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Communication & participation. Course No. 22. Frits Hesselink . HECT Consultancy, Netherlands . 6 July 2006. Introduction Frits Hesselink (1945). 1970 University of Utrecht, Dutch Civil Law, specialisation in Public and Private International Law

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slide1

Communication & participation

Course No. 22

Frits Hesselink

HECT Consultancy, Netherlands

6 July 2006

slide2

Introduction Frits Hesselink (1945)

  • 1970 University of Utrecht, Dutch Civil Law, specialisation in Public and Private International Law
  • 1970 – 1973 Institute of International Law, University of Utrecht
  • 1973 – 1983 Curriculum development for social and environmental studies, Municipality of Utrecht
  • 1976 Co-Founder SME - Institute for Environmental Communication
  • 1983 - 1997 Managing Director SME MilieuAdviseurs
  • 1991 Deputy Chair IUCN Commission on Education and Communication (CEC)
  • 1994 – 2000 Chair IUCN CEC, IUCN Council and Bureau member
  • 1997 – Managing Director HECT Consultancy, specialised in Strategic communication, Knowledge management and Learning
  • 2004 – Co-founder World Conservation Learning Network (WCLN)
slide3
Redefining Capacity Development for the 21st Century, New Learning for Sustainable Solutions, with Keith Wheeler and Corli Pretorius, IUCN 2005

How to manage change? How to manage people? Skills and knowledge for effectiveness in communicating protected areas and biodiversity values in: Communicating Protected Areas, Editors, Denise Hamu, Elisabeth Auchincloss and Wendy Goldstein, IUCN 2004 ISBN 2-8317-0822-2

Beyond training: protected area organizations as learning organizations. Developing capacity to change towards management in partnership in: Communicating Protected Areas, Editors, Denise Hamu, Elisabeth Auchincloss and Wendy Goldstein, IUCN 2004 ISBN 2-8317-0822-2

How to manage change? How to manage people? The role of strategic communication in biodiversity communication, in: Achieving Environmental Objectives. Editors: Gillian Martin-Mehers, Denise Hamu, Elisabeth AQUCHINCLOSS AND Wendy Goldstein, IUCN 2004, ISBN 2-8317-0843-5

Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners, planning of strategic communication in: Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in East-Central Europe, major issues and model communication strategies, editor Piotr Tyszko, IUCN 2004, ISBN 2-8317-0821-4

Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in Hungary, in: Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in East-Central Europe, major issues and model communication strategies, editor Piotr Tyszko, co-authors: Bela Varga and Laszlo Zanati, IUCN 2004, ISBN 2-8317-0821-4

Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in Lithuania, in: Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in East-Central Europe, major issues and model communication strategies, editor Piotr Tyszko, co-author: Aidas Pivurinas, IUCN 2004, ISBN 2-8317-0821-4

Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in Estonia, in: Communicating Biodiversity to Private Forest Owners in East-Central Europe, major issues and model communication strategies, editor Piotr Tyszko, co-authors: Ants Varblane and Kaja Peterson, IUCN 2004, ISBN 2-8317-0821-4

ESDebate, International debate on education for sustainable development, editors Frits Hesselink, Peter Paul van Kempen, Arjen Wals, IUCN 2000, ISBN 2 8317 0527 4

Managing European learning processes towards sustainable development, in: Prospects 113 Education for Sustainable Development, Edited by Gustavio Lopez Ospina, UNESCO 2000, ISSN 0033 1538

The evolving Role of Communication as a Policy Tool of Governments, in: Communicating the Environment, edited by Manfred Oepen and Winfried Hamacher, Peter Lang 2000, ISBN 3 631 36815 1

The role of IUCN in shaping Education for Sustainability, in: Education for a Sustainable Future, edited by Keith Wheeler and Anne Perraca Bijur, Kluwer, 2000, ISBN 0 306 46420 9

Communicating nature conservation, 5 frequently made mistakes, in: European Nature, issue 2 May 1999, ECNC, ISSN 1560 - 6724

Communication an instrument of government policy, in: Planning education to care for the earth, edited by Joy Palmer e.a., IUCN 1995, ISBN 2 8317 0296 8

Selected publications

slide4

Introduction HECT Consultancy

Clients (selection)

