charismatic leaders

    • rhetorical skills

    • an ideological orientation, sense of mission

    • Persistent and consistent

    • Non conforming to social pressure

  • Close or Nearby leaders

    • Sociable

    • Open and considerate of others

    • Sense of humour

    • High level of expertise

    • Intelligent

    • Setting high standards


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Leadership

Toxic Leadership


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Jim Collins “Good to Great” 2001

1400 organisations

11 CEO met criteria

1) Unflinching believe that their company would be the best.

2) Deep personal humility


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Leadership

Leadership in the “post heroic” era,

And the concept of engagement

The importance of “nearby” leadership


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Leadership Models

  • Action Centred Leadership

    • What a leader has to do - actions

  • Engaging Leadership model

    • UK based research, focus on “nearby” manger


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Team Exercise

What makes a great leader or manager ?


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Leadership skills

  • Actions leaders need to take

  • ACHIEVE THE TASK

  • BUILD THE TEAM

  • DEVELOP THE INDIVIDUAL


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Action Centred Leadership

Achieve the Task

Build the Team

Develop

The

Individual

John Adair


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Action Centred Leadership

John Adair

Achieve the Task

specifying and agreeing objectives

reviewing progress

allocating resources

focusing effort

evaluating performance

Achieve the Task

Build the Team

Develop

The

Individual


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Action Centred Leadership

John Adair

Achieve the Task

specifying and agreeing objectives

reviewing progress

allocating resources

focusing effort

evaluating performance

Achieve the Task

Build the Team

Develop

The

Individual

Build the Team

Structure the team

build trust and inspire teamwork

create a team identity

facilitate and support team decisions

deal with conflict positively

make the most of team diversity

expand team capabilities


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Action Centred Leadership

John Adair

Achieve the Task

specifying and agreeing objectives

reviewing progress

allocating resources

focusing effort

evaluating performance

Achieve the Task

Develop

the

Individual

Individual Needs

Keep individuals informed

Clarify objectives

Provide coaching and technical training

Treat each team member as an individual

Acknowledge differences

Encourage individual to contribute fully

Build

the

Team

Build the Team

Structure the team

build trust and inspire teamwork

create a team identity

facilitate and support team decisions

deal with conflict positively

make the most of team diversity

expand team capabilities


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Action Centred Leadership

John Adair

Achieve the Task

specifying and agreeing objectives

reviewing progress

allocating resources

focusing effort

evaluating performance

Achieve the Task

Develop

the

Individual

Individual Needs

Keep individuals informed

Clarify objectives

Provide coaching and technical training

Treat each team member as an individual

Acknowledge differences

Encourage individual to contribute fully

Build

the

Team

Build the Team

Structure the team

build trust and inspire teamwork

create a team identity

facilitate and support team decisions

deal with conflict positively

make the most of team diversity

expand team capabilities


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Task

Individual

Team

Task

Task

Team

Individual

Team

Individual

ACL Distortions

Action Centred Leadership John Adair


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The Engaging Transformational Leadership Questionnaire (TLQ)™

PERSONAL QUALITIES & CORE VALUES

Being Honest & Consistent

Acting with Integrity


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The Engaging Transformational Leadership Questionnaire (TLQ)™

ENGAGING INDIVIDUALS

Showing Genuine Concern

Being Accessible

Enabling

Encouraging Questioning

PERSONAL QUALITIES & CORE VALUES


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The Engaging Transformational Leadership Questionnaire (TLQ)™

ENGAGING INDIVIDUALS

PERSONAL QUALITIES & CORE VALUES

ENGAGING THE ORGANISATION

MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER

Supporting a Developmental Culture

Inspiring Others

Focusing Team Effort

Being Decisive

Building Shared Vision

Networking

Resolving Complex Problems

Facilitating Change Sensitively


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The Engaging Transformational Leadership Questionnaire (TLQ)™

ENGAGING INDIVIDUALS

MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER

PERSONAL QUALITIES & CORE VALUES

Building Shared Vision

Networking

Resolving Complex Problems

Facilitating Change Sensitively

ENGAGING THE ORGANISATION


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The Engaging Transformational Leadership

