Ming and qing dynasties
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Ming and Qing Dynasties. China Says to the West: We Have Nothing to Learn from You. China under the Ming Dynasty. China under the Ming Dynasty. Ming and Qing Dynasties. I. Politics II. Cultural/Intellectual III. Society IV. Economics V. China and the West. I. Politics.

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Ming and Qing Dynasties

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Ming and qing dynasties

Ming and Qing Dynasties

China Says to the West: We Have Nothing to Learn from You


China under the ming dynasty

China under the Ming Dynasty


China under the ming dynasty1

China under the Ming Dynasty


Ming and qing dynasties1

Ming and Qing Dynasties

  • I. Politics

  • II. Cultural/Intellectual

  • III. Society

  • IV. Economics

  • V. China and the West


I politics

I. Politics

  • A. Ming (= Bright) Dynasty (1368–1644)

  • 1. Hongwu (Hung-wu) (1368–1398)

  • a. overthrow of Yuan dynasty (1368)

  • b. contempt of Confucian scholar-administrators

  • 2. Yongle (Yung-le) (1402–1424)

  • a. journeys of Zhenghe (Cheng Ho) (1405–1433)

  • b. opening of Grand Canal (1415)


Hongwu hung wu 1368 1398

Hongwu (Hung-wu) (1368–1398)


Yongle yung le 1402 1424

Yongle (Yung-le) (1402–1424)


Imperial canal

Imperial Canal


Imperial canal at beijing

Imperial Canal at Beijing


I politics continued

I. Politics (continued)

  • A. Ming (= Bright) Dynasty (1368–1644) (continued)

  • 3. successors

  • a. ended foreign exploration (1433)

  • b. Japanese pirates (wako)/Ming imperial edict (1456)

  • c. forbade Chinese to travel abroad (early 16th century)

  • d. loss of vassal states of Annam, Tibet, and Mongolia

  • e. loss of northern Manchuria (1599)

  • f. defense of Korea (1592–1597)


I politics continued1

I. Politics (continued)

  • B. Qing (Ch’ing) (= Pure) (1644–1911)

  • 1. Nurhachu declared dynasty in Manchuria (1616)

  • 2. Abahai (Tai tsung) (r. 1627–1643)

  • a. Conquered Korea (1627)

  • b. Beseiged Beijing (1643)


I politics continued2

I. Politics (continued)

  • B. Qing (Ch’ing) (= Pure) (1644–1911)

  • 3. Kangxi (K’ang Hsi) (r. 1661–1722)

  • a. San-fan War (1673–1681)

  • b. last Ming general defeated (1683)

  • c. Treaty of Nerchinsk (1689)

  • d. forbade teaching of Christianity (1715)


The kangxi emperor as a young man

The Kangxi Emperor as a Young Man


The kangxi emperor on a hunt

The Kangxi Emperor on a Hunt


The kangxi emperor on tour

The Kangxi Emperor on Tour


The kangxi emperor returning from southern tour

The Kangxi Emperor Returning from Southern Tour


The kangxi emperor late in his reign

The Kangxi Emperor Late in His Reign


Emperor of china self portrait of kang hsi ed jonathan d spence

Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of Kang-Hsi, ed. Jonathan D. Spence

  • – relationship between hunting and war

  • – philosophy of education

  • – opinion of Westerners

  • – view of Western mathematics

  • – assessment of Galdan

  • – assessment of his own reign


I politics continued3

I. Politics (continued)

  • 4. Qianlong (Ch’ien-lung) (r. 1736–1796 [1799])

  • a. “We have no need of anyone. Go home! Take back your gifts.”

  • b. Letter to King George III (1793)


The qianlong ch ien lung emperor r 1736 1796 1799

The Qianlong (Ch’ien-lung) Emperor(r. 1736–1796 [1799])


Lord macartney and the qianlong emperor

Lord Macartney and the Qianlong Emperor


The qianlong emperor practicing calligraphy

The Qianlong Emperor Practicing Calligraphy


Ii cultural intellectual

II. Cultural/Intellectual

  • A. Confucianism (civil or religious?)

  • 1. Harmony and moral order

  • 2. Confucian relationships

  • a. Father – Son

  • b. Ruler – Minister

  • c. Husband – Wife

  • d. Elder Brother – Younger Brother

  • e. Friend – Friend

  • B. Buddhism


Ii cultural intellectual continued

II. Cultural/Intellectual (continued)

  • C. Jesuit Influence

  • 1. Francis Xavier (1506–1552)

  • 2. Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) [Li Madou] — Journals

  • 3. Adam Schall (1591–1666) — dynastic calendar reform

  • 4. Ferdinand Verbiest (1623–1688) — almanac, instruments, and perpetual calendar


Francis xavier 1506 1552

Francis Xavier (1506–1552)


Matteo ricci 1552 1610 li madou

Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) [Li Madou]


Matteo ricci 1552 1610 li madou1

Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) [Li Madou]


Adam schall 1591 1666

Adam Schall (1591–1666)


Iii society

III. Society

  • A. Ranking of Social Classes

  • 1. Scholar-administrators (shenshi)2. Peasants

  • 3. Artisans and craftsmen

  • 4. Merchants

  • B. Status of Women

  • C. Population


Iv economics

IV. Economics

  • A. Porcelain

  • 1. Blue-and-white (cobalt from Persia)

  • 2. Sweet white (tian bai)

  • 3. European imitations: Delftware and Soft-paste

  • B. Silk


Ming porcelain plate

Ming Porcelain Plate


Qing vase

Qing Vase


V china and europe

V. China and Europe

  • Two Approaches

  • 1. Sino-Western relations in light of Europe’s and America’s rapid development during the 19th and 20th centuries

  • 2. Study what was there already. Why is it that China could and did take this attitude Europe and America? What enabled China to be so self-confident, so culturally and politically secure?


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