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Let’s Try It. Practice. “Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

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2. What is the conflict in this story?

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2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

“Thank you, sir, but I can’t,” replied Little Red Riding Hood. “As you can see, I’m carrying this basket of ginger cookies to my grandmother, and I can’t be late.”

“Tell you what, Red. You just hop on the back, and I’ll run you over to Granny’s in five seconds flat.”

“My grandmother lives way out at the end of Lonely Road,” Red protested. “It’s miles and miles.”

“This here motorcycle eats miles.”

“No, thank you,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I’ve made up my mind.”

1. What does each character want?

2. What is the conflict in this story?

3. Is it an internal or external conflict?


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

“Thank you, sir, but I can’t,” replied Little Red Riding Hood. “As you can see, I’m carrying this basket of ginger cookies to my grandmother, and I can’t be late.”

“Tell you what, Red. You just hop on the back, and I’ll run you over to Granny’s in five seconds flat.”

“My grandmother lives way out at the end of Lonely Road,” Red protested. “It’s miles and miles.”

“This here motorcycle eats miles.”

“No, thank you,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I’ve made up my mind.”

1. What does each character want?

Red wants to walk to her grandmother’s house with cookies.

The wolf wants to kidnap Red.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

“Thank you, sir, but I can’t,” replied Little Red Riding Hood. “As you can see, I’m carrying this basket of ginger cookies to my grandmother, and I can’t be late.”

“Tell you what, Red. You just hop on the back, and I’ll run you over to Granny’s in five seconds flat.”

“My grandmother lives way out at the end of Lonely Road,” Red protested. “It’s miles and miles.”

“This here motorcycle eats miles.”

“No, thank you,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I’ve made up my mind.”

2. What is the conflict in this story?

There is a conflict between Red’s need to arrive safely at her grandmother’s house and the wolf’s desire to eat Red.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

“Thank you, sir, but I can’t,” replied Little Red Riding Hood. “As you can see, I’m carrying this basket of ginger cookies to my grandmother, and I can’t be late.”

“Tell you what, Red. You just hop on the back, and I’ll run you over to Granny’s in five seconds flat.”

“My grandmother lives way out at the end of Lonely Road,” Red protested. “It’s miles and miles.”

“This here motorcycle eats miles.”

“No, thank you,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I’ve made up my mind.”

3. Is it an internal or external conflict?

The conflict is external. It occurs between two characters, not within a character’s mind.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

“Thank you, sir, but I can’t,” replied Little Red Riding Hood. “As you can see, I’m carrying this basket of ginger cookies to my grandmother, and I can’t be late.”

“Tell you what, Red. You just hop on the back, and I’ll run you over to Granny’s in five seconds flat.”

“My grandmother lives way out at the end of Lonely Road,” Red protested. “It’s miles and miles.”

“This here motorcycle eats miles.”

“No, thank you,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I’ve made up my mind.”

4. Find an example of foreshadowing in this part of the story.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Hi there, Red,” said a wolf to a little girl in a red velvet hood. “How’d ya like a ride on my motorcycle?”

“Thank you, sir, but I can’t,” replied Little Red Riding Hood. “As you can see, I’m carrying this basket of ginger cookies to my grandmother, and I can’t be late.”

“Tell you what, Red. You just hop on the back, and I’ll run you over to Granny’s in five seconds flat.”

“My grandmother lives way out at the end of Lonely Road,” Red protested. “It’s miles and miles.”

“This here motorcycle eats miles.”

“No, thank you,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I’ve made up my mind.”

4. Find an example of foreshadowing in this part of the story.

Granny lives on “Lonely Road.” There may not be neighbors to help protect Red.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Suit yourself,” chuckled the wolf, who had thought of a wicked plan. He would go alone to the end of Lonely Road, gobble up Red’s grandma, and then, when the little girl turned up, he would gobble her up too.

