Finding Your Way in Postsecondary Education

Finding Your Way in Postsecondary Education PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 112 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Accessibility Notice. These slides can be provided in alternative formats upon requestPlease let us know if there's anything you would like us to explain more thoroughly during the presentation. 2. Presentation Goals. To provide an overview of the Midwest Alliance's mission and objectivesTo iden

Download Presentation

Finding Your Way in Postsecondary Education

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Finding Your Way in Postsecondary Education Dan Nordstrom Amy Fruchtman Liam Martin Christine Maidl-Pribbenow

2. Accessibility Notice These slides can be provided in alternative formats upon request Please let us know if there’s anything you would like us to explain more thoroughly during the presentation 2

3. Presentation Goals To provide an overview of the Midwest Alliance’s mission and objectives To identify issues affecting individuals with disabilities in STEM education and careers To familiarize you with our mentoring, enrichment, immersion, and internship support opportunities 3 Goals of today’s presentation Overview of the Midwest Alliance Description of Need we are addressing Opportunities for students and alumni Participant stories Wrap Up Goals of today’s presentation Overview of the Midwest Alliance Description of Need we are addressing Opportunities for students and alumni Participant stories Wrap Up

4. Our Questions to You Are you providing career guidance? Are you involved in transition planning? Are you or is someone you know a student with a disability who has plans for a postsecondary degree or certificate? How many students, possibly including yourself, do you know who are pursuing postsecondary education and have a definite interest in a STEM field? 4

5. What is the Midwest Alliance? 5 Consortium of 3 universities NSF-sponsored RDE – Research in Disabilities Education Program (in the Division of Human Resource Development, part of the Directorate for Education & Human Resources) 5-yr. grant project (2005-2010), with potential for renewalConsortium of 3 universities NSF-sponsored RDE – Research in Disabilities Education Program (in the Division of Human Resource Development, part of the Directorate for Education & Human Resources) 5-yr. grant project (2005-2010), with potential for renewal

6. Research in Disabilities Education Alliances for Students with Disabilities in STEM Increasing the participation of people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) academic programs and careers. The Research in Disabilities Education (RDE) program makes resources available to increase the participation and achievement of people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. The Research in Disabilities Education (RDE) program makes resources available to increase the participation and achievement of people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers.

7. Midwest Alliance Area 7 Grant awarded to the University of Wisconsin with partners at UI and UNI, but we work throughout the 3-state region, not only at our universities, but reaching out to individuals in high schools, technical colleges, 2-yr. colleges and universitiesGrant awarded to the University of Wisconsin with partners at UI and UNI, but we work throughout the 3-state region, not only at our universities, but reaching out to individuals in high schools, technical colleges, 2-yr. colleges and universities

8. Current NSF-Sponsored Alliances The Alliances for Students with Disabilities in STEM are awards designed to increase the number of students with disabilities completing associate, undergraduate and graduate degrees in STEM and to increase the number of students with disabilities entering our nation's science and engineering workforce.  There are currently 12 Alliance awards at the following institutions: University of Washington New Mexico State University University of Wisconsin - Madison The Ohio State University Wright State University City University of New York – Hunter College University of Southern Maine University of Hawaii University of Missouri – Kansas City Auburn University Tuskegee University Alabama State University Current NSF-Sponsored Alliances The Alliances for Students with Disabilities in STEM are awards designed to increase the number of students with disabilities completing associate, undergraduate and graduate degrees in STEM and to increase the number of students with disabilities entering our nation's science and engineering workforce.  There are currently 12 Alliance awards at the following institutions: University of Washington New Mexico State University University of Wisconsin - Madison The Ohio State University Wright State University City University of New York – Hunter College University of Southern Maine University of Hawaii University of Missouri – Kansas City Auburn University Tuskegee University Alabama State University

9. How do we Achieve our Mission? Midwest Alliance Goals: 1. Direct Student Impacts 2. Indirect Student Impacts 3. System Impacts 9 Mission: To reach out to students who are under-represented in post-secondary education and career opportunities, and increase their participation, persistence, and success in PSE academic programs and in employment Direct Student Impacts – Includes all activities provided that directly impact students with disabilities, their parents, and alumni with disabilities (Dan will elaborate Indirect Student Impacts – Focuses on activities directed toward teachers, faculty, staff, disability service providers, and employers. For example, these activities include presentations and workshops to pre-service and practicing teachers, special ed. teachers, assistive technology providers, and to direct support staff in university disability student service centers. By providing successful practice training to these individuals, students with disabilities are indirectly impacted by improved instruction, practices, and services. System Impacts – Is directed toward systems and policy changes that can be affected by Midwest Alliance staff and efforts. For example, creation and dissemination of successful practices in disability service provision and assistive technology affect the future policies and practices of people who intersect with students with disabilities. Actions that improve systems and policies changes affect those services and programs provided to future generations of students with disabilities and have a long-term effect. Goal three includes dissemination activities such as presentations and publications.Mission: To reach out to students who are under-represented in post-secondary education and career opportunities, and increase their participation, persistence, and success in PSE academic programs and in employment Direct Student Impacts – Includes all activities provided that directly impact students with disabilities, their parents, and alumni with disabilities (Dan will elaborate Indirect Student Impacts – Focuses on activities directed toward teachers, faculty, staff, disability service providers, and employers. For example, these activities include presentations and workshops to pre-service and practicing teachers, special ed. teachers, assistive technology providers, and to direct support staff in university disability student service centers. By providing successful practice training to these individuals, students with disabilities are indirectly impacted by improved instruction, practices, and services. System Impacts – Is directed toward systems and policy changes that can be affected by Midwest Alliance staff and efforts. For example, creation and dissemination of successful practices in disability service provision and assistive technology affect the future policies and practices of people who intersect with students with disabilities. Actions that improve systems and policies changes affect those services and programs provided to future generations of students with disabilities and have a long-term effect. Goal three includes dissemination activities such as presentations and publications.