ENGAGING INDIVIDUALS

Showing Genuine Concern

Being Accessible

Enabling

Encouraging Questioning

PERSONAL QUALITIES & CORE VALUES

MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER

ENGAGING THE ORGANISATION

Being Honest & Consistent

Acting with Integrity

Building Shared Vision

Networking

Resolving Complex Problems

Facilitating Change Sensitively

Supporting a Developmental Culture

Inspiring Others

Focusing Team Effort

Being Decisive


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Leadership Style

  • Focus on what leaders do.

  • Importance of context

    • Organisational or role demands

    • Experience of individuals

    • Commitment of individuals

    • Nature of the task

  • Style Flexibility


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Tannenbaum and Schmidt’s Continuum


Managerial styles

Managerial Styles

  • a manager can have a significant impact on employee motivation & performance

  • you as a manager create the team climate in which individuals operate

  • your style of interaction will determine how your staff respond to you

  • ...but how aware are you of your preferred ‘management style’ ?

  • please complete this short Hay MSW questionnaire (36 items)

  • ...then total your responses for columns A-F


Managerial styles1

Managerial Styles

  • Hay MSW measures your perception of how you manage in terms of 6 styles

  • Coercive

  • Authoritative

  • Affiliative

  • Democratic

  • Pacesetting

  • Coaching


Scoring the msw

Scoring the MSW

  • Exercise 1: Managerial Style, pages 4-5

  • Exercise 2: Your situation demand, pages 6-7

  • Interpreting your profiles

    • Complete grid on page 9

* Based on a sample of 16,916 managers from 16 industries


Coercive just do it the way i tell you to

Coercive “Just do it the way I tell you to”

  • Primary objective is immediate compliance

  • Very controlling, directive style

  • Focuses on what is being done wrong

  • Motivates by stating consequences of non-

    compliance

Most effective: Crisis situations, problem

staff, compliance matters

Least effective: self motivated staff, with

complex tasks, or as a long term strategy


Authoritative let me tell you where we re going as a team

Authoritative“Let me tell you where we’re going as a team”

  • Primary objective is long term direction and vision

  • Concerned with how, what and why

  • Solicits team members’ perspectives on a vision

    without losing authority

  • Uses balanced feedback to enhance motivation

Most effective: in times of change, with new team members, when manager

is perceived to be expert or source of authority

Lease effective: with very knowledgeable staff,

when trying to promote self-managed teams


Affiliative people first task second

Affiliative“People first, task second”

Most Effective: with routine tasks where

team is performing okay, dealing with personal issues,

getting conflicting groups to work in harmony

Least effective: performance issues, in crisis

situations, with task-orientated staff

  • Primary objective: creating harmony

  • Promotes friendly atmosphere in team

  • Less results driven, more emotionally tuned

  • Thrives on + feedback, avoids confrontation


Democratic let s decide together

Democratic“Let’s decide together”

  • Primary objective: building commitment and consensus

  • Invites team members to make decisions

  • Trusts that team have capability to develop appropriate direction

Most Effective: with competent staff, when

work must be coordinated together

Lease Effective: In crises, when staff not

competent or lack crucial information


Pacesetting if you can t do it right i ll do it myself

Pacesetting“If you can’t do it right ,I’ll do it myself”

Most effective: when staff also pacesetters,

with poor performers who are not improving

Least effective: when staff want access to

manager for their development, when direction of

the team is not clear

  • Primary objective: accomplishing tasks to a high standard

  • Leads by example

  • Has high standards and no time for poor performance

  • Reluctant to delegate, works individually


Coaching what did you learn what would you do differently

Coaching“What did you learn? What would you do differently?”

