2011-12 Principal Performance Review (PPR)
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2011-12 Principal Performance Review (PPR) . September 2011. AGENDA. Overview of the Principal Performance Review (PPR) and Education Law 3012-c New Policies around Goals and Objectives for 2011-12 Setting Goals and Objectives Action Planning Evidence Scoring Guidelines.

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Agenda
AGENDA

  • Overview of the Principal Performance Review (PPR) and Education Law 3012-c

  • New Policies around Goals and Objectives for 2011-12

  • Setting Goals and Objectives

  • Action Planning

  • Evidence

  • Scoring Guidelines



Principal performance review ppr

PRINCIPAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW (PPR) EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

The PPR was established in 2007 as an evaluative tool to measure principal performance as part of a joint agreement between the CSA and the DOE.

The Principal Performance Review (PPR) offers an opportunity to:

Examine the progress your school and students have made and identify steps you can take to improve student outcomes over the upcoming school year.

Provide a common language and point of discussion for principals, superintendents, and network leaders to talk about the role of the principal and the steps each principal should be taking to achieve their goals for their school.

Provide a structured principal evaluation process to ensure fair and standardized ratings of principal performance across the system.


Components scoring criteria of the principal performance review ppr
COMPONENTS EDUCATION LAW 3012-c(SCORING CRITERIA) OF THE PRINCIPAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW (PPR)

The PPR results in an annual Final Rating for each principal based on the following components,

which will remain the same for this year:


Education law 3012 c

EDUCATION LAW 3012-c EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

In May 2010, New York State passed Education Law 3012-c establishing a comprehensive evaluation system for teachers and principals.

The new law requires each teacher and principal receive an annual professional performance review (APPR), resulting in a single composite effectiveness score and a rating of Highly Effective, Effective, Developing, or Ineffective.

3012-c does not go into effect for principals in New York City until a new collective bargaining agreement is reached with the CSA.


Principal support and evaluation in nyc
PRINCIPAL SUPPORT AND EVALUATION IN NYC EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

The DOE will explore ways to increase coherence across the ways NYC principals are supported and evaluated during the upcoming school year.

Network Team

Principal

Superintendent

Accountability Tools



NEW POLICIES AROUND THE PPR EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

  • The DOE has revised guidance for the goals and objectives section of the PPR for school year 2011-12 in order to:

    • Prepare the system for upcoming changes to the PPR based on the new State Education Law 3012-c.

    • Increase coherence around principals’ instructional priorities by aligning the citywide instructional expectations, principal capacity-building work, and PPR goals.


CHANGES FOR THE 2011-12 PPR EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

  • Goals and Objectives are now due to superintendents on October 14, 2011.

  • Principals must submit a minimum of 4 goals and a maximum of 5 goals.

  • Of the 4-5 goals each principal sets, at least two goals must be aligned to the 2011-12 citywide instructional expectations.

  • In alignment with 3012-c:

    • all principals must set at least one goal addressing the “principal’s contribution to improving teacher effectiveness”

    • “Other goals address quantifiable and verifiable improvements in academic results OR the school’s learning environment”

NOTE: Scoring criteria will not change for 2011-12.


Aligning goals to the 2011 12 citywide expectations
ALIGNING GOALS TO THE 2011-12 CITYWIDE EXPECTATIONS EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

  • All principals should align at least two of their goals to the citywide instructional expectations:

    • at least one goal that ensures they meet the expectations around engaging all students in at least one literacy and one math task embedded in a rigorous curriculum unit aligned to the Common Core

    • at least one goal around teacher effectiveness that ensures they meet the expectations around engaging in short, frequent cycles of classroom observation and feedback using a rubric that articulates clear expectations for teacher practice


What has stayed the same
WHAT HAS STAYED THE SAME? EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

  • Goals are measurable.

  • Goals are aligned to the needs and priorities of the school.

  • Goals are critical to school improvement.


Setting goals and objectives
Setting GOALS AND OBJECTIVES EDUCATION LAW 3012-c


What is the difference between a goal and an objective

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A GOAL AND AN OBJECTIVE? EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

For the purposes of the PPR:

A goal is an overarching desired outcome, without setting a particular target.

An objective is a measurable target.


Goals and objectives template

Identify a EDUCATION LAW 3012-cminimum of four and a maximum of five goals in narrative form as outlined below.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES TEMPLATE


Guidelines for teacher effectiveness goals
GUIDELINES FOR TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS GOALS EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

  • Can be process-oriented or outcome-oriented

  • In alignment with 3012-c, teacher effectiveness goals should focus on one or more of these categories:

    • Principal actions to implement and conduct teacher evaluation effectively (e.g., quality of feedback provided to teachers)

    • Evidence of improved effectiveness of teaching staff (e.g., improved retention of high performers)

    • Facilitation of teacher participation in professional development opportunities

    • Goals about the Common Core instructional expectation couldfit in this category at principal’s discretion (e.g., a goal around professional development for a teacher team to produce Common Core-aligned curricular units and tasks).


