IEP Development

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What is special education?. Specially designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique needs of a child with a disabilityIt's not a place or a person.General education teachers can deliver specially designed instruction, i.e. provide special education services to children with dis

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IEP Development

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1. IEP Development Pre-K Teachers August 2006

2. What is special education? Specially designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability… It’s not a place or a person. General education teachers can deliver specially designed instruction, i.e. provide special education services to children with disabilities. B-K certified teachers are dually certified in general education & special education.

3. Special Education Special education and related services are provided in accordance with the Individualized Education Program (IEP) developed by the IEP Team. IEP “a written statement for each child with a disability that is developed, reviewed, and revised in accordance with IDEA”

4. IEP Team Members Required Members per IDEA 2004 for Preschool LEA Representative Not less than 1 Regular Education Teacher Not less than 1 Special Education Teacher/Provider Parent(s) At request of parent the part C service coordinator or others or other representatives for part C for initial meeting Others as needed… Related Service Provider(s), etc…

5. Individualized Family Service Plan For ages 3-5, team shall consider the IFSP…….and may use the IFSP as an IEP if it is consistent with state policies and agreed to by both parties. We need to use the IEP forms

6. IEPs for Preschool Children with Disabilities Draft goal sheets should be prepared prior to the meeting date and sent to the parent(s) to review Parent(s) should be given an opportunity to add to the goal sheets The goals and objectives should be functional and parents should be able to implement them at home At the IEP meeting the team may decide to change some of the goals and objectives Once the draft is accepted, indicate so on the page

7. IEPs for Preschool Children with Disabilities The present level of performance drives the IEP – for preschoolers consider how the disability affects his/her development.

8. Present Level of Performance PLOP Present Level(s) of Educational Performance: Using current evaluations (formal consideration factors, and parent concerns, write a statement of the present level major components of a present level of performance are the strengths (what the and the needs (what the student cannot do or is not doing) in a particular academic area. The strengths and needs should establish a baseline in describing where performing in a particular educational area. Example: Sam speaks using words and phrases. He doesn’t use complete sentences when speaking. He initiates and responds to greetings appropriately. He doesn’t verbally express himself to gain others attention. Instead he grabs others (e.g., hats, jackets) to initiate conversation or to join in a group.

9. Annual Goals A. Annual Goals: The needs identified in the Present Level of Educational Performance should be developed into broad, measurable annual goals that the student can reasonably be expected to accomplish within twelve (12) months. Annual goals consist of three components: 1. Academic/non-academic area 2. Direction of Change (verb) 3. Desired level of achievement/outcome (measurable). The level of achievement/outcome must be clearly stated. Example: Sam will increase his expressive language skills to initiate and join in conversations with others.

10. Benchmarks or Short Term Objectives Benchmarks of Short Term Objectives: Additional pages may be needed to complete this section. If any benchmarks or instructional objectives are transition activities, the team may indicate by an asterisk (*) if desired. Break down the annual goals into discrete, achievable components using either short-term objectives (measurable, intermediate steps) or benchmarks (major milestones) to enable the student to successfully master the annual goals. Using steps to reach the annual goal also allows the teacher(s), parent(s) or legal guardian(s) to monitor achievement of the goals during the year.

11. Short Term Objectives Short-term instructional objectives include the following components: 1. Who 2. Will do what 3. Under what conditions (optional) and 4. Level of attainment / objective criteria

12. Short Term Objectives Examples: In role-plays, Sam will use simple sentences and questions with 80% accuracy. In classroom activities he will use simple sentences and questions with 85% accuracy. Given spontaneous conversations, Sam will use simple sentences and questions 80% of the time.

13. Benchmarks Benchmarks consist of three components: 1. Who 2. Will do what 3. By what date

14. Benchmarks Examples: Sam will use simple sentences and questions in simulated (e.g., role-plays) conversation by 12/01/06. Sam will use simple sentences and questions in structured conversations (e.g., classroom activities) by 02/15/07.

15. Measuring Progress toward the Annual Goal How progress toward the annual goal is measured: Indicates the methods used to measure progress toward annual goals. Examples include: 1. Teacher made tests 2. Observational data recorded in anecdotal notes 3. Logs 4. Charts 5. Projects 6. Portfolios 7. Work samples 8. Journals 9. Audio tapes, etc.

16. Special Ed Services Every Thing Must be Data Driven

17. State Performance Plan Indicator # 6 Percent of preschool children with IEPs who received special education and related services in settings with typically developing peers (e.g. early childhood settings, home, and part-time early childhood/part-time early childhood special education settings).

18. State Performance Plan Indicator 7: Percent of preschool children with IEPs who demonstrate improved: A. Positive social-emotional skills (including social relationships); B. Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early language/ communication and early literacy); and C. Use of appropriate behaviors to meet their needs. (20 U.S.C. 1416 (a)(3)(A))

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