  • Primary Objective is long term development of team members

  • Helps I.D. strengths and weaknesses

  • Uses listening and questioning to help staff to solve their own work problems

Most effective: with motivated staff who are interested in development, when initiative required to solve problems

Least required: with new staff or staff who do not have direction, in crisis situations


Impact of hays managerial styles

Impact of Hays Managerial Styles

  • Leaders who have mastered 4 or more styles create the best business performance

  • The most effective leaders can switch flexibly between leadership styles in response to the situation

  • Authoritative, Affiliative, Democratic & Coaching styles have a positive impact on organisational climate

  • Coercive & Pacesetting can have a negative impact on the working environment

Source: Goleman, D (2000) ‘Leadership that gets results’, Harvard Business Review


Group discussion

Group Discussion

  • do you agree with your own individual profiles ?

  • any surprises within the group ?

  • how flexible are you at varying your style in situations ?

  • what are the styles that typify your organisational culture ?


Coffee

Coffee


Belbin reports

Belbin Reports

  • Belbin Self Perception Inventory (SPI)

    • Preferred Roles

    • Manageable Roles

    • Least Preferred Roles

  • Any surprises?

  • What is the distribution within your group?


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Johari Window

Feedback

Disclosure


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Belbin Reports

  • SPI only part of the picture

  • Belbin feedback reports:

  • Assessment Results in rank order

  • SPI vs Obs pie chart

  • Counselling Report

  • Character Profile

  • Personal Work Style


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Belbin Nicknames

CO/TW Counsellor

ME/IMP Planner

ME/TW Team Conscience

CO/CF Editor

SH/CF Pursuer

RI/SH Dynamo

CO/PL Navigator

CF/RI Contractor

IMP/CO Organiser

PL/CF Sculptor

IMP/ TW Conformer

SH/ IMP Task Master

SP/ CO Project Leader

IMP/ RIScout

PL/RI Explorer

SP/ SH Field Marshall

RI/CO Facilitator

PL/IMPArchitect

  • RI/SP Butterfly Collector

  • SH/CO Boss

  • ME/SP Calculator

  • PL/TW Hidden Talent

  • PL/SH Maverick

  • RI/ME Detective

  • TW/SPTechnical Support

  • SH/MEInquisitor

  • ME/CF Corrector

  • TW/CF Employee of the month

  • PL/ME Brains

  • IMP/CF Doer

  • CF/ SP Refiner

  • SH/ TW Team Captain

  • IMP/ SP Mr/Ms Fix It

  • CO/ME Judge

  • RI/TW Communicator


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Belbin Reports

  • read your own feedback reports

  • share results of full Belbin profile:

  • Are there any surprises in the pattern of the observations ?

  • What is the (revised) distribution of roles within the group ?


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celebrity belbin


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Team Activity

  • work together to create a unique team identity

  • logo should capture essence of how you want your team to be viewed by others this week

  • select one team member to ‘model’ their tee-shirt for rest of group


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Team Activity

  • work together to create a unique team identity

  • logo should capture essence of how you want your team to be viewed by others this week

  • select one team member to ‘model’ their tee-shirt for rest of group

  • Be ready to model in 30 minutes

  • All materials provided


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Team Activity

  • And the winner is….

  • Belbin Team Cominations Report

?


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Individual Action Planning

  • MMD ‘traffic lights’ framework

    • STOP doing this...

    • START doing this...

    • Think about…?

  • take a few minutes to reflect on today


Dr jim mcgeorge university secretary university of dundee

PLANNING & RESOURCESMiddle Manager Development Course: 5 May 2010

Dr Jim McGeorge

University Secretary, University of Dundee


Session aims

Session aims

  • Presentation

    • Brief overview of planning and its challenges

    • Introduce some concepts (briefly)

      • Project management

      • Risk management

      • Option appraisal

  • Case study exercise

    • Planning and resources context

    • Continue teamworking

    • Reach decisions under pressure


What is planning

What is planning?

