Ela teacher leader network meeting hazard community technical college february 21 2012
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ELA Teacher Leader Network Meeting Hazard Community & Technical College February 21, 2012. Keeping Students at the Heart of the Work. Your Facilitators for Today. Carole Mullins Regional Network Content Specialist, English/LA Mary McCloud KVEC Literacy Consultant Linda Holbrook

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ELA Teacher Leader Network Meeting Hazard Community & Technical College February 21, 2012

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Ela teacher leader network meeting hazard community technical college february 21 2012

ELA Teacher Leader Network Meeting Hazard Community & Technical College February 21, 2012

Keeping Students at the Heart of the Work


Your facilitators for today

Your Facilitators for Today

Carole Mullins

Regional Network Content Specialist, English/LA

Mary McCloud

KVEC Literacy Consultant

Linda Holbrook

KDE Literacy Consultant

Jennifer Carroll

Instructional Supervisor, Wolfe County Schools


Agenda

AGENDA

  • WELCOME

  • Today’s Learning Targets

  • Plan-Do-Review Reflection

  • Breakout Sessions

    • Module Creator

    • KCAS 3 Modes of Writing and LDC

    • Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning

  • LDC Module Rubric: Taking A Harder Look

  • Informational/Explanatory Writing: Introduction to Task 11, 12 &14

  • Grade Level Groups: Resources & First Steps in Developing an Informational/Explanatory LDC Task

    • Grade Level Specific KCAS Standards and CHETL

    • LDC Rubric for Informational/Explanatory Task 11, 12 & 14

  • Connections: Standards-CHETL-Assessment-Leadership

    • Leadership: Personal Goal Setting

  • Extended Learning and Closing


Today s learning targets

Today’s Learning Targets

  • I can use module creator to create and/or publish LDC modules.

  • I can make connections between LDC and the KCAS Three Modes of Writing.

  • I can articulate the Seven Strategies of Assessment forLearning and describe how they relate to components of HETL, especially rigor.

  • I can explain the criteria of informational/explanatory writing and it’s connection to CHETL.

  • I can begin the process of creating an informational/explanatory teaching task.

  • I can set personal goals and make an action plan to advance the vision of 21st century learning


Plan do review

PLAN-DO-REVIEW

Share your Plan-Do-Review work since our last meeting.

Guiding Questions

  • What information did you share?

  • How did you share the information?

  • What worked?

  • What concerns do you still have?


Three 50 minute breakout sessions

Three 50 Minute Breakout Sessions

K-5

9:30-10:20

10:30-11:20

6-8

11:30-12:20

9-12


Ela teacher leader network meeting hazard community technical college february 21 2012

12:20 – 1:05 p.m.


Plan do review1

Plan-Do-Review

Take a moment and add notes to your P-D-R

Guiding Questions

  • What information will you share?

  • How will you share the information?

  • What concerns do you still have?


We must remember that

We Must Remember That...

  • The Literacy Design Collaborative work is a 2-4 week module. 

  • It is a teaching and learning opportunity with a prompt.

  • It is COACHED INSTRUCTION FROM THE BEGINNING TO THE END.

  • It is NOT just a response to a prompt.


Be comfortable with productive struggle

Be Comfortable With PRODUCTIVE STRUGGLE!

  • LDC is a very constructivist framework. In addition to the guaranteed hardwiring of standards, a strength of the design is that it allows teachers to bring their expertise and knowledge to it.

  • But this very strength also causes some discomfort. Perceptions and past experiences must sometimes be revised in the process, and gaps in knowledge addressed.


Taking a harder look

Taking A Harder Look…


Module rubric taking a harder look guiding questions for conversation

Module Rubric: Taking a Harder Look… Guiding Questions for Conversation

  • Review Page 2 of the Handout

  • Highlight words you think are the most important


Think aloud

Think Aloud

How are a culture’s values reflected in literature? After reading a version of Cinderella from a different culture (s) write an essay that discusses the similarities and differences between each story and evaluates how they reflect which values are most important in that culture(s). Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts.

Written as an argumentation


Think aloud1

Think Aloud

After reading “The Tell-Tale Heart”, and other works by Edgar Allan Poe, write a report that defines tone and explains how Poe established tone in the text.

Readings included biographical information and other commentaries about Poe’s life and works.

Written as informational


Think aloud2

Think Aloud

What are the qualities of a good reader and a good writer? After reading Vladimir Nabokov’s essay “Good Readers and Good Writers” and other essays, write an essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text.