Austrian Ministry of Youth, Family and Environment,

Brazilian Federal Ministry of Environment,

CBD Secretariat,

Council of Europe,

Dutch Automobile Association,

Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, Dutch

Ministry of Environment, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs,

European Commission,

Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs,

ITTO, IUCN, Ramsar Secretariat,

Royal Dutch Academy of Science,

Slovenian Ministry of Environment,

Spanish Ministry of Environment,

UNDP, UNESCO, World Bank,

WWF International, WWF-Brazil, WWF-China

www.hect.nl

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide5

Introduction HECT Consultancy

  • Examples of projects (selection)
  • Preparation & management of the development - with an international team of contributors and e-learning specialists - of a toolkit (hard copy and web based version) on strategic communication (art. 13 CBD) for national focal points, including demand articulation web surveys and the set up of a distribution network, Client: SCBD and IUCN (team leader)
  • Advice for the design in dialogue with major project stakeholders – government and NGOs - a communication and public awareness strategy for ARPA (Amazon Region Protected Areas), Client: WWF Brazil
  • Capacity development program on legal frameworks, communication and change management for the Pan European Biological and Landscape Diversity Strategy and Natura 2000 in 4 phases for biodiversity managers in government and in protected areas in 5 accession countries, Client: Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Netherlands
  • Communication and Public Awareness Strategy for the PARC project (Landscape approach for protected area management), Client: UNDP – GEF, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Vietnam, Hanoi

www.hect.nl

slide6

Module 22

How can the idea of establishing a PA be promoted effectively, and in which way can stakeholders participate in the development of the idea

  • Dialogues and exchange of information between different interests in transparent decision processes
  • Involvement of regional resources (knowledge, experiences, labour, ...) as early as possible
  • Analysis of potential barriers for effective stakeholder communication and participation
  • Enhancement of the quality of information
  • Interests, regional problems, threats, resentments, constraints in promoting the idea of establishinga PA – stakeholder and conflict analysis
  • Motivation of the local population by means of participation, consultation and self-determination
  • Specific instruments (e.g. empowerment strategies, workshop and education strategies, communicationdesign, virtual communication backbone, event management)

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide8

Objectives of Module

After the module the students will

Know

the different approaches for influencing knowledge, attitudes and behaviour

the difference between management objectives and communication objectives

the difference between uninformed communication approaches and strategic communication

Have understanding and a positive attitude to

invest in communication at the beginning and not end of pipe

take enough time to invest in relation management, building trust and joint planning

see a PA as a means for nature conservation and building of social capital and not as an end in itself

Be able to

do some basic strategic communication planning for the idea of a PA

analyze lessons learned in communicating protected areas

summarize basic do’s and don’ts in strategic communication

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide9

Programme for 6 July

08.30 Introductions

09.00 Homework: presentations of top ten exercises, peer review and feedback

11.00 Introduction on communicating Protected Areas by Frits Hesselink

12.00 Communication to win support for the idea of a PA, the case of Peca Topla

14.00 Working in 4 small groups on planning communication for the idea of a PA

based on real life cases – prepare a power point presentation

15.00 Presentation of group work, discussion of results

17.00 Presentation of the real life approaches in the 4 cases

18.00 Lessons learnt, evaluation and assignments

19.00 Closure

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide10
This presentation

Strategic communication – managing people’s behaviour

Communicating the idea of a PA

The case of Peca Topla

slide11

I.

Strategic communication

Managing people’s behavior

managing people
Stick - Carrot - Drum

People’s behavior is part of (social) systems

Communication and participation are

‘social instruments’

Managing people
conservation approaches people
NORMAL REFLEX

Laws, regulations, plans;

Request (often in vain) for more

money as an incentive for change;

More research on nature and

people, more pilot projects…

BUT stay behind your desks…!

RESULTS: NO CHANGE

unsolved problems, paper parks, no public

awareness, no cooperation

negative image, bad publicity

fear to meet real people

It takes more to change systems: Good

communication can help

Conservation approaches & people
slide14

Usually most managers think communication is a responsibility for the PR experts and educators…

In reality managers take many

(un-informed) communication

decisions!

slide15

Example

Communicating Biodiversity

to private forest owners

movie or innovation
Un-informed Communication approach

We need a movie to convince private

forest owners to care about biodiversity

Show the differences between clear

cutting and selective cutting

We need animation, dramatic pictures,

visuals of forest managed close to nature

When does the movie reach all 200.000

owners? What will motivate them to

watch? What will it change in them?