Clarifying the goals you want to achieve and identifying the actions required to achieve them’


So it s about

So it’s about

  • Adapting to the environment

  • Deciding on priorities and setting objectives

  • Meeting those objectives

    • In a co-ordinated way

    • Using resources efficiently and effectively

  • Achieving change and competitive advantage

  • Everyone in the organisation

  • The process as much as the end product


But it s not about

But it’s not about

  • Complying with the SFC

  • Creating blue prints to follow slavishly

  • Top-down edicts

  • Leaving it to others

  • Annual cycles

  • Doing it because you have to


An approach

An approach

  • Identify mission and aims

  • Analyse current position

    • SWOT or other analysis

    • Internal and external environments

    • Supporting data and information

    • What feedback do you obtain?

  • Identify what you want to do and prioritise

  • Identify how, who and when

  • Implement and monitor progress


Importance of context

Importance of context

  • External impacts

    • Uncertainty and complexity

    • Political, social and economic environments

    • How might changes affect us?

    • Benchmark data and league tables

  • Internal issues

    • Qualitative information on ‘health’

    • Staff data, student numbers, finance

    • How measure service performance?


Key external issues some

Key external issues (some!)

  • Scottish Government

    • Student funding

    • Westminster and Holyrood elections

    • Future public sector funding

  • SFC itself

    • Horizon Fund

    • Teaching funding review

    • 10% cuts over three years..?


Key external issues some more

Key external issues (some more!)

  • Outcomes of RAE 2008 and the new REF

  • Demographic change

  • Quality assurance and enhancement: ELIR

  • Collaboration, competition, globalisation

  • Funding infrastructure

  • International student markets

  • National Student Survey

  • League tables


Links to budgets

Links to budgets

  • Income

    • Inadequate unit of resource

    • Focus on diversification

  • Expenditure

    • Staff and running costs (pensions, utilities etc)

  • The challenge of investment in infrastructure

  • Plan-led approaches

    • Align decision-making to institutional priorities

    • Resources follow priorities – incentives

    • Creates tensions

    • Implies withdrawal of resource from some


Scenario planning

Scenario planning

  • Imagining different futures

  • Realistic

    • Based on internal/external context

  • Enables prior thinking

    • What would we do if…?

  • Encourages flexibility in strategy

  • Faster to respond to future change


Risk management

Risk Management

  • Must link effectively to strategies and plans

  • Risks associated with what we want to do

    • Identify and quantify them

    • Assess their likelihood of occurring

    • Identify controls (and those responsible)

  • Institutional risk appetite

    • Residual risk acceptable or need more controls?


Project management

Project management

  • Many sophisticated techniques

  • Milestones and deadlines

  • What, by when, by who, how etc

  • Critical path analysis

  • Having (and aligning) resources

  • Importance of teamwork and the right team

  • Importance of leadership

  • Applicable to large and small

  • Many tasks are projects


An approach to decision making

An approach to decision-making

  • Could do many things, but limited resources

  • Which best aligned with strategy?

  • Which might be most successful?

  • Option appraisal

    • Can help ensure transparency

    • Can help eliminate bias

    • Generate options

    • Assess options against criteria


Assessment criteria some

Assessment criteria (some!)

  • Cheapest?

  • Highest quality?

  • Most leverage?

  • Highest profit?

  • Best written?

  • Likely to be popular?

  • Most straightforward to deliver?

  • Most strategically relevant?

  • Highest impact on reputation?

  • Most attractive to students?


Questions

Questions?


Case study

Case study

University of Braehead


Groupwork one

Groupwork one

  • University of Braehead

  • Minnie Fortune bequest of £10m

  • Review academic and administrative profile

  • Brief SWOT analysis – 15 minutes

  • Agree assessment criteria - 15 minutes

  • Report back

  • (Proposals afterwards)


Groupwork two

Groupwork two

  • Review each proposal

  • Score against assessment criteria

  • Prepare 5 minute presentation

    • Which option(s) you have chosen

    • Why you have chosen them


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Coffee


Performance management developing staff

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT & DEVELOPING STAFF

Skills for Reviewers


Exercise

Exercise

  • Think of a manager that you have not enjoyed working for – what did they do – not do, that made it an unpleasant experience to work with them?