Written as argumentation


Think aloud3

Think Aloud

What makes a relationship enduring and mutually beneficial to both individuals? After reading ‘Romeo and Juliet’ and various informational texts about different types of relationships and marriage, write an essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). Be sure to acknowledge competing views.

Written as argumentation


Template tasks

Template Tasks

All LDC tasks require students to:

  • Read, analyze, and comprehend texts as specified by the common core

  • Write products as specified by the common core (focusing on argumentation, informational/explanatory, and narrative)

  • Apply common core literacy standards to content (ELA, social studies, and/or science)

    The tasks are designed to ensure that students receive literacy and content instruction in rigorous academic reading and writing tasks that prepare them for success in college by the end of their high school career.


Template tasks1

Template Tasks

Teachers use additional “plug and play” flexibility within the template to adjust:

  • Task level: Select level 1, 2, or 3 task

  • Reading requirements: Vary text complexity, genre, length, familiarity, etc.

  • Writing demands: Vary product, length, etc.

  • Pacing requirements: Vary workload and time allowed to complete


Basic task design process

Basic Task Design Process

Revised LDC Guidebook: Page 31


Ldc task requirements

LDC Task Requirements


Ldc task flexibility

LDC Task Flexibility


A great ldc teaching task

A Great LDC Teaching Task

  • Addresses content essential to the discipline, inviting students to engage deeply in thinking and literacy practices around that issue.

  • Makes effective use of the template task’s writing mode (argumentation, information/explanation, or narrative).

  • Selects reading texts that use and develop academic understanding and vocabulary.


A great ldc teaching task1

A Great LDC Teaching Task

  • Designs a writing prompt that requires sustained writing and effective use of ideas and evidence from the reading texts.

  • Establishes a teaching task that is both challenging and feasible for students, with a balance of reading demands and writing demands that works well for the intended grade and content.


Kcas writing standard 2

KCAS Writing Standard #2

Anchor Standard

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.


Informational explanatory writing

Informational/Explanatory Writing

  • Conveys information accurately

  • Serves one or more closely related purposes:

    • To increase reader’s knowledge about something

    • To help readers better understand a procedure or process

    • To provide readers with an enhanced comprehension of a concept

      (Appendix A)


Informational explanatory writing1

Informational/Explanatory Writing

  • Students draw from what they already know

  • Students draw from primary and secondary sources

    “With practice, students become better able to develop a controlling idea and a coherent focus on a topic and more skilled at selecting and incorporating relevant facts, examples, and details into their writing.”

(Appendix A)


Arguments and explanations each h as a different aim

Arguments and Explanations: Each Has a Different Aim:

  • Arguments seek to make people believe that something is true or to persuade people to change their beliefs or behavior.

  • Explanations…start with the assumption of truthfulness and answer questions about why or how. Their aim to make the reader understand rather than persuade him or her to accept a certain point of view.”

(Appendix A)


Organizational structures for informative writing

Organizational Structures for Informative Writing

  • Definition

  • Description

  • Procedural-Sequential

  • Synthesis

  • Analysis

  • Comparison

  • Cause/Effect


Informational explanatory definition template task 11

Informational/Explanatory Definition Template Task 11

  • Task11:After researching________ (informational texts)on________ (content),write a________ (report or substitute) that defines ________ (term or concept) and explains________ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from your research. L2 What ________ (conclusions or implications) can you draw? (Informational or Explanatory/Definition)

    Task 11 ELA Example:

  • After researching articles on modernism in American literature, write a report that defines “modernism” and explains its impact on contemporary arts. Support your discussion with evidence from your research. (Informational or Explanatory/Definition)


Informational explanatory definition template task 12

Informational/Explanatory Definition Template Task 12

  • Task 12:[Insert question] After reading________ (literature or informational texts),write a/an________ (essay, report, or substitute) that defines________ (term or concept) and explains________ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s). L2 What ________ (conclusions or implications) can you draw?(Informational or Explanatory/Definition)

    Task 12 ELA Example:

  • What is a “metaphor”? After reading The House on Mango Street and drawing from other works you’ve read this year, write an essay that defines “metaphor” and explains how authors use it to enhance their writing. Support your discussion with evidence from the texts. (Informational or Explanatory/Definition)


Informational explanatory description template task

Informational/ExplanatoryDescription Template Task

  • Task 14: [Insert question] After reading________ (literature or informational texts),write a/an________ (essay, report, or substitute) that describes________ (content) and addresses the question. Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s). (Informational or Explanatory/Description)

    Task 14 ELA Example:

  • How does Esperanza deal with her challenges as an immigrant to the United States? After reading Esperanza Rising, write an essay that describes her challenges and addresses the question. Support your discussion with evidence from the text.