So, arriving at the last house on Lonely Road, the wolf raced his engine, scaring Grandma out her back door and under the woodshed. The wolf was puzzled to find the house empty, but he put on Grandma’s nightcap and nightshirt and climbed into the bed to wait for Red.

It was nearly dark when Red arrived, but as she approached her grandma’s bed, she sensed something was wrong.

5. What complications have occurred in the story so far? (What events have prevented the wolf from eating Little Red Riding Hood?)


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Suit yourself,” chuckled the wolf, who had thought of a wicked plan. He would go alone to the end of Lonely Road, gobble up Red’s grandma, and then, when the little girl turned up, he would gobble her up too.

So, arriving at the last house on Lonely Road, the wolf raced his engine, scaring Grandma out her back door and under the woodshed. The wolf was puzzled to find the house empty, but he put on Grandma’s nightcap and nightshirt and climbed into the bed to wait for Red.

It was nearly dark when Red arrived, but as she approached her grandma’s bed, she sensed something was wrong.

5. What complications have occurred in the story so far?

Red has refused to ride the wolf’s motorcycle. The wolf has made a plan to trick Red at her grandmother’s house.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Suit yourself,” chuckled the wolf, who had thought of a wicked plan. He would go alone to the end of Lonely Road, gobble up Red’s grandma, and then, when the little girl turned up, he would gobble her up too.

So, arriving at the last house on Lonely Road, the wolf raced his engine, scaring Grandma out her back door and under the woodshed. The wolf was puzzled to find the house empty, but he put on Grandma’s nightcap and nightshirt and climbed into the bed to wait for Red.

It was nearly dark when Red arrived, but as she approached her grandma’s bed, she sensed something was wrong.

6. The boldface words are examples of ____________.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Suit yourself,” chuckled the wolf, who had thought of a wicked plan. He would go alone to the end of Lonely Road, gobble up Red’s grandma, and then, when the little girl turned up, he would gobble her up too.

So, arriving at the last house on Lonely Road, the wolf raced his engine, scaring Grandma out her back door and under the woodshed. The wolf was puzzled to find the house empty, but he put on Grandma’s nightcap and nightshirt and climbed into the bed to wait for Red.

It was nearly dark when Red arrived, but as she approached her grandma’s bed, she sensed something was wrong.

6. The boldface words are examples of foreshadowing.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“Are you all right, Granny?” Red asked. “Your eyes look bloodshot.”

“All the better to see you with,” replied the wolf.

“And your teeth—suddenly they look like fangs.”

“All the better to eat—” the wolf began, but he stopped at the sound of his motorcycle engine thundering in the front yard. “Wait right there, Red,” said the wolf, bounding from the bed.

7. What part of the plot is about to happen?


2 what is the conflict in this story

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Practice

“Are you all right, Granny?” Red asked. “Your eyes look bloodshot.”

“All the better to see you with,” replied the wolf.

“And your teeth—suddenly they look like fangs.”

“All the better to eat—” the wolf began, but he stopped at the sound of his motorcycle engine thundering in the front yard. “Wait right there, Red,” said the wolf, bounding from the bed.

7. What part of the plot is about to happen?

The climax is about happen. Something will stop the wolf from eating Red.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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Practice

“All the better to eat—” the wolf began, but he stopped at the sound of his motorcycle engine thundering in the front yard. “Wait right there, Red,” said the wolf, bounding from the bed.

The wolf was startled to find Grandma sitting on the motorcycle.

“Hey!” he shouted. “Stop fooling with my bike.” As he lunged for her, Grandma found the gearshift, and the cycle leapt forward, scooping the wolf up on its handlebars and hurling him into a giant thorn bush—

8. What words and phrases make this part of the story exciting?


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“All the better to eat—” the wolf began, but he stopped at the sound of his motorcycle engine thundering in the front yard. “Wait right there, Red,” said the wolf, bounding from the bed.

The wolf was startled to find Grandma sitting on the motorcycle.

