The us constitution
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the us constitution. Layin ’ down the law. By Mr. Heberer. Table of Contents. The Task. The Articles of Confederation. Problems with The Articles. Constitutional Convention. Compromises & Concessions. Slavery Issues. Ratification & Resistance. The Bill of Rights. The Project.

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The us constitution

the us constitution

Layin’ down the law

By Mr. Heberer


Table of contents

Table of Contents

The Task

The Articles of Confederation

Problems with The Articles

Constitutional Convention

Compromises & Concessions

Slavery Issues

Ratification & Resistance

The Bill of Rights

The Project

The Game

Credits

For Teachers

Purpose

How to Use

Tips


The task 1

The Task 1

  • You will be using this courseware to actively explore different parts of the constitution

  • Some sections you will complete alone, others you will work with a partner.

  • You will be asked to read primary sources, watch videos, and listen to podcasts.

  • At the end is a quiz, a Project and a Interactive Game.

  • You may jump around, but it might be best to go in order.

1

2


The task 2

The Task 2

  • You may only take the quiz once. So make sure you have explored all aspects of this assignment before you take it.

  • The Project is a group project. Students will work in groups of three to complete the final task.

    • You will be creating your own Bill of Rights.

    • You will incorporate different elements that you have learned throughout the courseware.

  • Good Luck and Enjoy.

1

2


The articles of confederation

The Articles of Confederation

After the Revolutionary War was won, the newly independent colonies needed to establish a government.

They established the Articles of Confederation. This government was a good start. However, as you have already learned there were many problems with it.


Problems with the articles

Problems with the Articles


How would you fix them

How would you fix them?

Brainstorm on to fix the Articles?


Constitutional convention

Constitutional Convention

  • Based on the video and your knowledge of Social Studies, why did we need the Constitutional Convention?

1

2

3


Constitutional convention1

Constitutional Convention

  • After much debate, the framers decided that the Articles did not work.

  • They boarded up the windows and met secretly to draft a new constitution altogether.

  • Many issues were addressed. The main issues follow:

1

2

3


Constitutional convention2

Constitutional Convention

Who decides who makes the laws?

The first big issue was representation in the government. Remember each state wants more of a say than every other state. The founders thought representation or “having a certain number of votes” was extremely important.

1

2

3


New jersey plan vs virginia plan

New Jersey Plan VS. Virginia Plan

  • Choose which plan you wish to explore first.


New jersey plan

New Jersey Plan

  • The New Jersey Plan stated that representation in the government should be equal from state to state. All states should have an equal vote in all matters pertaining to the government.

What’s Fair?


Virginia plan

Virginia Plan

  • Although all states are important, the more people in the state the more votes they should have. Virginia has a lot of people. They should have more of a vote than other states.

What’s Fair?


What s fair

What’s Fair?

  • Compare the situation to the class.

    Different periods get to change what days we have a test. One period may have more students should they get the same vote as a period with less?

Answer the Question


So which is it

So which is it?

  • Does the New Jersey Plan win out?

  • Or

  • Does the Virginia Plan win out?

  • Pick the winner.


Wrong try again

Wrong. Try again

  • Does the New Jersey Plan win out?

  • Or

  • Does the Virginia Plan win out?

  • Pick the winner.


Wrong what

Wrong. What?

???????


Trick question

Trick Question

  • They both do!


Bicameral legislature

Bicameral Legislature

Congress

Senate

House of Representatives

Based on population

2 per state


Bicameral legislature1

Bicameral Legislature


The 3 5 s compromise

The 3/5’s Compromise

  • How did the 3/5 Compromise and the Slave Trade help make slavery permanent?

Slave Trade

3/5


The slave trade

The Slave Trade

  • How did the 3/5 Compromise and the Slave Trade help make slavery permanent?

Slave Trade

3/5


Checkpoint questions

Checkpoint Questions

  • Why was the government divided into Three branches?

  • How many houses is the legislative branch divided into?