    (Informational or Explanatory/Description)


Writing forms for ldc tasks

Writing Forms for LDC Tasks

  • Materials Needed:

    • List of Possible Writing Forms for LDC Tasks

    • Highlighter

  • Instructions:

    • Review each category and highlight those forms you have previously taught.

    • Review those that you haven’t taught and identify 3-5 choices that you could possibly teach.


  • Grade level groups

    Grade Level Groups

    2:00-2:10 p.m.


    Informational explanatory task connections to grade level kcas

    Informational/Explanatory Task Connections to Grade Level KCAS

    • CCSS Anchor Standards are embedded within an LDC Module for Teaching Task 2.Grade level specific KCAS must be included by the teacher.

    • Read through the deconstructed KCAS connected to Task 11, 12 and 14 Anchor Standards for your grade level.

    • REMINDER: Pay close attention to the targets. They will become part of your instructional ladder).

    • After developing your informational/explanatory task, be sure to plan for inclusion of these learning targets/deconstructed standards within your instructional ladder.


    Why are the template task scoring rubrics important

    Why Are the Template Task Scoring Rubrics Important?

    LDC template tasks use shared rubrics (scoring guides) to decide whether student work meets expectations. One scoring guide works for all argumentation tasks, another for all informational and explanatory tasks, and a third for the narrative tasks.

    Shared rubrics support teacher collaboration across grades and subjects, including:

    • Shared scoring to develop common expectations and language

    • Joint analysis of student work

    • Collaborative planning around instructional strategies and improvements


    A quick glance at the ldc scoring rubric for informational explanatory

    A Quick Glance at the LDC Scoring Rubric for Informational/Explanatory

    Informational/Explanatory

    Argumentation


    A quick glance at the ldc scoring rubric for informational explanatory1

    A Quick Glance at the LDC Scoring Rubric for Informational/Explanatory

    Informational/Explanatory

    Argumentation


    Constructing your own teaching task texts to teach

    Constructing Your Own Teaching Task: Texts to Teach

    • Literature: novels, stories, poems, plays,

    • Informational texts: Newspaper articles, journal articles, primary source documents

    • Opinion pieces: editorials, speeches, essays on an issue

    • Reference works: encyclopedias, almanacs, manuals, how-to books

    Revised LDC Guidebook: Page 18


    Revised ldc guidebook additional resource pages

    Revised LDC Guidebook Additional Resource Pages

    Task

    Ladder

    Pages: 47-48

    50-55

    Pages: 16-31

    35-37

    39

      42

      43

    45-46

    Argumentation Module Examples: Pages 66-112

    5th Grade Informational Module Example: Distributed Today


    Your turn

    Your Turn!

    Before beginning your task development you may want to:

    • Review the LDC development basics graphic (handout pg. 31) from earlier today. This lays out the fluid process/thinking that goes into designing a task.

    • Take a look at the specifications (TTC Pg. 2) – the absolute requirements – for a full completed teaching task.

    • Next, take a look at the characteristics that should be included in a great teaching task.

    • Feel free to use the blank LDC Info/Ex template provided to you today as you begin your work.


    Ela teacher leader network meeting hazard community technical college february 21 2012

    A Resource for You!

    Strategies for Engaging All Students, Building Higher-Level Thinking Skills, and Strengthening Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum

    by Dixie Lee Spiegel


    Plan do review2

    Plan-Do-Review

    Take a moment and add notes to your P-D-R

    Guiding Questions

    • What information will you share?

    • How will you share the information?

    • What concerns do you still have?


    Extended learning

    29th

    Extended Learning

    • Design an Informational/Explanatory Teaching Task (#11, 12, or 14)and bring it with you to the March meeting.


    Impact logs

    Impact Logs

    Logs should be submitted to Carole Mullins in hard copy or via e-mail at the end of each month.


    Making connections

    Making Connections


    Our next meeting

    OUR NEXT MEETING

    ELA Teacher Leader Network Meeting Hazard Community & Technical College

    9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    March 29, 2012


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