“Hey!” he shouted. “Stop fooling with my bike.” As he lunged for her, Grandma found the gearshift, and the cycle leapt forward, scooping the wolf up on its handlebars and hurling him into a giant thorn bush—

8. What words and phrases make this part of the story exciting?

The boldface words make this part of the story exciting.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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9. What is the story’s resolution?

“Hey!” he shouted. “Stop fooling with my bike.” As he lunged for her, Grandma found the gearshift, and the cycle leapt forward, scooping the wolf up on its handlebars and hurling him into a giant thorn bush—which is where the police found him when they arrived.

The wolf was brought to trial and sent to prison. Granny became a popular guest on talk shows. Red lived happily ever after.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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9. What is the story’s resolution?

“Hey!” he shouted. “Stop fooling with my bike.” As he lunged for her, Grandma found the gearshift, and the cycle leapt forward, scooping the wolf up on its handlebars and hurling him into a giant thorn bush—which is where the police found him when they arrived.

The wolf was brought to trial and sent to prison. Granny became a popular guest on talk shows. Red lived happily ever after.

The wolf went to jail, Granny became famous, and Red lived happily ever after.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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“How happy they look!” thought Swetha, as she watched her classmates fill the cafeteria. Being the new kid at Blane Middle School wasn’t easy. Sure, some of the girls had talked to her, but no one had been especially friendly.

As the girls and boys filed by—some smiling, some not—Swetha picked at her lunch and thought about all the good friends she had left behind.

“Hey, what’s your name?” A tray plopped down beside hers, and a very tall boy folded himself into the seat beside her.

1. Whose thoughts and feelings are revealed?

2. Is the narrator a character in the story?

3. What is the point of view?


2 what is the conflict in this story

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Practice

“How happy they look!” thought Swetha, as she watched her classmates fill the cafeteria. Being the new kid at Blane Middle School wasn’t easy. Sure, some of the girls had talked to her, but no one had been especially friendly.

As the girls and boys filed by—some smiling, some not—Swetha picked at her lunch and thought about all the good friends she had left behind.

“Hey, what’s your name?” A tray plopped down beside hers, and a very tall boy folded himself into the seat beside her.

1. Whose thoughts and feelings are revealed?

I know only Swetha’s thoughts and feelings.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“How happy they look!” thought Swetha, as she watched her classmates fill the cafeteria. Being the new kid at Blane Middle School wasn’t easy. Sure, some of the girls had talked to her, but no one had been especially friendly.

As the girls and boys filed by—some smiling, some not—Swetha picked at her lunch and thought about all the good friends she had left behind.

“Hey, what’s your name?” A tray plopped down beside hers, and a very tall boy folded himself into the seat beside her.

2. Is the narrator a character in the story?

No, the narrator is not a character in the story using “I.” The story is being told through Swetha’s eyes.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Let’s Try It

Practice

“How happy they look!” thought Swetha, as she watched her classmates fill the cafeteria. Being the new kid at Blane Middle School wasn’t easy. Sure, some of the girls had talked to her, but no one had been especially friendly.

As the girls and boys filed by—some smiling, some not—Swetha picked at her lunch and thought about all the good friends she had left behind.

“Hey, what’s your name?” A tray plopped down beside hers, and a very tall boy folded himself into the seat beside her.

3. What is the point of view?

The point of view is third-person-limited.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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Practice

1.There was Slade and here was Mr. Baumer with his bills and here I was, just as before, just like in the second go-round of a bad dream. I felt like turning back, being embarrassed and half scared by trouble even when it wasn’t mine. Please, I said to myself, don’t stop, Mr. Baumer! “Bargain”

1. From which point of view is this story told? Explain your answer.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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1.There was Slade and here was Mr. Baumer with his bills and here I was, just as before, just like in the second go-round of a bad dream. I felt like turning back, being embarrassed and half scared by trouble even when it wasn’t mine. Please, I said to myself, don’t stop, Mr. Baumer! “Bargain”

1. From which point of view is this story told? Explain your answer.

The story is told from the first-person point of view. The narrator uses “I” and is a character in the story.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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2. In town, on the shadowy step of the grocery store, the men sat with their hands on their knees, conversing with great leisure and ease.

