The Ingredients of Star Performance: Distinguishing Competencies

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The Ingredients of Star Performance: Distinguishing Competencies

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1. The Ingredients of Star Performance: Distinguishing Competencies

2. The Human Brain

3. Brain Activity and Performance

4. Open Loop Time: 5 Minutes Before we go further in talking about EI, it’s important to understand some of the basics about how the brain functions. Most of this research has been done in the last five years and it’s influenced McBer’s thinking, particularly on how to work with people to increase their EI. The sensory part of our brain sends messages to both the thinking part of our brain(cortex and neocortex) and the emotional part of our brain (amygdala), normally, action is taken based on input from both areas. However, when we perceive a “crisis”, our brains are designed to help us short-cut this effective, but slow, process. While the sensory part of our brain continues to send messages to both the thinking and emotional parts of the brain, the emotional part will bypass the thinking side and take action alone. Goleman calls this an “amygdala hijack” This works well in true crises when speed of action is important. Unfortunately (or fortunately), that doesn’t happen much today, so what gets interpreted as a crisis is more often a conflict in a work setting, or an unpleasant encounter with a family member, etc. In these cases, a visceral emotional reaction may not work very well. EI is learning how to recognize and manage this process in oneself and others. Trying to change our reactions doesn’t work very well if traditional “classroom training” is used; after all, it isn’t the thinking part of our brain that’s reacting in these “crisis” situations. New responses must be practiced until they are so ingrained and are so emotionally vivid, they become our “default” reaction under stress.Time: 5 Minutes Before we go further in talking about EI, it’s important to understand some of the basics about how the brain functions. Most of this research has been done in the last five years and it’s influenced McBer’s thinking, particularly on how to work with people to increase their EI. The sensory part of our brain sends messages to both the thinking part of our brain(cortex and neocortex) and the emotional part of our brain (amygdala), normally, action is taken based on input from both areas. However, when we perceive a “crisis”, our brains are designed to help us short-cut this effective, but slow, process. While the sensory part of our brain continues to send messages to both the thinking and emotional parts of the brain, the emotional part will bypass the thinking side and take action alone. Goleman calls this an “amygdala hijack” This works well in true crises when speed of action is important. Unfortunately (or fortunately), that doesn’t happen much today, so what gets interpreted as a crisis is more often a conflict in a work setting, or an unpleasant encounter with a family member, etc. In these cases, a visceral emotional reaction may not work very well. EI is learning how to recognize and manage this process in oneself and others. Trying to change our reactions doesn’t work very well if traditional “classroom training” is used; after all, it isn’t the thinking part of our brain that’s reacting in these “crisis” situations. New responses must be practiced until they are so ingrained and are so emotionally vivid, they become our “default” reaction under stress.

5. Emotional Intelligence Framework

6. The Competency Framework

7. Leadership Style Impact on Climate

8. Social Intelligence Competencies Do you understand what motivates other people, even those from different backgrounds? Do you sense other’s feelings? Do you appreciate the organization’s culture and values? Do you understand unspoken norms? Do you coach and mentor others? Do you provide feedback helpful for development? Do you solicit input from everyone? Do you support all team members and encourage cooperation?

9. Further Resources: Best Practices: www.eiconsortium.org School Programs: www.casel.org Daniel Goleman CDs and Books: www.morethansound.net Follow up: www.danielgoleman.info

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