    &

  • Think of a manager that you have enjoyed working for – what did they do and not do that made working with them enjoyable?


Performance management

Staff Need to know from you

What is my role?

What is expected of me?

What are my priorities?

How am I doing?

Where can I go from here?

How do I get there?

As a manager you must

Define the job role

Specify standards of performance

Establish SMART objectives

Know how to monitor, measure and give feedback on performance

Identify and resource staff development needs

Performance Management


Performance management1

Performance Management

Appraisals are a management tool which ignores the peculiar character of the academic world, with its penchant for peer review, collaborative decision making, the autonomy of the individual scholar, the precedence for subject over institutional loyalty, and the complexity of measuring performance.

To many outsiders, however, academia seems content to remain an unreformed and unaccountable bastion of privilege, out of tune with other public sector professionals, one in which the penchant for form filling takes precedence over genuine performance improvement, and in which underperformance is too frequently tolerated by managers, who themselves end up underperforming.


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Performance Management

‘A processwhich contributes to the effective management of individuals and teams in order to achieve high levels of organisational performance. As such, it establishes shared understanding about what is to be achieved and an approach to leading and developing people which will ensure that it is achieved’.

Armstrong, Michael and Baron, Angela.

Performance management: the new realities


Performance management2

Performance Management

The Dreaded Appraisals

An artificial implant grafted onto the existing order, that adds no value and involves filling in pointless forms for HR.

A Natural Process of Leading people

A way of managing performance throughout the year

Appropriate for managers who have an open and honest style

Its about providing support, helping people to be clear on their objectives and taking their development serious.


What is it about

What is it about?

  • Sharing – expectations, what is expected both way

  • Interrelationships – improving the quality of relationship

  • Joint process – done together

  • Planning – and expressed as objectives, key results

  • Evidence – objective criteria for success

  • Developmental – recognises career aspirations

  • Continuous – not a one-off


Benefits

Benefits

  • Alignment and focus

  • Fairness and equity

  • Focus on Development

  • Enhancing Performance

  • Preparing for the future

  • Helps build positive working relationships

  • Motivational

  • An opportunity to create a culture

    • of constructive feedback and coaching


Colleagues charter

Colleagues Charter

  • Can we agree what it is you require me to do?

  • Can we be clear on what success looks like?

  • Give me feedback

  • on how I am doing

  • Give me the

  • opportunity to

  • develop


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Performance Management

Planning

Strategic Plan

School/Dept Plan

Individual Activity Plan/Key Results

Individual Objectives

Personal Development Plan

Reviewing

Performance

Review Discussions

Reward Recommendations

Supporting

Leading and Coaching

One 2 Ones

Implementing PDP

Monitor

Performance

Freedom to achieve

Collect feedback


Planning levels

strategic/operational plans

team objectives

responsibilities (job roles) accountabilities

key result areas (KPIs)

performance standards

Planning - levels

SMART Objectives


Performance management3

Performance Management

  • Continuing accountability which does not change significantly from one review period to the next i.e. Maintenance issues...complete the monthly return . Administrative jobs will have these.

    • But do they define the performance standards? i.e ensure the monthly return is complete accuratelyand by the last Friday of each month.

  • Objectives…describes something that has to be achieved over a period of time. SMART. Often improvement focused. Need to be agreed.

    • Investigate the cost of purchasing a new software package to improve how we store data


Planning setting objectives

Planning – setting objectives

Sspecific

Mmeasurable

Aachievable/agreed

Rrealistic

Ttime bound

Complete SMART exercise in pairs


Planning

Planning

  • As part of the strategic plan your team has been given a specific objective that will involve all members of your team working hard over the next 12 months.

    • What process would you follow to achieve your objective.

