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 Study as work : the role of 'training' in the lives of medical migrants to the UK. Leroi Henry, Parvati Raghuram, Joanna Bornat 48th Congress of the European Regional Science Association 27 – 31 August 2008, Liverpool, UK. Structure. South Asian Geriatricians project

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 Study as work : the role of 'training' in the lives of medical migrants to the UK

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 Study as work: the role of 'training' in the lives of medical migrants to the UK

Leroi Henry, Parvati Raghuram, Joanna Bornat

48th Congress of the European Regional Science Association

27 – 31 August 2008, Liverpool, UK


Structure

  • South Asian Geriatricians project

  • How doctors’ mobility and narratives of career were shaped by Empire

  • The tensions inherent in the integration of study and work for migrants

  • Migrants vulnerability to changes in the regulatory environment


South Asian Geriatricians project

  • Two year ESRC funded project

  • Supported by British Geriatrics Society and British Association of Physicians of Indian Origin

  • 60 oral history interviews with retired and serving geriatricians trained in South Asia

  • 30 Completed

  • 23 Transcribed

  • http://www.open.ac.uk/hsc/research/research-projects/geriatric-medicine/home.php


Interviewees by country of origin


Interviewees by Deanery


Interviewees by age


Postcolonial ties and interests underpinning medical migration

  • Historical reliance of NHS on colonial and commonwealth labor

  • Postcolonial relations embedded in accreditation of qualifications and regulation of medical migration

  • Permits and the integration of work and training


Postcolonial ties, mobility and migrant doctors’ motivations

  • Institutional linkages in transnational socio-cognitive community

  • Narratives of post graduate training in the UK as markers of career success and being a good doctor

  • Temporary mobility for validating and updating skills


The integration of learning and work 1: the process of training in the workplace

  • Membership of the Royal Colleges and specialist training

  • Developing clinical practice and communication skills in the workplace through apprenticeship


The integration of learning and work 2: establishing oneself in the workplace

  • Demonstrating credentials as a competent doctor in a post colonial cognitive community

  • Adjusting to UK professional and organizational cultures

  • Deskilling to facilitate sponsorship relationships


The integration of learning and work 3: How junior doctors balance study and work

  • Long unsocial hours

  • Universal for junior doctors

  • Differential access to study leave

  • Mitigated by working time directive


The integration of learning and work 4: why medics remain

  • Family commitments

  • Commitment to socialized medicine

  • Resources to be a good doctor

  • Limited options at home

  • Questionable utility of migrants’ new skills in South Asia

  • Material factors not mentioned


The utility of migrants’ specialist skills for South Asia

  • Conflicting interests:

    • Fill gaps in UK medical labour market

    • Training in high status competitive specialty

  • Vulnerability of immigration status constrains scope for career choice

  • Perceived discrimination against migrant doctors

  • Entry into geriatrics as a response to marginalisation

  • Skills in geriatric medicine not marketable in South Asia


Changing regulation of learning spaces: visas

  • Abolition of permit free training

  • Self sufficiency and the nation as the primary space for arranging medical provision

  • The end of non-EU medical migration?


Regulating learning spaces: implications for migrant doctors

  • Expensive UK qualifications invalidated

  • Many migrants unable to complete their training

  • Uncertainty, unemployment, financial loss and no transferable skills


Conclusions

  • Migration for training within networks framed by postcolonial relationships

  • The blurring between work and learning can lead to a conflict of interests

  • In this form of migration for learning, medics are vulnerable to changes in immigration and medical training regulations

  • The skills developed by migrants are a consequence of their responses to UK labour market conditions


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