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Taylor Jeopardy. Ch. 6 The Body and Behavior Taken from Questions compiled by Sue Boland, LHU of PA Program developed by Dan Hosey, Bucknell U. and Mark Damon. Final Jeopardy. Round 1. Round 2. CNS. You’re on my last neuron. Brain stem. Peripheral. Communication. 100 200 300 400 500.

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Taylor Jeopardy

Ch. 6 The Body and Behavior

Taken from Questions compiled by Sue Boland, LHU of PAProgram developed by Dan Hosey, Bucknell U. and Mark Damon.


FinalJeopardy

Round 1

Round 2


CNS

You’re on my last neuron

Brain stem

Peripheral

Communication

100

200

300

400

500

100

200

300

400

500

100

200

300

400

500

100

200

300

400

500

100

200

300

400

500

To Round Two!


C1 - 100

100

What CNS stands for.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C1 - 200

200

The two components of the CNS.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C1 - 300

300

It covers and protects the spine.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C1 - 400

400

The weight of the adult human brain.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C1 -500

500

The explosion of electrical activity sent down an axon when a neuron sends information.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C2 - 100

100

The two main divisions of the nervous system.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C2 - 200

200

The type of nerves that carry information from the central nervous system to the body.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C2 - 300

300

You don’t have to concentrate to get this half of the PNS to work because it does so automatically.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C2 - 400

400

Name of the man who survived after and iron rod went through the frontal lobe of his brain in 1848.

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Correct Answer


C2 -500

500

Memory loss, dementia, depression, social withdrawal, plaques and tangles.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C3 -100

100

The area including the space or gap between neurons.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C3 -200

200

Chemicals released by one neuron and received by another neuron.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C3 -300

300

Disease characterized as an electrical “brainstorm”

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Correct Answer


C3 -400

400

A nerve impulse is faster if an axon has this. It protects the axon.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C3 -500

500

It isn’t a shock, but it does come about with a change in electrical voltage of a neuron.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C4 -100

100

This is the part of a neuron that sends a message (nerve impulse) to another cell.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C4 -200

200

Uses detection of radio frequency signals produced by displaced radio waves in a magnetic field.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C4 -300

300

This part of a neuron receives messages from other cells.

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Correct Answer


C4 -400

400

A collection of neurons make up one of these. They vary in length.

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Correct Answer


C4 -500

500

A lack of this insulation on neurons has been implicated in the disease, multiple sclerosis.

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Correct Answer


C5 -100

100

Electrical activity of the brain recorded with scalp or brain electrodes.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C5 -200

200

Scanning method that detects radioactive material that is injected or inhaled to produce an image of the brain.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C5 -300

300

If you are feeling sleepy, this part of the brain stem may be responsible.

Back to board

Correct Answer


C5 -400

400

In terms of location, the brain stem sits on top of this.

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Correct Answer


C5 -500

500

Not part of the brain stem, but nearby. This brain structure helps you walk straight.

Back to board

Correct Answer


DAILY

DOUBLE

Question


Two halves make a whole

Sleep & Dreaming

Midbrain

Lobes

Grab bag

200

400

600

800

1000

200

400

600

800

1000

200

400

600

800

1000

200

400

600

800

1000

200

400

600

800

1000

To Final Jeopardy!

To Round One


C6 -200

200

Brain structure that controls your drives to survive. Thirst, hunger, reproduction.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C6 -400

400

This brain structure functions something like the man at the post office that you give all your messages to.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C6 -600

600

The MASTER GLAND supervises the hormonal system.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C6 -800

800

If you can’t remember playing this game an hour later, you may have a problem with this brain structure.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C6 -1000

1000

This brain structure that deals with violent emotions. Fight or Flight

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C7 -200

200

The beat goes on in this “listening” lobe.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C7 -400

400

If the thalamus is sent images from the eyes, they will be sent to this lobe.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C7 -600

600

Goldilocks may have been using this lobe as she judged porridge to be too hot, too cold, and just right.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C7 -800

800

After a freak accident, Phineas Gage showed a change in personality when this lobe was damaged.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C7 -1000

1000

This area let’s you speak, but it’s not the area that helps you understand.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C8 -200

200

Father of Psychoanalysis?

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Correct Answer


C8 -400

400

Most people process language with this hemisphere.

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Correct Answer


C8 -600

600

When you recognize a face in a crowd you are most likely using this hemisphere. Spatial Recognition.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C8 -800

800

If a picture is shown in your left visual field, it will be processed by the occipital lobe in this brain hemisphere.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C8 -1000

1000

If you are shown a picture in your right visual field, and then are asked to draw it, you will most likely use this hand.