  • Guidelines for all other goals
    GUIDELINES FOR All OTHER GOALS EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

    • Must be outcome-oriented

    • In alignment with 3012-c, all other principal goals (not addressing teacher effectiveness) must address “quantifiable and verifiable improvements”

    • Goals must be based on measurable outcomes supported by concrete evidence that they were (or were not) obtained based on:

      • Improvements in “academic results” OR

      • improvements in “the school’s learning environment,” resulting from the principal’s leadership

    • Goals about the Common Core instructional expectation could fit in this category at principal’s discretion (e.g., XX% of students move up at least one level in a particular category within a Common Core-aligned rubric developed by teachers)


    Using data to identify the needs of the school
    USING DATA TO IDENTIFY THE NEEDS OF THE SCHOOL EDUCATION LAW 3012-c

    • Consult multiple sources of data when defining goals and objectives, including:

      • Progress Report outcomes across all measures

      • Quality Review report focusing, in particular, on identified areas for improvement

      • CEP

      • State accountability outcomes

      • Teacher and student data

      • Teacher, student, and/or parent responses on the NYC School Survey


    Potential guiding questions for identifying the needs of the school

    POTENTIAL GUIDING QUESTIONS FOR IDENTIFYING THE NEEDS OF THE SCHOOL

    Based on your school’s data, what goals will enable your school to achieve stronger student outcomes by June 2012?

    How can your school make adjustments to improve specific categories on your school’s Progress Report?

    What strategic steps can you take to increase coherence and consistency in instruction and/or systems to improve your Quality Review rating?

    How can your school’s structures and strategies be improved to target student outcomes, as identified by your schools NCLB Differentiated Accountability Status and/or PLA identification?

    What are your students’ learning needs across different sub-groups and what adjustments need to be made to address those needs?

    Given various levels of expertise among your teachers, what differentiated professional learning will result in improved teacher effectiveness to maximize student outcomes?

    Has your school adopted a rubric for teacher evaluation? What is the professional development plan around this rubric?

    What is your process for teacher feedback?




    Developing an action plan

    DEVELOPING AN ACTION PLAN SCHOOL

    • Potential Guiding Questions for Designing your Action Plan

    • How will you use resources (fiscal and talent) to help you accomplish your goals and objectives?

    • 2. How will all the stakeholders factor into accomplishing your goals and objectives?

    The action plan in your PPR should describe how you will attain your goals and objectives.

    This section should include the steps and actions for meeting goals and objectives (staffing, scheduling, funding plans, etc.)



    Evidence
    EVIDENCE SCHOOL



    Evidence for goals and objectives
    EVIDENCE FOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES SCHOOL

    Example types of measurable evidence that could be used for goals focused on…

    The Principal’s Contribution

    to Improving Teacher Effectiveness

    Quantifiable and Verifiable improvements in Academic Results

    Quantifiable and Verifiable improvements the School’s Learning Environment

    • Number or frequency of teacher observations using a rubric of teacher practice

    • Quality of feedback provided to teachers throughout the year

    • Teacher responses on School Survey

    • Facilitation of teacher participation in professional development opportunities, including teacher teams engaged in collaborative inquiry work

    • Increased teacher participation in teacher leader /shared leadership opportunities

    • Improvement in State test scores

    • Improvements in credit accumulation

    • Improvement of internal measures, such as scores on common assessments or rubrics

    • ****Note: targeted improvement could be across the entire school or focus on particular populations of students

    • Improved results in Academic Expectations, Communication, Engagement, or Safety & Respect from parents, teachers, or students on School Survey (i.e., improvement in percent of students who agree that “I feel welcome in my school.”)

    • Improvement in attendance data for school or for after-school programs

    • ***Note: targeted improvement could be across the entire school or focus on particular populations of students

    Goals about the Common Core instructional expectation could fall into any of these categories





    Compliance portion of ppr

    COMPLIANCE PORTION OF PPR SCHOOL

    Office of Compliance Services will assess each school’s year-end overall compliance with federal, state, and local laws, as well as Chancellor’s Regulations.

    For information regarding key dates and actions you may go to:

    https://portal.nycenet.edu/DOEPortal/Principals/LegalServices/GeneralCounsel/default.htm



    Calculating the final rating
    CALCULATING THE FINAL RATING SCHOOL

    • The Final Rating is subject to the superintendent’s consideration of the following guidelines which may result in a rating above or below the score on the Evaluation Rubric:

      • The principal’s short time as the school’s leader (including due to illness during the preceding year).

      • The principal’s recent appointment to turn around a previously failing school.

      • The principal’s achievement or surpassing of his/her goals and objectives.

      • Other circumstances of at least the same magnitude and effect.


    Decreasing the final rating

    DECREASING THE FINAL RATING SCHOOL

    A superintendent may decrease the Final Rating if:

    The principal receives an overall score of “0” on any component of Part B or any category, e.g. “Business and Funding,” listed in the compliance checklist or desk review, OR

    The principal engaged in any misconduct conduct during the year.

    Whether to decrease the rating depends upon the number of components or categories rated “0”, and/or the frequency and severity of the misconduct or inappropriate conduct as assessed by the superintendent.


    2011 12 ppr timeline
    2011-12 PPR TIMELINE SCHOOL

    October 14

    Goals and objectives due

    November 30

    Revisions to goals and objectives

    due

    January 30

    Mid-year PPR

    summary

    chart due

    • June 30

    • End-of-year PPR

    • summary

      • (superintendent will issue the final PPR shortly after issuance of the 2011-2012 Progress Report)


    Additional resources

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES SCHOOL

    See more information on the Principals’ Portal, (click “Principal Evaluations” from the “Leadership & Staff Development” drop-down menu).

    Contact your superintendent, network leader or Sarah Kleinhandler at [email protected] with any questions.


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