A charge to collaborate
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A Charge to Collaborate:. IT ’ S NOT JUST ABOUT WHAT WE DO… IT ’ S ABOUT HOW WE DO IT…. How we will get there. Participants, Roles, Structure, Goals and Values of the Learning Collaborative. Learning Collaborative Goals.

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A charge to collaborate

A Charge to Collaborate:

IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT WHAT WE DO… IT’S ABOUT HOW WE DO IT…


How we will get there

How we will get there. . .

Participants, Roles, Structure, Goals and Values of the Learning Collaborative


Learning collaborative goals

Learning Collaborative Goals

  • Create an environment for shared learning within and amongst county child welfare and mental health agencies and their key partners.

  • Facilitate peer-to-peer learning

  • Identify shared needs and solutions to meet those needs

  • Connect counties to experts in other counties and in the field.


Learning collaborative goals cont

Learning Collaborative Goals (Cont.)

  • Provide Implementation Teams with work time to establish and refine work plans with goals, actions, and a timeline

  • Provide new knowledge and skills related to collaboration and the CPM that empower local county implementation to do the work

  • Identify training needs for line staff, supervisors and community partners


Learning collaborative structure and sequencing

Learning Collaborative: Structure and Sequencing

  • A 3-tiered structure is designed to facilitate implementation at the local, regional and statewide level;

    • Tier 1: Statewide Leadership Team

    • Tier 2: Regional Learning Sessions

    • Tier 3: Local Implementation Teams


A charge to collaborate

Tier 1: Statewide Leadership Team: US!State & County Leaders in Child Welfare & Mental Health;State-level Stakeholders; Training Partners; Subject Experts

ROLE:

  • Articulate state-level priorities for the LC

  • Guide the planning of the LC process

  • Share regional perspectives with the state

  • Identify common barriers to implementation around the state, in order to generate solutions


Tier 1 statewide leadership team objectives

Tier 1: Statewide Leadership TeamObjectives

  • Identify needed resources and supports for training and implementation across the state

  • Identify training and implementation tools to assist with statewide implementation

  • Establish a communication plan that coordinates statewide and county-level training implementation

  • Establish a plan for data collection


Tier 2 regional learning sessions

Tier 2: Regional Learning Sessions

  • Regional events and activities facilitated by the Regional Training Academies, with assistance by content experts, CDSS and DHCS representatives, and key stakeholders

  • Role:

    • Guide local implementation teams

    • Identify barriers to implementation and possible solutions

    • Share regional resources, tools and ideas

    • Identify areas that may benefit from statewide training or technical assistance, and communicate them to the Statewide Leadership Team.


Tier 3 local county implementation teams

Tier 3: Local County Implementation Teams

  • Cross-agency, cross-system teams with multi-level county staff, tribes, parent/youth reps and other stakeholders identified by the county

  • Role:

    • Guide county implementation of new practice philosophy and services.

    • Identify county-level barriers to implementation and potential solutions.

    • Determine county-specific training and technical assistance needs.

    • Identify areas of inquiry for the Regional Learning Sessions.


Sequencing of the lc process

Sequencing of the LC process

  • 1st Statewide Leadership Team Oct 28th, 2013

  • Regional Learning sessions occur Dec 2013 – February 2014

  • Regional Learning sessions occur March 2014 – June 2014

  • 2nd Statewide Leadership Team July, 2014

  • Regional Learning sessions occur Oct 2014 – Feb 2015

  • 3rd Statewide Leadership Team between Feb – April 2015


The learning collaborative

The Learning Collaborative

Participants and Roles


Bay area counties

BAY AREA COUNTIES


Initial county cohort by region welcome teams

Initial county cohort by region – WELCOME teams!


Roles initial cohort counties

Roles: Initial Cohort Counties

  • Form a Leadership Team to guide statewide implementation and participate in the Statewide Leadership Team

  • Participate in Regional Learning Sessions to guide regional implementation

  • Form a county-level Implementation Team to guide local implementation and to direct and monitor training and implementation efforts


Top five priorities

TOP FIVE PRIORITIES

  • System Integration (paradigm shift, culture of shared responsibility, interagency communication, Integration of initiatives and data collection)

  • Sustaining Family and Youth engagement

  • Out of County Placements (challenges: assessment, service delivery, service integration, transitions)

  • Trauma Informed Systems

  •   Reflective Practice

  •   Coaching and Supervision model/strategy

  • Resources(staff, fiscal, services, non-traditional services, dosage)


Table introductions expectations for the learning collaborative

Table introductions & expectations for the Learning Collaborative

  • Why did your county decide to participate in this Learning Collaborative?

  • What do you hope to get out of the Learning Collaborative process?

  • What do you hope to learn and accomplish today?


A charge to collaborate

  • AGENDA REVIEW

  • COUNTY SHARING

  • THE WORK BEGINS


Thank you so much for participating

Thank you so much for participating!


