Gothic architecture
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Gothic Architecture . Presentation by: Meagan Dowedoff Cara Boerner. Image from: http://valetourism.net/tag/notre-dame/. History. Gothic Architecture is referred to as the “Architecture of Geometry” due to its heavy reliance on geometric properties, such as proportion and symmetry.

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Gothic Architecture

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Gothic Architecture

Presentation by:

Meagan Dowedoff

Cara Boerner

Image from: http://valetourism.net/tag/notre-dame/


History

  • Gothic Architecture is referred to as the “Architecture of Geometry” due to its heavy reliance on geometric properties, such as proportion and symmetry.

  • During the Gothic age architecture was the dominant form of art

  • It was first developed in France, c. 1140

  • “In architecture, Gothic art was at its most intellectual”


Major Characteristics

  • Buildings, especially cathedrals within the Gothic design tend to have:

  • Symmetric floor plans

  • Flying buttresses

  • Vaulted ceilings

  • Gothic arches

  • Enormous stain glass windows

  • http://www.ehow.com/info_8668480_function-stained-glass-gothic-architecture.html


Floor Plan

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Amiens_cathedral_floorplan.JPG


http://www.sacred-destinations.com/france/chartres-cathedral-photos/slides/Chartres_Plan

http://www.andrew-may.com/mm.htm


Flying Buttresses

  • “A buttress is a support built against a wall to support or reinforce it.”

  • Originally in order to get the desired height the walls would have to be thick along the base of the walls, but more was wanted.

  • They desired more height and the ability to let light in through beautiful stain glass windows.

  • http://architecture.about.com/od/buildingparts/g/buttresses.htm


  • http://physicsbuttresses.blogspot.ca/2008/12/physics-and-history-behind-buttresses.html


Flying Buttresses

  • In order to do this, gothic architects invented flying buttresses.

  • These buttresses allowed the horizontal force of the roof to go down the buttresses, releasing the force and not causing the walls to buckle under the weight.

http://www.opendimension.org/blender_en/arch_pressure.php


Gothic arches

  • The next few slides layout a proof of a property that is needed to produce the Gothic Arches.

  • http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_s6dJiNMUuWE/Sx3O3jiajoI/AAAAAAAACq4/XUamcHCi4X8/s400/t467_GothicArches.jpg


Construction of an Arbelos


An interesting feature of arbelos’


Archimedes and his propositions


R

R/2R/6 R/3


Reflecting the original circle over our midpoint line, we get our resulting Gothic arch.


The gothic arch


Rose Window Constructions

  • Rose windows are primarily constructed with a compass and a straight edge.

  • There is many constructions that are possible with only these materials.

  • We have each constructed a rose window.

  • There are detailed instructions in the binder.

  • Using only basic techniques with a compass and a straight edge these rose windows were achieved.

  • There are a number of constructions possible with only these basic tools, we have given each of you a handout that give instructions.

  • http://www.greatdreams.com/sacred/Chartres-Rose-Window.jpg


Rose window construction


Rose window construction


Rose window construction


Rose window construction


Rose window construction


References

  • Bogomolny, A. (2012) Chain of Inscribed Circles. Interactive Mathmatics Miscellany and Puzzles. Retrieved November 25, 2012 from http://www.cut-the-knot.org/Curriculum/Geometry/InversionInArbelos.shtml#theorem.

  • Bogomolny, A. (2012) Gothic Arc. Interactive Mathmatics Miscellany and Puzzles. Retrieved November 25, 2012 from http://www.cut-the-knot.org/Curriculum/Geometry/GothicArc.shtml.

  • Chiffriller, J. (n.d.). Tips & Tricks to Gothic Geometry. New York Carver. Retrieved November 1, 2012, from http://www.newyorkcarver.com/geometry/rose.htm.

  • Craven, J. (2012) What Is a “Buttress”? What is a “Flying Buttress”? About.com. Retrieved November 16, 2012 from http://architecture.about.com/od/buildingparts/g/buttresses.htm.

  • Fazio, M., Moffett, M., & Wodehouse, L. (2008). A World History of Architecture, Second Edition. McGraw-Hill Publishing.

  • Grodecki, L. (1976) Gothic Architecture. New York: Harry N. Adams Incrporated.

  • Nikolinakou, M., & Tallon, A. (n.d.) New Research in Early Gothic Flying Buttresses. University of Cambridge. Retrieved November 20, 2012 from http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/Downloads/ichs/vol-3-2347-2362-nikolinakou.pdf.

  • Norwich, J. (2003) Great Architecture of the World. China: Da Capo Press.

  • Salpietra, M. (2010) Physics of Stone Arches. Nova. Retrieved November 21, 2012 from http://www.teachersdomain.org/asset/nv37_int_arches/.

  • Schneider, M. (n.d.) Geometry of the North Rose Window of Chartes Cathedral. Constructing the Universe. Retrieved November 23, 2012 from http://www.constructingtheuniverse.com/Chartres%20Window.html.

  • Young, R. (Spring 2012) Pappus of Alexandria and the Arbelos. University of Minnesota Morris. Retrieved November 23, 2012 from http://www.morris.umn.edu/academic/math/Ma4901/Sp2012/Near/Young-near.pdf.


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