10. What do we mean by STEM? Our definition of STEM includes traditional science, technology, engineering, and math fields AND… social science fields including psychology, economics, anthropology, criminology, social work, and sociology. 10 Broader than the traditional fields classified as STEMBroader than the traditional fields classified as STEM

11. Midwest Alliance Staff Jay Martin, Ph.D. Principal Investigator Professor, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Area of Research: Design of Assistive Technology Greg Stefanich, Ph.D., Co-Director and Education Coordinator Regents Professor, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Northern Iowa Brad Hedrick, Ph.D., Co-Director and Severe Physical Disabilities Coordinator Director, Division of Disability Resources and Education Services, University of Illinois Kim Collins, Ph.D., Psychological Disabilities Coordinator Asst. Dir., Academic Disability Support Services, Division of Disability Resources and Education Services, University of Illinois 11

12. Midwest Alliance Staff Amy Fruchtman, MS, CCC-SLP, Project Manager Clinical Faculty Member, Dept. of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison Dan Nordstrom, MSSW, Outreach Coordinator Academic Staff, Dept. of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison Michelle Priddy, MS, Outreach Coordinator Academic Staff, Division of Disability Resources and Education Services, University of Illinois Liam Martin, BA, Mentoring Program Assistant Coordinator Research Intern, University of Wisconsin-Madison 12

13. Midwest Alliance Evaluator Christine Maidl-Pribbenow, PhD. Associate Scientist, Wisconsin Center for Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison 13

14. Partnerships and Stakeholders Midwest Advisory Board Wide variety of partners and collaborators at the secondary and post-secondary education levels, including students, educators, administrators Wide variety of partners and collaborators representing other grant projects, agencies and organizations Advisory Board = National and Local advisory boards comprised of a total of 25 individuals who offer expertise and guidance. Educators, policy analysts/consultants, students, disability student service providers, industry representatives, and colleagues from other NSF-funded alliances at universities throughout the country. Other (Wisconsin) partners include: MMSD, WTCS, MATC, WI CESAs, UW-CREATe, UW Nancoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC), UW Center for Biology Education, Delta, AAPD…. AHEAD, AAAS…Advisory Board = National and Local advisory boards comprised of a total of 25 individuals who offer expertise and guidance. Educators, policy analysts/consultants, students, disability student service providers, industry representatives, and colleagues from other NSF-funded alliances at universities throughout the country. Other (Wisconsin) partners include: MMSD, WTCS, MATC, WI CESAs, UW-CREATe, UW Nancoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC), UW Center for Biology Education, Delta, AAPD…. AHEAD, AAAS…

15. Examples of Existing Disparities Under-Representation in Postsecondary Education 15 It’s appropriate here to quickly review some of the statistics that demonstrate disparities that exist in levels of education and employment for individuals with disabilities vs. those without. This table shows that young people with disabilities have less than a high school degree The attainment slide shows of the total population with and without reported disabilities, what educational level has been achieved by age 18-34.  So in other words, for all people with disabilities, 23 percent had not earned a high school degree.  This is in contrast to those without reported disabilities, with 13 percent not attaining a high school degree.  For high school graduates, 32 percent w/disabilities, 24 percent w/o.  The other striking finding: 3 times as many had received a bachelor's or higher for those not reporting a disability. It’s appropriate here to quickly review some of the statistics that demonstrate disparities that exist in levels of education and employment for individuals with disabilities vs. those without. This table shows that young people with disabilities have less than a high school degree The attainment slide shows of the total population with and without reported disabilities, what educational level has been achieved by age 18-34.  So in other words, for all people with disabilities, 23 percent had not earned a high school degree.  This is in contrast to those without reported disabilities, with 13 percent not attaining a high school degree.  For high school graduates, 32 percent w/disabilities, 24 percent w/o.  The other striking finding: 3 times as many had received a bachelor's or higher for those not reporting a disability.

