Improving transitions from adult basic education to postsecondary education and training
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Improving Transitions from Adult Basic Education to Postsecondary Education and Training. Ed Strong Corporation for a Skilled Workforce Presentation to Maryland’s Sector Academy. General Overview of Adult Learning. Introduction State Strategies to Improve Transitions Conclusion/Questions.

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Improving transitions from adult basic education to postsecondary education and training

Improving Transitions from Adult Basic Education to Postsecondary Education and Training

Ed Strong

Corporation for a Skilled Workforce

Presentation to Maryland’s Sector Academy


General overview of adult learning
General Overview of Adult Learning Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Introduction

  • State Strategies to Improve Transitions

  • Conclusion/Questions


Introduction
Introduction Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Each year more than 1.2 million people drop out of high school (NCAL, 2008)

  • 20% of American adults have low prose literacy (ETS, 2007)

  • 46% of adults have no college experience and 65.6% lack a college degree (U.S. Census, 2007)

  • More than 24 million adults speak English “less than very well” (U.S. Census, 2007)

  • The knowledge economy increasingly requires postsecondary education and training (ETS, 2007)

  • In 2004, males with a BA earned 96% more than those with just a HSD


What are states doing
What are States Doing? Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Align Adult Basic Education and Postsecondary Policies

  • Connect Basic Skills Curriculums with Relevant Skills

  • Partner for Comprehensive Service Delivery

  • Link Learning with Opportunities for Employment

  • Increase Adult Basic Education Program Flexibility and Access

  • Collect Data Based on Transitions and Employment


Align adult basic education and postsecondary policies
Align Adult Basic Education and Postsecondary Policies Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Promote Dual Enrollment strategies between basic skills and postsecondary education and training programs

  • Build Career Pathways between basic skills courses and postsecondary programs

  • Develop clear ArticulationAgreements between basic skills and postsecondary education programs

  • Cross-walk assessments and entry/exit standards across programs

  • Example: Ohio Career-Technical Credit Transfer Initiative (CT2)


Connect basic skills curriculums with relevant skills
Connect Basic Skills Curriculums with Relevant Skills Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Contextualize basic skills courses to in-demand sectors

  • Integrate basic skills curriculums with soft-skills development

  • Make postsecondary education and work readiness the goal of basic skills curriculums

  • Foster entrepreneurial thinking through basic skills development

  • Example: I-BEST in Washington State


Partner for comprehensive service delivery
Partner for Comprehensive Service Delivery Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Support student success by partnering with wrap-around service providers, increasing student access to child care, transportation and other services

  • Partner to increase program capacity and service delivery

  • Share information across agencies and programs

  • Develop regional adult learning strategies

  • Work with employers to ensure that learners are gaining skills needed in the workplace

  • Example: Michigan’s Adult Learning Transformation


Link learning with opportunities for employment
Link Learning with Opportunities for Employment Postsecondary Education and Training

  • Partner with employers to ensure that there are employment opportunities available to students

  • Provide academic and career counseling to guide learners along the pathway to their goals

  • Ensure that programs lead to industry-recognized credentials

  • Example: California Extended Opportunity Program and Services (EOPS)


Increase adult basic education program flexibility and access
Increase Adult Basic Education Program Flexibility and Access

  • Offer programs during non-traditional and traditional hours

  • Utilize open entry/open exit programming to allow learners to enter and exit programs easily

  • Allow students to enroll in distance learning programs

  • Address participants’ barriers to participation through intensive wrap-around services

  • Make adult basic education affordable to low-income adult learners

  • Example: Project IDEAL


Collect data based on transitions and employment
Collect Data Based on Transitions and Employment Access

  • Ensure that transitions and employment are the goals of adult basic education

  • Establish shared and linked data procedures across adult basic education and postsecondary education programs

  • Utilize measures that focus on transitions to postsecondary education, employment, wage increases and improvements in basic skills

  • Longitudinally track participants through adult basic education, postsecondary education and training and into employment

  • Example: Florida Data Warehouse


Questions
Questions? Access


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