Strategic Communication

Introduction of a new way of forest

management, focus on pioneers

Pioneers doing successful

experiments will set the agenda

Forest Department

Use inspectors to identify potential

pioneers (opinion leaders,

academics, not dependent on forest)

Small seminars, fieldtrips, helpdesk

for ‘guided’ experiment

Movie or innovation?
what triggers change
Un-informed approach

Managers focus on media; come

up with fun idea, that captures the

imagination

Approach: convince people

individually; social environment

not analyzed

Content and message are

secondary and they cannot

answer why or what questions

Strategic communication

approach

Managers analyze social

system; plan strategically to

achieve desired outcomes

Interventions are focused on

goals - audiences and

messages determine media

Target audiences are involved in

planning; Interventions are

based on their values

What triggers change?
slide18

Trampling by visitors:threat to

Pulsatilla grandis in Boč

Strategic communication

triggers change

what laws cannot do
Previous approach:

Law enforcement, education, public

awareness, fences by PA - not being aware of

other interest groups with differentand

conflicting messages

Each year escalation of the problem and

conflictsbetween visitors and interestgroups;

and between interest groupswho all think they

have the rightsolution and approach.

Strategic communication approach:

Bring stakeholders together - focus groups to

explore motivesfor cooperation

Management plan realizing joint solutions

Joint execution of event management plan

Communication interventions (timely tailored and targetted information on event management)

Mobility interventions (ramps, parkings, busses)

Evaluation and follow-up (outsourcing event

management)

What laws cannot do!
slide20

Results of the strategic

communication approach

Boč, 1st May 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

slide21

Wolves - appearing in P.A.

Beskydy - threatened by farmers

Strategic Communication

triggers change

what money cannot do
Previous approach

Formal compensation procedures

Publications, lectures on how farmers

should protect their sheep

Communication aimed to prove through

facts and figures that wolves do not pose

a threat & press ‘has it all wrong’.

Increase of public outrage in press,

relationships worsens; farmers

propagate shooting wolves - and even PA

Staffs…!

Strategic communication approach

Overcome own fears, prejudices - visit farmers,

listen to concerns, start regular meetings with

opinion leaders on common concerns and

interests

Provide bureaucratic support for farmers’ needs,

e.g. approach municipality to improve roads;

proposal to Ministry to improve indemnity

procedure; help with procedure; support local

publication on sheep farming.

Some farmers start taking preventive measures

Joint evaluation and planning of next steps.

What money cannot do
slide23

Disappearing ecological networks

in Slovenian Karst and Istria

Strategic communication

triggers change

what research cannot do
Previous approach

Research by different organizations

funded by EU, lectures, conferences,

website, exchange with similar initiatives

in Italy and Croatia, science approach,

Laws, regulations, legal enforcement, no

restoration action

Each year more ponds are used as

garbage dump, dried up, falling apart, or

totally disappear, mapping more and

more difficult

Strategic communication approach

Opinion leaders, Focus groups. Motives fornew

use ofponds

Management plan realizing joint solutions, joint

execution of plan

Communication interventions (timely tailored and targetted information on opening ceremony)

Technical interventions (funds, construction material, detailed technical plan, supervision ‘sustainable’ and traditional construction)

Evaluation, report recommending next steps

What research cannot do!
characteristics of strategic communication
Approaches

Face to face meetings opinion leaders

Focus groups, Kitchen meetings,

Round tables, Joint exploration

Joint strategic planning with

stakeholders of instrument mix

Free publicity, media as tools

Feedback, Adaptive management

Approaches

System approach

Marketing

Relation management

Network management

Crisis management

Customer orientation

Personal approach

Characteristics of strategic communication
slide27

2.

Communicating the idea of a PA

How can the idea of establishing a PA be promoted effectively,

and in which way can stakeholders participate in the development of the idea

How can the idea of establishing a PA be promoted effectively, and in which way can stakeholders articipate in the development of the idea

slide28

1. Dialogues and exchange of information between different interests in transparent decision processes

Dialogues - how to get started?

Stakeholder analysis identifies stakeholders as a statistic category - for a dialogue one needs to think of ‘people of flesh and blood’

Before a meaningful dialogue can start, one needs to build mutual trust and understanding.