Mr. Bittering wanted to fire a pistol in the air.

What are you doing, you fools! he thought. Sitting here! You’ve heard the news—we’re stranded on this planet. Well, move! Aren’t you frightened? Aren’t you afraid? What are you going to do?

“Hello, Harry,” said everyone.

“The Naming of Names”

2. From which point of view is this story told? Explain your answer.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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2. In town, on the shadowy step of the grocery store, the men sat with their hands on their knees, conversing with great leisure and ease.

Mr. Bittering wanted to fire a pistol in the air.

What are you doing, you fools! he thought. Sitting here! You’ve heard the news—we’re stranded on this planet. Well, move! Aren’t you frightened? Aren’t you afraid? What are you going to do?

“Hello, Harry,” said everyone.

“The Naming of Names”

2. From which point of view is this story told? Explain your answer.

Third-person-limited. We know only the thoughts of Bittering. The narrator is not a character in the story.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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3.At the spring festival young men and young women from the village hoped to meet and to choose whom they would marry. How Yeh-Shen longed to go! But her stepmother had other plans. She hoped to find a husband for her own daughter and did not want any man to see the beauteous Yeh-Shen first.

“Yeh-Shen”

3. From which point of view is this story told? Explain your answer.


2 what is the conflict in this story

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3.At the spring festival young men and young women from the village hoped to meet and to choose whom they would marry. How Yeh-Shen longed to go! But her stepmother had other plans. She hoped to find a husband for her own daughter and did not want any man to see the beauteous Yeh-Shen first.

“Yeh-Shen”

3. From which point of view is this story told? Explain your answer.

Omniscient point of view. The narrator is outside the story yet knows everyone’s thoughts and feelings.


2 what is the conflict in this story

Review - MOOD

Describe the MOOD of the following short stories:

“Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”

“Three Skeleton Key”

“Duffy’s Jacket”

“After Twenty Years”

“A Rice Sandwich”

“Mason-Dixon Memory”

“A Day’s Wait”

“Stolen Day”


2 what is the conflict in this story

My name is Andrea. Lately I have been working in a veterinary clinic with one of my best friends from high school. From the very beginning we both knew we wanted to work with animals. I guess we just didn’t realize that it would take us so long to own our own clinic. Eight years of college is a long time, especially when you have a young girl at home to take care of. I suppose if I wasn’t married, everything would be even harder though. At least I am lucky enough to work at a place where I am happy. It feels good to be able to help save an animal’s life. It was only an hour ago that a lady walked in with a bloody cat. She told me that it had been hit by a car. I have worked with many injured cats before, and I knew exactly what to do.

I remember my seventh grade year of junior high was very enlightening for me. I knew that ever since I was young, that when I got into junior high and high school, I wanted to take classes so I could be a vet. Back then I didn’t know that these classes would be different than classes I had ever taken before. We were preparing the frogs. I was a little afraid of what I might see. What if I didn’t know what to do? What if I got a bad grade? Would I have to change my career now? I was worried about a lot of things. I guess I was just worried that I was going to find out I couldn’t do what I had been dreaming of for many years.

Right after P.E. at around 10:00 A.M., I walked into science class. Jessica Smith was my assigned lab partner. We had been friends for a long time, ever since she moved into town. We both wanted to be vets, and we were great students. Our science teacher knew that even though we were girls, we would be great at dissection. After this A+ I would no longer have to worry about whether or not I would be able to cut open an animal to look down at its insides and wonder what to do next.

We sat down at the table, the teacher brought out the frogs, and then she passed them around. The room had an awful aroma all around, and at first everyone complained about it. After everyone was settled in, we pinned down our frog. Jessica and I decided to split the tasks on what to find and help each other if needed. I let her start by taking the scalpel and cutting the poor amphibian straight down its belly.


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