Ratification and resistance

Ratification and Resistance

Ratification and Resistance

Federalists

Anti-Federalists

The Federalist Papers


Federalist

Federalist

  • This new form of government sharply divided people. Many opposed a strong government fearing that it would become too powerful.

  • The newly liberated American people remembered the power that the King had and were weary of giving the U.S. Government that much power.

  • Federalists believed in a strong centralized government overseeing smaller state governments.

Ratification and Resistance

Federalists

Anti-Federalists

The Federalist Papers


Anti federalist

Anti-Federalist

  • Look up in your textbook, online or in your notes and write the definition below: (if you copy it from the a source please write it in also.)

Ratification and Resistance

Federalists

Anti-Federalists

The Federalist Papers


The federalist papers

The Federalist Papers

In order to convince some of the hold-out states James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay wrote a series of publications that were aimed at trying to convince states to ratify the newly drafted constitution.

Ratification and Resistance

Federalists

Anti-Federalists

The Federalist Papers


The federalist papers1

The Federalist Papers

  • Authors

    • James Madison

    • John Jay

    • Alexander Hamilton

  • Goals and Aims

    • The Federalist papers were extremely important in convincing each state to ratify the new constitution.

Ratification and Resistance

Federalists

Anti-Federalists

The Federalist Papers


The federalist papers2

The Federalist Papers

  • Excerpts

  • "The utility of the UNION to your political prosperity"

  • "The insufficiency of the present Confederation to preserve that Union

  • "The necessity of a government at least equally energetic with the one proposed to the attainment of this object"

  • "The conformity of the proposed constitution to the true principles of republican government"

  • "Its analogy to your own state constitution"

  • "The additional security which its adoption will afford to the preservation of that species of government, to liberty and to prosperity"

  • Results

    • In order to get some of the hold out states to sign the new constitution, a bill of rights had to be added because many people feared that the new government would be too strong and take away liberties and rights.

Ratification and Resistance

Federalists

Anti-Federalists

The Federalist Papers


Adding to the constitution

Adding to the Constitution

  • Intro the Bill of Rights

    • In order to get the anti-federalists to ratify the constitution a bill of rights was added to protect certain rights.

  • It does not give rights – only protects them.

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


What rights are important to you

What rights are important to you?

  • Write down a list of rights you think the government should protect.

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


What rights would be important to the framers

What rights would be important to the framers?

  • Recall List of Intolerable Acts

  • Things done by Britain

  • Problems with the Articles

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


The bill of rights

The Bill of Rights

  • Establishment clause, freedom of religion (Free Exercise Clause), speech, and press, and peaceable assembly as well as the right to petition the government. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

  • Second Amendment – Right to keep and bear arms. A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

  • Third Amendment – Protection from quartering of troops. No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


The bill of rights1

The Bill of Rights

  • Fourth Amendment – Protection from unreasonable search and seizure. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

  • Fifth Amendment – Due process, double jeopardy, self-incrimination, eminent domain. No person shall be held to answer for any capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

  • Sixth Amendment – Trial by jury and other rights of the accused. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district where in the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defense.

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


The bill of rights2

The Bill of Rights

  • Seventh Amendment – Civil trial by jury. In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

  • Eighth Amendment – Prohibition of excessive bail, as well as cruel and unusual punishment. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

  • Ninth Amendment – Protection of rights not specifically enumerated in the Bill of Rights. The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

  • Tenth Amendment – Powers of states and people. The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


The bill of rights3

Protections

The Bill of Rights

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


Are we still granted these rights

Are We still granted these Rights?

Protections?

  • Write a paragraph supporting your answer to this question.

What rights were important to the framers?

BoR1

BoR2

Amendments

What rights are important to you?

Condensed

Does it work?

BoR3


The group project

The Group Project

  • Now with your group you will create a bill of rights for our classroom.

  • Remember, your document does not GIVE you these rights, it only PROTECTS the government from taking them away.

  • Remember this is an official document and should be written as such.


Credits page

Credits Page

  • Information about the activity will go here.

