Guide to evidence for wasc accreditation
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Guide to Evidence for WASC Accreditation. Dr. Robert Gabriner City College of San Francisco Student Learning Outcomes Workshop Strand 3. Intentional and Purposeful Interpretation and Reflection Integrated and Holistic Quantitative and Qualitative Direct or Indirect. Student work samples

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Guide to Evidence for WASC Accreditation

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Guide to evidence for wasc accreditation

Guide to Evidence for WASC Accreditation

Dr. Robert Gabriner

City College of San Francisco

Student Learning Outcomes Workshop Strand 3


Guide to evidence for wasc accreditation

Intentional and Purposeful

Interpretation and Reflection

Integrated and Holistic

Quantitative and Qualitative

Direct or Indirect


Methods that provide direct evidence

Student work samples

Collections of student work (e.g. Portfolios)

Capstone projects

Project-embedded assessment

Observations of student behavior

Internal juried review of student projects

Evaluations of performance

External juried review of student projects

Externally reviewed internship

Performance on a case study/problem

Performance on problem and analysis (Student

explains how he or she solved a problem)

Performance on national licensure examinations

Locally developed tests

Standardized tests

Pre-and post-tests

Essay tests blind scored across units

Methods That Provide Direct Evidence


Methods that provide indirect evidence

Alumni, Employer, Student Surveys

Focus groups

Exit Interviews with Graduates

Graduate Follow-up Studies

Percentage of students who go on to graduate

school

Job Placement Statistics

Faculty/Student ratios

Percentage of students who study abroad

Enrollment trends

Percentage of students who graduate withinfive-six years

Diversity of student body

CAS Standards

Retention and Transfer Studies

Methods That Provide Indirect Evidence


Four principles of evidence

Four Principles of Evidence

  • Knowledge and skills

  • Multiple judgments of student performance

  • Multiple dimensions of student performance

  • More than surveys or self-reports


Negative syndromes

Negative Syndromes

  • Trying to measure everything

  • Avoiding premature closure

  • Trying to be too “precise”


What constitutes good evidence

What Constitutes Good Evidence

  • Relevant

    • Clear rationale for relation to Standard

  • Verifiable

    • Documentable and replicable

  • Representative

    • Typical of situation or condition

  • Cumulative

    • Multiple sources, methods for independent corroboration

  • Actionable

    • Action for improvement


Standard ii b 3 b

Standard II.B.3.b

  • The institution provides an environment that encourages personal and civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all of its students


Project shine measurable student learning outcomes

Project Shine Measurable Student Learning Outcomes

  • Measured by pre/post surveys

    • Students gain greater admiration for and understanding of elders

  • Measured by listening/speaking rubric

    • ESL students improve ability to provide information, answer questions, ask for help in English

  • Measured by exam

    • Political science students learn requirements for naturalization


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