This takes time but without such a basis of trust real information exchange is not possible. Let alone getting already into a decision making process - that is a bridge to far. Even mentioning it will be contra-productive and confirm the mistrust against ‘city people’ or ‘scientists’.

Important at this stage is to find out what psychological costs and other costs are, what fears and motives play a role, what values are important, and most importantly who are opinion leaders in the stakeholder group

A fact of life is that people - living in or near the site for which plans exist to turn it into a protected area – almost never welcome the idea of a PA right from the start. There is always some form of resistence. Often based on irrational rather than rational arguments.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide29

Involvement of regional resources (knowledge, experiences, labour, ...) as early as possible

Involvement – need for opinion leaders

Opinion leaders are people with large networks inside and outside the stakeholder group. They

like to cconnect people, and like to inform them with news that is of particular interest to them.

They are very well informed on what is going on in the stakeholder group. Their own interest goes

Well beyond that of the stakeholder group. People value their opinions and follow them ‘to places they

would not go themselves’. They are mostly not the official leaders or representatives of the group,

but often act as informal power brokers behind the scenes.

They can be identified by going to formal and informal meetings of the stakeholder group, by talking

to group members, or people knowing the group.

Once identified they can provide invaluable information (history, social complexity, values, prejudices,

etc.) on how best to proceed, either in face to face interviews or through focus groups.

Labour may sound a good incentive, opinion leaders will give the final judgement of this assumption.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide30

Analysis of potential barriers for effective stakeholder communication and participation

Analysis – Focus groups

To get a much better picture of the social and technical complexities in realizing the plan

or start a joint fact finding and planning process, focus groups is one of the best methods.

Focus groups are a means of interviewing - in a very free way - a specific stakeholder group.

The focus group usually consists of six to ten people, who are invited to spend a few hours with

a skilled moderator. This is a communication expert who must be objective, knowledgeable

on the issue and well versed in group dynamics and stakeholder behaviour.

The focus groups will provide information on barriers and opportunities for participation. Barriers

may be mistrust of ‘authorities’, ‘experts’, ‘academics’, ‘city people’. It may be fear for losing

rights, income or changing practices. Opportunities may be additional sources of income, or

other motives or opportunities for the next generation to continue living in the area.

The focus groups may also provide information how the formal process best could be structured.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide31

Enhancement of the quality of information

Information – Avoid jargon!

Experts like to talk in abstract terms (biodiversity, extinction crisis, etc.) and they often use

theoretical models (joint management planning). In giving information they mostly want to be

comprehensive (going back to the root causes or history) and like to present details (this flower

is a sub species of …etc.). They like to identify ‘pronciples’ (good practice, etc.) and to underpin

their arguments they like to refer to the opinions or work of other experts in the literature.

Non-experts like concrete information (what exactly will be the boundaries of the protected area)

They want practical information (what does it mean for my daily routine here, my income, access to

my house). They do not want comprehensive speeches or texts, but short and concise (‘superficial’

in the eyes of experts) and a general outline of the idea. They want stories or events to underpin

the arguments and they believe more their family, friends and peers as sources of information than

experts.

To enhance information the communication challenge is to bridge the gap between experts and

non-experts.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide32

Interests, regional problems, threats, resentments, constraints in promoting the idea of establishinga PA – stakeholder and conflict analysis

Situation analysis – reality check is a communication discipline

Often much of the initial ideas and planning is done in offices far away from local stakeholders

and experts have a tendency not to disclose any information until they are convinced that it

is totally scientifically sound, complete and based on proper arguments. Access to information

(maps, lists of habitat sites, species etc.) is often difficult for local groups. This is a basis for

resentment and a first obstacle once the idea for a Protected Area is made public.

In such cases experts are surprised by the opposition, as they had been researching in advance

all the possible options, restarints, obstacles and solutions. In reality much of their plans are

often based on assumptions, drawn from statistics, literature and not checked in reality with the

stakeholders through focus groups and other marketing techniques. In cases experts talk to

stakeholders, they often are asking ‘leading questions’ or only getting ‘political correct’answers.

Getting support for a protected area is often or in most cases a very long process. Managers often

do not invest enough time and money in this process and assume that after they take the decisons

good PR can do the job: it cannot.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide33

Motivation of the local population by means of participation, consultation and self-determination

Motivation – participation

Participation in itself is not a means to get people motivated. Local stakeholders first have to be

motivated to participate. Without trust there is no way they would even listen or read the information.