  • Please discuss in your groups


Planning good practice

planning – good practice

  • Schedule an objective-setting session with the team

  • Identify measures and targets to help you all assess progress

  • With each individual agree objectives that are SMART, and identify any development or support required

  • Plan one to one reviews to monitor progress

  • Report back at team meetings on progress

  • At year end review each individuals performance

  • Prepare for your own review

  • Celebrate success


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Performance Management

Planning

Strategic Plan

School/Dept Plan

Individual Activity Plan/Key Results

Individual Objectives

Personal Development Plan

Reviewing

Performance

Review Discussions

Reward Recommendations

Supporting

Leading and Coaching

One 2 Ones

Implementing PDP

Monitor

Performance

Freedom to achieve

Collect feedback


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Performance Management

Planning

Strategic Plan

School/Dept Plan

Individual Activity Plan/Key Results

Individual Objectives

Personal Development Plan

Reviewing

Performance

Review Discussions

Reward Recommendations

Supporting

Leading and Coaching

One 2 Ones

Implementing PDP

Monitor

Performance

Freedom to achieve

Collect feedback


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Performance Management

Planning

Strategic Plan

School/Dept Plan

Individual Activity Plan/Key Results

Individual Objectives

Personal Development Plan

Reviewing

Performance

Review Discussions

Reward Recommendations

Supporting

Leading and Coaching

One 2 Ones

Implementing PDP

Monitor

Performance

Freedom to achieve

Collect feedback


Reasons to give feedback

Reasons to give Feedback

  • Likened to the guidance system on an aeroplane

  • Requires constant re-adjustment

  • Identifies impact of behaviour

  • Where given effectively can be very beneficial to individual and the University


How to give feedback

How to Give Feedback

  • Encourage self appraisal – ask them to give examples that evidence their views

  • Focus on their behaviour not personality

  • Be helpful rather than critical - talk about “room for improvement” rather than “what’s gone wrong”.

  • Be specific describe actual incidents or behaviour

  • Concentrate on areas they can do something about

  • Ensure employee completely understands what is expected of them


Video

Video

Performance Matters


Criticism 7 golden rules

Criticism– 7 golden rules

  • Do it quickly, face to face and in private

  • Agree the facts

  • Ask & listen

  • Criticise the action

  • Explain why it matters

  • Agree a remedy

  • End on a compliment


Receiving feedback

Receiving Feedback

  • Don’t be afraid of it – welcome it

  • Listen actively

  • Don’t start to justify where feedback is for improvement

  • Check your understanding

  • Remember feedback is about what you do – not who you are

  • Where constructive, accept and learn from it – don’t keep ‘chewing the cud’

  • Choose how to best use the feedback

  • Remember E/F & R =O


Skills

Skills

  • Listening Skills

  • Questioning Skills

  • Coaching Skills


Active listening

Active Listening

  • Active Listening

    • Gives full attention to speaker

    • Notices body language, tone of voice etc

    • Clarifies their understanding of what is being said

    • Attempts to see from speakers shoes

    • Does not interject

    • Suspends personal bias, values etc

    • Paraphrases and summarises


Question what barriers may there be to listening actively

Question!What barriers may there be to listening actively?


Barriers to listening

Lack of interest

Our own beliefs and attitudes

Our reactions to the speaker - what are the personal traits

Our preconceptions as to how we value the speaker

The words we hear - jargon, distinctive phrases

Physical distractions - e.g. too much noise

Worry, anxiety etc

Slipping into personal dreams

Barriers to listening


Types of question

Types of Question

  • Closed

  • Open

  • Clarifying

  • Hypothetical

  • Probing

  • Reflective


Lunch1

Lunch


Coaching skills for managers

COACHING SKILLS FOR MANAGERS


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Aims:

By the end of this session you will;

Have an understanding of what coaching is and how it fits with your role as a manager

You will be able to apply a ‘FAST’ model to your coaching

You will have a list of coaching type questions that you can apply confidently


What is your understanding of the term coaching

What is your understanding of the term ‘coaching’?


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Lee

I've been worrying all week about the way the team meeting went last Friday. I know I made a reasonably good presentation and I was well prepared for the question and answer session, however, I was amazed when Jean and Peter ganged up on me. They had a real go at my plans for ….."

Jo (Jo was not at the meeting).

"Something similar happened to me a few months ago."

"I tackled it by ….."