16. Under-Employment in the Workforce 16

17. Recent Statistics The employment rate for civilians (age 16-64) with a disability is 36% (U.S.) and 42% (Wisc.) compared to 75% (U.S.) and 79.9% for people of the same age without a disability The highest level of educational attainment for civilians with a disability (age 18-34) was 7.7% compared to 24% for people of the same age without a disability Source: http://disabilitycompendium.org 17

18. STEM and Employment of People with Disabilities “… the employment rate for scientists and engineers with disabilities is 83 percent, much better than the estimated 26 percent for the overall US population with disabilities.” (Bonetta, p. 1162) 18 These statistics suggest that the engineering and science fields provide careers in which individuals with disabilities can find success.These statistics suggest that the engineering and science fields provide careers in which individuals with disabilities can find success.

19. Activity – Group Discussion Please discuss these questions in small groups and be prepared to share your main points with the large group (5-10 minutes) Are there students out there who are not going on to postsecondary education, but who could? What are some of the main disability-related barriers preventing students from going to college? 19

20. What can we do to Help? Enrichment and Immersion Opportunities Internship placements Mentorships Resource Referrals 20

21. Enrichment Opportunities Partner with existing bridge programs Partner with youth leadership programs Sponsor campus tours and transition events Co-sponsor summer camps, workshops, and career expositions 21

22. Campus Tours 22

23. 2009 Design Camp at University of Illinois – Champaign Urbana 23

24. Internship Placements Provide accommodations and placement support 40 hours - High School Students 80 hours - Postsecondary Students and Alumni Must be in a STEM related placement Stipends of $500-$1,000 Must be in a STEM field Stipend of $500 for High School Students or $1,000 for Postsecondary Students 24

25. Internship Resources 25

26. Types of Placements 26

27. Mentorships 16 hours long Online or Face-to-Face One-on-One Matches Background checks performed Mentors have or are pursuing STEM degrees $200 Stipend for Mentees $300 Stipend for Mentors (2 Mentees Maximum) 27

28. Best Practices for Mentoring MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership - www.mentoring.org 28 Support of Mentoring partnerships Provide best practices in mentoring Advocate for mentoring initiatives Support of Mentoring partnerships Provide best practices in mentoring Advocate for mentoring initiatives

29. Activities for Mentees 29

30. Additional Support to Mentors and Mentees E-Groups (Google Groups) Mentor Training Troubleshooting (Students, Parents, Teachers, and Others) 30

31. Mentoring Activity In pairs, try to solve the following problem: The mentee has trouble focusing for long periods of time and is easily distracted by a lot of noise and activity.  The mentee brings this problem up to his/her mentor and wants to try to find a solution workaround for exams.  Try to emphasize self advocacy in your response. 31

32. Evaluation Outcomes Methods: Common Data Elements, pre- and post-surveys Interviews Continuation with Midwest 32

33. CDE Survey Respondents by State (n=20) 33

34. Participant Outcomes 34 Interest in STEM: 15% said it Significantly Increased; 35% said it had Slightly Increased; 40% said their interest had Stayed the Same, and two said that their interest had Slightly Decreased. Students’ beliefs that they could succeed in math and science and that doing so was important, increased in a positive direction.

35. Level of agreement with statements on CDE 35

36. Participant Stories I would totally recommend it—it helped me very much. It got me to narrow down what I wanted to do and maybe it would help the others to know what they want to do in their real job. -Intern 36

37. Participant Stories I had a great time being a mentor. This was my second time being a mentor for Midwest and many valuable things happened during this session. My mentee for this session was a college freshman. For the first time, I notice several differences between the freshman year of college and each subsequent year thereafter. This realization helped me to think differently about some of the questions that my mentee brought up. -Mentor 37

38. Kevin Fritz 38

39. Takeaway Points High School students may have other interests than STEM – our program is open to all Our aim is to open pathways and unlock gates for students at the postsecondary level We hope that through our program students will make more informed choices about what degree to ultimately choose 39

40. Any Questions or Comments? 40

41. Contact us for more information! The Midwest Alliance 1975 Willow Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (608) 890-0992 V/TTY (608) 262-6466 Fax [email protected] www.stemmidwest.org To Subscribe to Our Newsletter send a blank email to: [email protected] 41

42. Resources for Further Reading Stumbo, N., Lindahl-Lewis, P., Blegen, A. R. (2008). Two Mentorship Case Studies of High School and University Students with Disabilities: Milestones and Lessons. Journal of Rehabilitation, 74(3), 45-51. Whelley, T.A., Radke, R., Burgstahler, S., Christ, T. W. (2003). Mentors, Advisors, Role Models & Peer Supporters: Career Development Relationships and Individuals with Disabilities. American Rehabilitation, 27(1), 42-49. Funded by the National Science Foundation (#HRD0533197) 42

  • Login