It may help to assume you are a split brain patient.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C9 -200

200

What is the picture in your text book of on page 321?

Correct Answer

Back to Board


C9 -400

400

It’s the stage of sleep when you are most likely to sleep walk?

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C9 -600

600

If you get in a fight you are probably short circuiting your brain to the

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C9 -800

800

The fact that students often dream about taking exams seems to support this theory of dreaming.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


C9 -1000

1000

It the theory of dreaming that says that your cerebrum is just making stories to make sense of random signals from the pons (brain stem).

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Correct Answer


C10 -200

200

It is the idea that specific areas of the brain have certain functions.

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Correct Answer


C10 -400

400

Michael J. Fox has this neurological disorder associated with the neurotransmitter dopamine.

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Correct Answer


C10 -600

600

These embryonic cells can develop into any type of cell. Research using these cells is currently controversial.

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Correct Answer


C10 -800

800

Loosely connected brain areas including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus, that are involved in emotions.

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Correct Answer


C10 -1000

1000

Do you smell? You do if this small organ near the emotional center of the brain is working.

Back to Board

Correct Answer


DAILY

DOUBLE

Question


DAILY

DOUBLE

Question




C1 - 100

100

What is:

Central nervous system?

Back to board


C1 - 200

200

What are:

The brain and the spinal cord?

Back to board


C1 - 300

300

What is:

Vertebrae

Back to board


C1 - 400

400

What is about 3 pounds or 1.4 kilograms?

Back to board


C1 -500

500

What is:

An action potential

Back to board


C2 - 100

100

What is:

The central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system?

Back to board


C2 - 200

200

What is:

Motor neurons?

(Motor neurons transmit information from the CNS to the body (via the PNS). Sensory neurons carry information from the body to the CNS, again via the PNS.)

Back to board


C2 - 300

300

What is:

Autonomic nervous system?

(Controls and regulates internal organs, glands, and blood vessels. These processes are usually automatic and involuntary.)

Back to board


C2 - 400

400

Who is:

Phineas Gage?

Back to board


C2 -500

500

What are:

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Back to board


C3 -100

100

What is:

Synapse?

(Synapse includes the space between neurons (Synaptic gap or cleft), the axon terminal, and receptor sites on the receiving cell)

Back to board


C3 -200

200

What are:

Neurotransmitters?

Back to board


C3 -300

300

What is:

Epilepsy?

Back to board


C3 -400

400

What is:

Myelin sheath

(Fatty substance that acts to insulate axon. The myelin sheath increases speed of impulse because electrical charge of nerve impulse doesn’t have to move along entire cell membrane – instead the impulse jumps from node to node, the spaces between the sheath.)

Back to board


C3 -500

500

What is:

Action potential?

(Also call a nerve impulse. When a neuron is stimulated, it’s electrical charge changes from negative to positive. The resulting electrical charge moves through the cell body and down the axon. )

Back to board


C4 -100

100

What is:

axon?

Back to board


C4 -200

200

What is:

MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

Back to board


C4 -300

300

What is:

Dendrite?

Back to board


C4 -400

400

What are:

Nerves?

Back to board


C4 -500

500

What is a:

Myelin sheath?

(Review the figure showing the parts of a neuron, including the myelin sheath.)

Back to board


C5 -100

100

What is:

An EEG? (Electroencephalography)

Back to board


C5 -200

200

What is:

PET? (postiron emission tomography)

Back to board


C5 -300

300

What is:

The pons?

(This structure is implicated in sleeping, dreaming, and waking. )

Back to board


C5 -400

400

What is:

Top of the spinal cord?

(The brain stem starts where the spinal cord ends. It is often considered to be the most primitive part of the brain.)

Back to board


C5 -500

500

What is:

The Cerebellum?

(The name comes from this structure’s resemblance to the cerebrum, although it is smaller. The cerebellum is thought to be important for coordinating motor tasks – balance, hand/eye coordination etc. The cerebellum, like it’s namesake, may also be involved in higher order cognitive functions like problem solving and understanding sensory information. )

Back to board


C6 -200

200

What is:

Hypothalamus?

(Involved in emotions and motivations related to survival including thirst, hunger, reproduction. It is the executive in charge of the hormonal system – the pituitary is it’s second in command. The hypothalamus also regulates the autonomic nervous system.)

Back to Board


C6 -400

400

What is:

Thalamus?

(Relay station for all sensory information, except smell. The thalamus directs the sensory information to appropriate parts of the cerebrum for further analysis.)

Back to Board


C6 -600

600

What is:

Pituitary gland?

Back to Board


C6 -800

800

What is:

The hippocampus?

