Postmodernism
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postmodernism AVI 4M1. First, some background:. Eurocentric view of the world. Background:. Background: The traditional notion of Western Art:. Kant : Art is concerned with Truth and Beauty, and is universally understood.

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Postmodernism avi 4m1

postmodernism

AVI 4M1


Postmodernism avi 4m1

First, some background:


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Eurocentric view of the world.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

The traditional notion of Western Art:

Kant: Art is concerned with Truth and Beauty, and is universally understood.

Art is an ennobling thing; Truth and Beauty enter the soul of the receptive viewer and make him/her nobler.

Hegel: Liberal progressivism:

history (Art included) is linear; things inevitably get better.

By this way of thinking, Art improves through history.

European civilization was considered to be the best.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

Traditional Viewof Western Art:

- Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;

The Death of Socrates, David


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

Traditional Viewof Western Art:

- Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;

  • - There was one, agreed-upon notion of art; one story; a male story;


Postmodernism avi 4m1

  • There was one, agreed-upon notion of art;

  • one story;

  • a male story;

  • Augustus, Roman sculpture


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

Traditional Viewof Western Art:

- Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;

  • - There was one, agreed-upon notion of art; one story; a male story;

- Art is earnest, formal and serious;


Postmodernism avi 4m1

- Art is earnest, formal and serious;

Michelangelo Buonarroti, David


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

Traditional Viewof Western Art:

- Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;

- There was one, agreed-upon notion of art; one story; a male story;

- Art is earnest, formal and serious;

- High Art (fine art) is distinct from low art (craft and folk art).


Postmodernism avi 4m1

“High Art”

“Low Art”


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

Traditional Viewof Western Art:

- Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;

  • There was one, agreed-upon notion of art; one story; a male story;

- Art is earnest, formal and serious;

- High Art (fine art) is distinct from low art (craft and folk art).

- Art can be analyzed by using the Elements and Principles of Design.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

  • Art can be analyzed by using the Elements and Principles of Design

  • Gericault, Raft of the Medusa.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Background:

Traditional Viewof Western Art:

- Art makes the viewer nobler through Truth and Beauty;

  • There was one, agreed-upon notion of art; one story; a male story;

- Art is earnest, formal and serious;

- High Art (fine art) is distinct from low art (craft and folk art).

- Art can be analyzed by using the Elements and Principles of Design.

Art was made by primarily men, trained in a male-dominated tradition.

Art was usually made for and paid for by men in the “Establishment” (the nobility, the wealthy, the Church, the government, etc).


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Who made this?

When /where was it made?

For whom was it made?

What is its message?

Michelangelo Buonarroti,

Pieta,

1499, marble


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Modernism:While Modernist art was no longer always made for the Establishment, Avant Garde / Modernist Art hadn’t really changed that much….

  • Art still makes the viewer nobler: through the Truth of the Artist’s vision;

  • Still one, agreed-upon notion of art;

  • one story; the male artist’s story;

- Art is still earnest, formal and serious;

  • High Art (fine art) is still distinct from

  • low art (craft and folk art).

  • Art can still be analyzed by using

  • the Elements and Principles of Design.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Who made this?

When /where was it made?

For whom was it made?

What is its message?

Piet Mondrian,

Composition in Red, Yellow, Blue and Black,

1922, oil on canvas


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Modernism had two threads:

  • Expressionism

  • Dadaism

  • Cubism

  • Surrealism

  • Abstract Expressionism

  • Pop Art

Cold Modernism

Hot Modernism

  • detached; earnest; serious; formal; high/low art

  • Playful, ironic, subversive of serious earnestness; no high/low art

  • Visual/ optical: the Elements and Principles of Design fit

  • Idea-based / Conceptual: the Elements and Principles of Design don’t fit!


Postmodernism avi 4m1

  • Dadaism

  • Surrealism

  • Pop Art

Hot Modernism

  • Playful, ironic, subversive of serious earnestness; no high/low art

  • Idea-based / Conceptual: the Elements and Principles of Design don’t fit!


Postmodernism avi 4m1

  • Hot Modernism’s use of:

  • readymades /found objects;

  • chance;

  • humour / Irony;

  • the centrality of the concept,

  • redefined what art could be…

And lead to

and lead to a new tradition in art now known as…


Postmodernism avi 4m1

postmodernism

New forms of Art-making became the norm:

- Time-based art: performance, video art, installation art;

- Conceptual art (art that may not have any physical form, but rather is purely an idea);

Gary Kosuth, One and Three Chairs, 1965


Postmodernism avi 4m1

African-American

Feminist

The biggest change is that the white, male notion of art is no longer the only one;

there are now many stories - as many stories as there are artists and viewers.

Developing World

Gay / Lesbian


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Judy Chicago,

The Dinner Party


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Barbara Kruger,

You Construct Intricate Rituals


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Joyce Wieland,

Reason Over Passion


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Luis Cruz Azaceta,

Car


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Barbara Kruger,

You Construct Intricate Rituals


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Who made this?

When /where was it made?

For whom was it made?

What is its message?

Betty Saar,

The Liberation of Aunt Jemima


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Background:

Postmodernism:

  • Art does not make viewers nobler: it rather engages their intellect and imagination;

  • there is no agreed-upon notion of art;

  • there are many stories;

- Art is often playful, ironic, satirical;

  • There is no clear distinction between

  • high art and low art;

-The Elements and Principles of Design

no longer apply as they don’t address

conceptual content or context..


Deconstruction is necessary in post modern art

Deconstruction is necessary in Post Modern art:

Deconstruction means ‘taking apart’

art in order to interpret it.

Artworks are meant to be decoded and read.

Since there is no agreed-upon story anymore,

many meanings can be derived.

Context is the key to deconstruction: context refers to the conditions surrounding a person or thing.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Context

In Post Modernism we consider the context of the artwork, the artist and the viewer / critic and how all these contexts interact to create meanings.


Postmodernism avi 4m1

Deconstruction:

Context of the Artist:

>Gender / Race / Sexual orientation

> Philosophy / goals / movement

> Historical context

> Geographical context

  • Context of the Artwork:

  • >Title

  • >Medium

  • >Date (historical context)

  • >Style

  • >Size

  • >Location

  • >Content of artwork

Context of the Viewer / Critic:

>Gender / Race / Sexual orientation

> Philosophy / agenda

> Historical context

> Geographical context


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