"From my experience it's possible that Jean and Peter were ……"

"I guess the lesson that we both can learn from the experience is ….."

"Can I suggest that you ……"

"Alternatively you might like to consider …...“

On a scale of 1 (low) and 10 (high) how useful is Jo’s style?

Please record the things you like about Jo’s approach

  &

The things you think Jo could have done better


Score 0

Score = 0

  • Coaching is about enabling an individual to find solutions, however Jo’s style is disabling

  • Coaching is about creating independence Jo’s style would cause Lee to become dependant (on Jo telling him / her what to do)

  • Jo should have been finding out more about Lee’s issues and concerns around this and then using coaching questions to move forward.


Coaching two definitions

Coaching: two definitions

“Taking people comfortably from where they are to where they want to be”

Insoo Kim Berg and Peter Szabo

“Two people working together for the benefit of one – through increasing awareness so that they can take action.”

John Leary Joyce


Fast coaching

FAST Coaching

  • Focussed

  • Action oriented

  • Solution building

  • Timely and time efficient


First coaching experience

First Coaching Experience

One person talks about something they would like to change in their life…

Coach A

Offers advice

5 minutes coaching

1 minute debrief

Coachee

discusses their issue

Coach B

Listens in silence

With minimal

interruptions

Coach C

Asks the person

Questions from

list in worksheet


Listening with intent

Listening with Intent

Type A Listening

  • Above the water line

  • Listening to Understand Content

    Type B Listening

  • Unearthing the information below the water line


Listening with intent1

Listening with Intent

Type A Listening

Encouraging

Clarifying

Reflecting back

Summarising

Empathising


Listening with intent2

Listening with Intent

Type B Listening

Energy level

Beliefs they have about themselves / situation

Emotions

Values

Body information


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Quantum Questions

What?

Where?

?

How?

When?


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The Danger of the Question Why?

Defensiveness

Magnification


Solution focussed questions

Solution Focussed Questions

What…

  • are you most worried about?

  • do you know about patterns you see in what you enjoy about the project / don’t enjoy about the project?

  • are your strengths?

  • would make you feel the project was progressing satisfactorily?

  • else you could try?

  • What else, and what else, and what else?


Solution focussed questions1

Solution Focussed Questions

How…

  • …could you increase your confidence in this area?

  • …could you raise your profile with Senior Manager?

  • … do you need to develop your management skills?

  • … can you validate your assessment?


Solution focussed questions2

Solution Focussed Questions

When…

  • ….do you feel totally engaged in your work?

  • …have you managed to keep your life / work in balance?

  • … will you make time to develop your skill in this area?

  • … are you going to start making contacts outside the department?


Solution focussed questions3

Solution Focussed Questions

Where…

  • …in this organisation have you felt most comfortable working?

  • … can you find additional sources of work?


Coaching practical

Coaching Practical

  • Each person to think of an issue they would welcome coaching on from a colleague

  • Briefly share your issue with your team so that the coach has time to prepare

  • Coach for 20 mins using techniques from the workshop

  • 10 mins debrief and feedback from coachee/coach/ observer

  • Observer to manage time and use observation sheet

  • Coach to capture main learning points on worksheet


  • Turning round a limiting belief

    Turning round a limiting ‘belief’


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    PERSONAL LEARNING LOG


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    Team Building

    • experiential learning (puttingthe theory into practice)

      • team roles, working together, problem-solving, handling change

    • five facilitators, five group exercises

    • Kolb’s Learning Cycle

      • doing, reviewing, concluding, planning/testing, …

    • an opportunity to try out roles (Hays and Belbin)

    • a chance to give each other feedback and accelerate towards being a ‘performing’ team


    Team building

    Team Building


    Teambuilding debriefing

    teambuilding debriefing

    • ‘scores on the doors’

    • self-feedback on team processes

      • co-operation & communication

      • motivation & morale

      • roles & responsibilities

      • what behaviours/values characterised your team ?

      • were there any individual acts of leadership ?