To establish trust, informal communication is needed: kitchen meetings, visits to properties, listening

to daily concerns, the conditions of life, and doing something about it. Delivering on promises is the

key to establishing trust – action speaks louder than words. That takes time.

Once trust and understanding has been established, communication is possible: people may want to

absorb information. To motivate them to participate in a joint planning process, much more is needed.

To get this motivation it can be usefull to organize trips to other protected areas, where they can see

how local people benefit from new opportunities, can ask what their experiences were, what did

work and what did not work.

Then they may be ready to discuss participation and the rules of the game towards decision making.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide34

Specific instruments (e.g. empowerment strategies, workshop and education strategies, communicationdesign, virtual communication backbone, event management)

Participation – instruments

There are specific instruments needed to realize meaningful participation. For joint fact fnding

people may have to be trained in specific research methods. On the other hand experts may have to be trained in making optimal use of local knowledge.

For planning people may have to first go into training courses on planning processes. To get a wider support from the community, stakeholders should be involved in communication design

and in the design and production of communication media (video, brochures etc.).

Fun is an important driver for participation, so during the process there should be room to celibrate success. This can be in events such as a fair, or an exhibition, meals or parties.

Virtual communication with local stakeholders may work in special cases, but not often. When this is used for joint planning, proper attention should be paid to train stakeholders in the

relevant e-techniques.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide35

Participation modalities

  • Mostly there exist legal or other obligations that affect the rules of engagement and the degree
  • of public participation. Always make clear in advance how far you want to go with participation. Based on how you see the stakeholders, they can have role as:
  • client
  • partner in dialogue
  • producer of ideas
  • co-producer of the management plan
  • agenda-setter
  • jointly responsible (joint management)
  • the one who decides.
  • Plan your communication interventions accordingly. But be aware that lesser forms of participation will produce less support for a protected are.

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide36

Conclusions

  • Promotion of the idea
  • Focus groups with opinion leaders
  • Building trust – proving you listen and follow up and help (where possible for you) with their concerns – take enough time
  • Motivating to take the idea serious – excursions, peer exchange
  • Information – avoid jargon
  • Ways to participate
  • Decide inadvance role of stakeholders
  • Joint fact finding
  • Joint planning
  • Joint communication
  • Joint celebration of success

Course No. 22, Communication and participation

slide37

3.

The case of Peca Topla

Local consultants and resource persons:

Miro Kline and Branka Hlad

communication public participation in peca topla 1

Communication & Public Participation in Peca Topla (1)

Reviving a paper park through a new Decree

(Slovenia 2000-2001)

slide39
Peca Topla: situation analysis

Protected Landscape Park in small mountain valley established by decree four decades ago without consultation of the few families living in the valley

Inhabitants valley, municipalities close by and other stakeholders do not want the park, do not wish to cooperate, perceive the Regional Conservation Institute – responsible for the park - more and more as their enemy

PLA has no regular contact with inhabitants

slide40
Previous approach

Surveys and studies by Regional Institute

Formal meetings with local authorities

Contacts with local tourist industry

Plan to make a new decree, this time in dialogue with stakeholders

Regional Institute assumes that they know the ideas, attitudes and wishes of stakeholders

slide41
Demand from communication support

How can communication help to convince audiences that a new decree for the landscape park Peca Topla should be formulated in dialogue with stakeholders

How can communication help planning and formulating the new decree for Peca Topla in dialogue with stakeholders

slide42
New approach

Identifying and bringing opinion leaders together

Establishing relationships (visits, meetings)

Assessing perceptions, fears, motives and other emotions (focus groups)

Checking assumptions and preconditions for joint action (focus groups)

Joint planning meetings in valley

Joint execution of plan

Technical interventions (sign boards, leaflet, postcards)

Evaluation and report recommending next steps

slide43
Results

Paper park not revived, Institute understands that that is not what stakeholders need: revival can be realized through people

Attitude change stakeholders: from fear and contempt to trust of individual representatives Institute (they ‘delivered on what they promised’)

Change in behavior stakeholders: cooperation in design and content sign boards and promotion material for valley

Demand for more(direct and indirect) support to improve life in the valley (infrastructure, income generating opportunities)