  • This is not a one day lesson. Each student must have their own computer. In some cases two students may share but beyond that the activity loses some potency.


Teacher s page

Teacher’s Page

  • This courseware is meant to give students a greater understanding of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

    • Students will learn the importance of compromising and planning in government

    • Students will learn the basis and foundations of the United States Government.

    • This courseware is non-linear. Although, it is recommended that topics be explored in order – it is not required.

Feedback Survey – Tell me what you thought of this Courseware


The us constitution

Help!!?

  • Many of the slides include screen tips to roll over in order to guide you to the right answer, or tell you what you can do.

  • Also please make sure you are using an updated version of PowerPoint. Versions older than 2000 sometimes do not work correctly.

  • Try clicking another button or restarting the courseware.


Purpose of this courseware

Purpose of This Courseware

  • The purpose of this courseware is for students to actively explore the founding of our government.

  • Students can not only learn the material they can play with it and have some fun with it.

  • This is also a way to show how to effectively use PowerPoint other than the standard linear approach.


How to use

How to Use

  • Unlike traditional PowerPoints this one is much different.

  • Navigation is more similar to a website in which information is organized by category rather than in order.

  • You can jump around using the button to navigate

    or the button if you get stuck.

    Also additional links will be available at the bottom on some slides.

Home

?


The us constitution

Tips

  • Do not panic using this courseware. When you are stuck mouse over buttons for help.

  • Screen Tips should be able to help guide you in the right direction.

  • Read all directions. Sometimes re-reading the directions will help you understand.


The us constitution

Click Here to Play!


The us constitution

The Founding

Fathers

The Constitution

The Bill of Rights

100

100

100

200

200

200

300

300

300

400

400

400

500

500

500


This founding father became the first united states president

This founding father became the first United States President


George washington

George Washington


The us constitution

He was one of the authors of the Federalist Papers, and later became our fourth president. He is considered the father of the Constitution.


James madison

James Madison


These two men proposed the 3 5 s compromise

These two men proposed the 3/5’s Compromise.


James wilson roger sherman

James Wilson & Roger Sherman

That’s what I said!

Why don’t we Compromise?


This man was a strong anti federalist and is credited with writing the declaration of independence

This man was a strong Anti-Federalist and is credited with writing the Declaration of Independence.


Thomas jefferson

Thomas Jefferson


This was alexander hamilton s pen name under the federalist papers

This was Alexander Hamilton’s pen name under the Federalist Papers.


Publius

Publius


The constitution divided power among how many branches of government and name them

The Constitution divided power among how many branches of Government? And Name them.


Three executive judicial legislative

Three – Executive, Judicial, Legislative


This plan proposed that representation be counted by population

This Plan proposed that representation be counted by Population


Virginia plan1

Virginia Plan


This plan proposed that representation be counted equally from state to state

This Plan proposed that representation be counted equally from state to state.


The new jersey plan

The New Jersey Plan


This compromise determined how to count slaves toward population

This Compromise determined how to count slaves toward population


The 3 5 compromise

The 3/5 Compromise


Name the first and last state to ratify the constitution

Name the first and last state to ratify the constitution.


De first ri last

DE - FirstRI - Last

SMALL


This ammendment states americans have the right to bear arms and protect themselves

This Ammendment states Americans have the right to bear arms and protect themselves.


This amendment protects free speech religion press the right to assembly and the right to petition

This Amendment protects free speech, religion, press, the right to assembly and the right to petition.


The first ammendment

The First Ammendment.


This amendment protects unlawful search and seizure of personal belongings

This Amendment protects unlawful search and seizure of personal belongings.


The fourth ammendment

The Fourth Ammendment


The us constitution

This Amendment protects the right to a speedy trial by jury of peers, and protects the rights of the accused.


The sixth amendment

The Sixth Amendment


The us constitution

This Amendment, referred to as the “elastic clause”, gives all other powers not mentioned to the states/or the people.


The tenth amendment

The Tenth Amendment


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