Reaction engineering chemical vapor deposition cvd l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Reaction Engineering: Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 805 Views
  • Updated On :
  • Presentation posted in: General

Reaction Engineering: Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD. Quak Foo Lee Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering The University of British Columbia 2003. What is CVD?. Thin film formation from vapor phase reactants. Deposited films range from metals to semiconductors to insulators.

Download Presentation

Reaction Engineering: Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Reaction engineering chemical vapor deposition cvd l.jpg

Reaction Engineering:Chemical Vapor DepositionCVD

Quak Foo Lee

Department of Chemical and Biological EngineeringThe University of British Columbia

2003


What is cvd l.jpg

What is CVD?

  • Thin film formation from vapor phase reactants. Deposited films range from metals to semiconductors to insulators.

  • An essential process step in the manufacturing of microelectronic devices. High temperatures and low pressures are the most common process conditions, but are not necessary.

  • All CVD involves using an energy source to break reactant gases into reactive species for deposition.


Applications of cvd l.jpg

Applications of CVD

  • Thin films for electronic and optical devices

  • Protective and decorative coatings

  • Particle production

  • Microelectronic chips

  • Optoelectronics

  • Silicon technology (the largest application)  semiconductor


Deposition sequences l.jpg

Deposition Sequences

  • Mass transport in the bulk gas flow region from the reactor inlet to the deposition zone

  • Gas phase reactions leading to the formation of film precursors and byproducts

  • Mass transport of film precursors to the growth surface

  • Adsorption of film precursors to the growth surface


Deposition sequences cont l.jpg

Deposition Sequences (cont…)

  • Surface diffusion of film precursors to growth sites

  • Incorporation of film constituents into the growing film

  • Desorption of byproducts of the surface reactions

  • Mass transport of byproducts in the bulk gas flow region away from the deposition zone towards the reactor exit


Transport and reaction processes underlying cvd l.jpg

Transport and Reaction Processes underlying CVD

Main Gas Flow Regime

Gas Phase Reactions

Desorption of Volatile Surface Reaction Products

Redesorption of Film Precursor

Transport to Surface

Surface Diffusion

Nucleation and Island Growth

Step Growth

Adsorption of Film Precursor


Rule i l.jpg

Rule I

CVD reactors must be designed and operated in such a manner that film thickness, crystal structure, surface morphology, and interface composition

changes can be accurately controlled.


Typical cvd reactors l.jpg

Typical CVD Reactors

  • Horizontal reactor

  • Vertical reactor

  • Barrel reactor

  • Pancake reactor

  • Multiple-wafer-in-tube LPCVD reactor


Thermal diffusion l.jpg

Thermal Diffusion


Examples of cvd l.jpg

Examples of CVD

  • Metals/Conductors – W, Al, Cu, doped poly-Si

  • Insulators (dielectries) – BPSG, Si3N4, SiO2

  • Semiconductors – Si, Ge, InP, GaAsP

  • Silicides – TiSi2, WSi2

  • Barriers – TiN, TaN


Types of cvd processes l.jpg

Types of CVD Processes

  • Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD)

  • Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD)

  • Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD)

  • Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PAVCD) or plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD)

  • Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD)

  • Photochemical Vapor Deposition (PCVD)

  • Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI)

  • Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE)


Advantages of cvd l.jpg

Advantages of CVD

  • Versatile – can deposit any element or compound

  • High Purity – typically 99.99 to 99.999%

  • High Density – nearly 100% of theoretical

  • Material Formation well below the melting point

  • Coatings Deposited by CVD are conformal and near net shape

  • Economical in production, since many parts can be coated at the same time


  • Login