New idea of the Institute now is to work out a joint management plan for Peca Topla within existing legal framework

slide44
Succesfactors

Listening to customers

Focus groups with external moderator

Delivery on promise

Team work

Motivated local opinion leader

PLA staffs themselves were able to change their preconceived ideas, attitudes and behavior

slide45
Room for improving success

More intensive and extensive communication

Better analysis focus groups

More flexibility in changing own prejudices, assumptions and normal practices

Improve feedback of customer experience to policy level and discuss policy implications

Discuss ideas for next steps with policy level

slide46
Key strategic communication interventions

Identification opinion leaders (informal visits)

Exploration stakeholders ideas and attitudes regarding feasibility proposed interventions (focus groups)

Joint planning and execution (visits)

slide47
Lessons learned

Nature conservation is change management; people are the primary ‘customers’ of nature conservation

Check assumptions by listening to people

Communication is not a substitute for policy; not a ‘magic pill’ to solve any conservation problem

Step by step changes can be realized by strategic communication interventions in social environment combined with other measures or technical interventions

Good communication improves the reputation of nature conservation and builds (further or increased) support for conservation

communication public participation in peca topla 2

Communication & Public Participation in Peca Topla (2)

Planning of a N2K site in area where biodiversity is under threat

(Slovenia 2002-2003)

slide50
Peca Topla Landscape Park

Protected Landscape Park in small mountain valley established by decree four decades ago without consultation of the few families living in the valley

Limited infrastructure in valley and need for additional income generation

Inhabitants valley, municipalities close by and other stakeholders are – based on experiences in the two previous years - willing to cooperate

Area will is recently designated to be a N2K site

slide51
Previous approach

Kitchen meetings to establish working relations

Focus groups to identify emotions, ideas, needs, concerns

Positive response to priority ideas inhabitants for improving life in their valley: Institute helps with sign boards, tourist promotion materials, communication with municipality

Now Institute for Conservation assumes they can negotiate a win win situation (Nota Bene: no joint tact finding, no preparations for negotiation, no idea what walk away point is)

slide52
Demand from communication support

How can communication help to convince audiences that a joint management plan for the landscape park Peca Topla should be formulated in dialogue with stakeholders

How can communication help planning and formulating the management plan for Peca Topla in dialogue with stakeholders

How can we gain support for N2K

slide53
New approach

Focus groups to explore ideas and motives for exploring new income generating activities in valley as part of the steps towards a joint management plan

Joint planning and execution of next steps

Excursion to successful income generation projects in other parks in Slovenia

Bureaucratic support interventions (demarche PLA to municipality to improve roads, demarche to Caving society to open old mine as tourist attraction)

Communication interventions (timely, tailored and targeted information on opening ceremony)

Evaluation and report recommending next steps

slide54
Results

Win win situation not realized, no joint management plan yet: is ‘a bridge too far’

Good communication, but with wrong product: improved reputation of Institute for Conservation, not yet of nature conservation itself – good basis to start communicating N2K

Attitude change stakeholders: pride on valley; not yet behavior change towards nature

Cooperation of all inhabitants of valley in interventions that may improve their life

Demand and need for continued strategic support to improve infrastructure and income generation

slide56
Succesfactors

Listening to customers

Focus group identifying new income generating opportunities

Existing interest in other income generating projects

Meetings in the local Inn in the valley

Informal communication

Team work

Free publicity of opening mine (positive feedback)

slide58
Room for improving success

Existing legislation and policies limit possibilities of joint management

Approach chosen = a bridge too far: it is too early to negotiate win win situations: they have still to be identified

More investment in teamwork and project management skills

Insufficient reporting of ‘market experiences’ to bosses and insufficient involvement of ‘bosses’

No feedback to customers on successes

slide59
Key strategic communication interventions

Identification opinion leaders (informal visits)

Exploration stakeholders ideas and attitudes regarding feasibility proposed interventions (focus groups)

Joint planning and execution (visits)

slide60
Lessons learned

Nature conservation is change management; people are the primary ‘customers’ of nature conservation

Check assumptions by listening to people

Communication is not a substitute for policy; not a ‘magic pill’ to solve any conservation problem

Step by step changes can be realized by strategic communication interventions in social environment combined with other measures or technical interventions

Good communication improves the reputation of nature conservation and builds (further or increased) support for conservation

slide62

Nature conservation is managing change

Managing change also means changing your own attitude & practices

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