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    Individual Action Planning

    • MMD ‘traffic lights’ framework

      • STOP doing this...

      • START doing this...

      • Think about…?

    • take a few minutes to reflect on today


    Managing change martin mccrindle director of hr and organisation development university of stirling

    Managing ChangeMartin McCrindleDirector of HR and Organisation DevelopmentUniversity of Stirling


    Thoughts

    Thoughts…

    "There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things."— Niccolo MachiavelliThe Prince (1532)


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    “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change.”

    Charles Darwin


    We re celebrating our 500 th year we see industry as a transient thing

    “We’re celebrating our 500th year…we see Industry…as a transient thing”


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    Change?

    What Change?


    Thoughts1

    Thoughts…

    “Faced with the choice between changing one's mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof."— John Kenneth Galbraith


    Understanding change

    Understanding Change

    Kubler Ross Change Curve

    Moving on

    Numbness

    Shock

    Denial

    Acceptance

    Morale & Competence

    Fear

    Understanding

    Anger

    Depression

    Time


    Response to change

    Response to Change


    Change factors

    Change factors

    • Origin of Change

    • Reasons/Case for Change

    • Need for Change

    • Resource for Change

    • Resistance to Change

    • Responsibility for Change

    • Agents of Change

    • Symbolic Change


    Thoughts2

    Thoughts…

    “If you want to make enemies, try to change something” (Woodrow Wilson)


    Burning bridges

    Burning Bridges…


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    Fram


    Thoughts3

    Thoughts…

    • "Keep in mind that you cannot control your own future. Your destiny is not in your hands; it is in the hands of the irrational consumer and society. The changes in their needs, desires, and demands will tell you where you must go. All this means that managers must themselves feel the pulse of change on a daily, continuous basis.... They should have intense curiosity, observe events, analyze trends, seek the clues of change, and translate those clues into opportunities."— Michael J. Kami


    Cats and dogs

    Cats and Dogs

    “Universities and Businesses are different kinds of organisations.”

    “the answer is not to be found in borrowing the attitudes and methods of the private sector, but…in finding new ways of reconciling academic and managerial values.”

    Peter West, University Secretary, Strathclyde University, OECD paper, 2005


    Change

    Change

    • The goalposts

    • The structures

    • The systems, processes, procedures

    • The people

    • Yourself


    Productivity differences created by

    Productivity differences created by

    Job Design – 19%

    Increased job satisfaction – 16%

    Improved employee welfare – 10%

    Research & Development – 8%

    Quality Initiatives, New Technology, Competitive Strategy – 1%

    ‘Impact of People Management Practices on Business Performance’

    CIPD (Sheffield University – London School of Economics) 1998


    Thoughts4

    Thoughts…

    "It is my daily mood that makes the weather. I possess tremendous power to make life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration, I can humiliate or humour, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis is escalated or de-escalated, and a person is humanized or de-humanized. If we treat people as they are, we make them worse. If we treat people as they ought to be, we help them become what they are capable of becoming.”— J. W. Goethe


    Motivation and attitudes at work

    Motivation and Attitudes at Work


    Motivation and attitudes at work1

    Motivation and Attitudes at Work

    What is the difference between play and work?


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    Fish!


    Motivation and attitudes at work2

    Motivation and Attitudes at Work

    • Group Discussion

      • What were the key messages for you from the film?

      • What influence does your attitude have on your team?

      • What changes could you make for the better (action planning framework)


    Individual action planning 1

    individual action planning (1)

    • MMD ‘traffic lights’ framework

      • STOP doing this...

      • START doing this...

      • Think about…?

    • reflect on today

    • review your notes & observations

    • define some SMART objectives

    • highlight 6 priority commitments


    Individual action planning 2

    individual action planning (2)

    • get together with other delegates from your own university

    • share your 6 Commitments…

    • identify any obstacles to success

    • any opportunities to help each other ?


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    course evaluation & close

    • thanks for participating !

    • complete the MMD evaluation form

    • if you have any follow-up questions or feedback…

      [email protected]

      01786 466804


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