(Functions to store new information in the brain. It is NOT where older information is stored in memory. So if your hippocampus is damaged, you might have trouble remembering this game in a couple of minutes, you would still remember older, previously formed memories.)

Back to Board


C6 -1000

1000

Who is:

Amygdala?

(This structure controls your initial emotional response to stimuli. Also involved in arousal. For example, may spur you to run in fear if you think you see a mugger behind a bush. This initial response can be changed by the cerebrum upon further analysis. For example, if you realize that the mugger is really just the wind blowing the limbs of the bush, you won’t run.)

Back to Board


C7 -200

200

What is:

Temporal?

(Located above the ears, this is where the auditory cortex is located.)

Back to Board


C7 -400

400

What is:

Occipital?

(The visual cortex is in the lobe located at the back of the cerebrum.)

Back to Board


C7 -600

600

What is:

Parietal?

(The parietal lobe contains the somatosenory cortex. Soma means body, hence this part of the cerebrum analyzes sensory information, including temperature, sent from the body to the brain.The somatosensory cortex is adjacent to the motor cortex in the frontal lobe. So if Goldilocks senses that some porridge is too hot with the somatosensory cortex, the motor cortex can quickly send out a command to spit it out.)

Back to Board


C7 -800

800

What is:

Frontal?

(This lobe has many functions including social judgment, higher-order thinking, and planning – these may account for Mr. Gage’s personality changes. This lobe is also involved in memory, and speech production. The motor cortex is also found here.)

Back to Board


C7 -1000

1000

Broca’s area?

(Located on left side of frontal lobe. An area responsible for understanding speech is on the left side of the temporal lobe, and is named Wernickes’ area.

Back to Board


C8 -200

200

Who is:

Sigmund Freud

Back to Board


C8 -400

400

What is:

Left?

(This is true even of most left handers. Broca’s area for speech production is located in the left frontal lobe. Wernicke’s area for speech comprehension is in the left temporal lobe.)

Back to Board


C8 -600

600

What is:

Right?

(The right hemisphere specializes in visual-spatial tasks, and facial recognition may be a special case of such a task. This hemisphere is less verbal than the left. Some people also believe it is more emotional and less logical than the left.)

Back to Board


C8 -800

800

Right?

(Information from the left visual field crosses over to the opposite brain hemisphere, i.e. the right. Information from the right visual field goes to the left brain.

Note that the visual field is the external visual environment, it is not your eyes. The information from the visual field is picked up by your eyes, and is then sent to the brain. )

What is:

Back to Board


C8 -1000

1000

What is:

Right hand?

(This is NOT because most people are right handed. Information from the right visual field is processed by the left brain hemisphere. The left brain controls the right side of the body. Hence, the right hand has access to the picture seen by the left brain. You may remember that the left hemisphere is not a specialist in visual-spatial tasks, so it may not be a great artist. Despite this limitation, it can create a recognizable drawing.)

Back to Board


C9 -200

200

The fat mouse

Back to Board


C9 -400

400

What is:

Stage 4?

(This is the deepest level of sleep, so it is surprising that sleepwalking and talking often occur now. The causes of sleepwalking are not completely understood, but is more common in children and is associated with illness, e.g., running a fever.)

Back to Board


C9 -600

600

What is:

The amygdala

Back to Board


C9 -800

800

What is:

Reflection of current concerns?

(Theory that our dreams reflect issues from our current life. Hence students dream about exams because they spend part of their waking hours preparing for, taking, and worrying about exams. Nonstudents are less likely to dream about exams.)

Back to Board


C9 -1000

1000

Activation-synthesis theory?

(The pons, a structure in the brain stem, is involved in sleep and dreaming. Neurons in the pons fire during sleep, hence information is sent to the brain from the pons – this is the activation. The information is random, it is not in story form. The higher order functions of our cerebrum, however, tries to make sense of those random thoughts, images, and feelings and incorporate them into a dream – this is the synthesis. This process may explain why many of our dreams are so weird.

What is :

Back to Board


C10 -200

200

What is:

Localization of function?

Back to Board


C10 -400

400

What are:

Parkinson’s disease?

Back to Board


C10 -600

600

What are:

Stem cells?

Back to Board


C10 -800

800

What is:

Limbic system?

Back to Board


C10 -1000

1000

What is:

Olfactory bulb?

(Smell is the only sense that is not relayed by the thalamus. Because the olfactory bulb is close to areas involved in emotion and memory, it makes sense that certain smells can sometimes evoke strong emotions and memories.)

Back to Board


What is the hippocampus

Final Jeopardy

What is:the hippocampus?


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