Shared successes

SHARED SUCCESSES


Systems and interagency collaboration

SYSTEMS AND INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION

  • AGENCIES HAVE CO-LOCATED SPACE AND STAFF

  • PROCESSES IN PLACE TO SHARE AND RECEIVE FEEDBACK TO SOLVE AND ENHANCE SUCCESS


Systems capacity

SYSTEMS CAPACITY

  • PROCESS IN PLACE TO SUPPORT EFFECTIVE REFERRAL PROCESS AND ACCESS TO SERVICES

  • AGENCIES UTILIZE PARTNERSHIPS WITH OTHER AGENCIES TO INSURE FAMILIES HAVE ACCESS TO AN ARRAY OF SERVICES

  • AGENCIES ENGAGE LOCAL COMMUNITY THROUGH ACTIVITIES, PUBLIC MEETINGS, FORUMS, ETC


Service array

SERVICE ARRAY

  • TAILORED SERVICES

  • COMMUNITY BASED

  • EVIDENCED BASED


Involvement of children youth and families

INVOLVEMENT OF CHILDREN YOUTH AND FAMILIES

  • AREA OF VERY FEW SHARED STENGTHS

  • ONE SHARED AREA WAS PEER NETWORKS


Cultural responsiveness

CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS

  • CULTURAL IDENTITY VALUED

  • DIVERSITY AND LANGUAGE OF STAFF REFLECT COMMUNITY

  • TRAINING – YAY

  • MATERIALS PUBLISHED AND TRANSLATED INTO LANGUAGES FOUND IN COMMUNITY

  • SERVICES PROVIDED IN OWN LANGUAGE

  • SERVICE PLANS IN OWN LANGUAGE

  • PARTNER WITH CULTURALLY BASED COMMUNITY GROUPS


Outcomes and evaluation

OUTCOMES AND EVALUATION

  • EVALUATION PLANS DEFINE SPECIFIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES THAT ARE MEASURABLE

  • EVALUATION PLANS DESCRIBE HOW DATA INFORMS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

  • BASICALLY 3 OUT OF 4 COUNTIES FEEL THEY HAVE GOOD DATA


Fiscal resources

FISCAL RESOURCES

  • UNDERSTAND FUNDING NEEDS

  • FISCAL AGREEMENTS AND COMMITTMENT OF FUNDING

  • TRACK EXPENSES

  • MULTIPLE FUNDING STREAMS


Shared concerns

SHARED CONCERNS


Agency leadership

AGENCY LEADERSHIP

  • SHARED RESPONSIBILITY

  • FORUMS FOR SHARING INFORMATION

  • MEANINGFUL ROLE OF FAMILIES AND COMMUNITY PARTNERS


Systems and interagency collaboration1

SYSTEMS AND INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION

  • LACK OF FORMAL AGREEMENTS, MOU, SHARED TRAINING PLANS

  • JOINT OPPORTUNITY FOR TRAINNIG

  • ESTABLISHED PROCESS FOR REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

  • INFORMATION SYSTEMS THAT SUPPORT SHARING OF INFORMATION


Systems capacity1

SYSTEMS CAPACITY

  • TIMELY AND FULL MENTAL HEALTH ASSESSMENTS

  • EFFECTIVE PROCESS FOR RECRUITMENT, HIRING AND TRAINNG PERSONNEL

  • ADEQUATE NETWORK OF MENTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS


Service array1

SERVICE ARRAY

  • SERVICES THAT SUPPORT TRANSITIONS TO COMMUNITY AND ADULT (NMD)

  • SERVICES TO MEET MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS OF COMMUNITY

  • NON TRADITIONAL SERVICES


Involvment of children youth and families

INVOLVMENT OF CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES

  • FAMILY VOICE IN PLANNING, DELIVERY AND EVALUATION OF SERVICES

  • OPPORTUNITES FOR FEEDBACK

  • PEER SUPPORT NETWORKS

  • TRAINING AND WRITTEN INFORMATION AVAILABLE TO FAMILIES AS INFORMED DECISION MAKERS

  • FAMILY INVOLVEMENT IN QUALITY INDICATORS OF SERVICES

  • AREA OF GREATEST CHALLENGE


Cultural responsiveness1

CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS

  • ALL COUNTIES SCORED ALL AREAS AS A 2 OR 3


Outcomes and evaluation1

OUTCOMES AND EVALUATION

  • 3 OUT OF 4 COUNTIES SCORED THIS AS A 2 OR 3


Fiscal resources1

FISCAL RESOURCES

  • STAFF TRAINING IN TIME STUDY (SUPERVISORS GET THIS IN FOUNDATIONS)

  • CROSS SYSTEMS TRAINING OF STRATEGIES AND FUNDING RESOURCES

  • WRITTEN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ON FUNDING AND BLENDED FUNDING. (MIXED BAG – 2 COUNTIES HAD A 1 AND 2 COUNTIES HAD A 3)


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