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WARM UP—Activating Prior Knowledge. What do you already know about poetry? List as many things as you can. You may include famous poets, poetry terms, poetic elements, etc. WARM UP--Review.

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WARM UP—Activating Prior Knowledge

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WARM UP—Activating Prior Knowledge

What do you already know about poetry? List as many things as you can. You may include famous poets, poetry terms, poetic elements, etc.


WARM UP--Review

In a brief paragraph, explain how poetry might relate to painting, sculpting, or art of other mediums. Why do you think human beings need artistic outlets to express themselves?


Today’s Learning Goal

I will learn the definitions of various poetry terms and practice identifying poetic elements by taking notes and reading children’s poems.


What is “Poetry?”

  • Writing that creates a intense imaginative awareness of experience in language

    • Words are chosen and arranged to produce a specific emotional response

    • Response created through meaning, sound, and rhythm


Types of Poetry

  • Narrative Poetry

  • Sonnets


Narrative Poetry

  • Poetry created to tell a story

  • Uses Imagery

    • Sensory details that create a certain pictures in the reader’s mind.


I'll tell you the story of Cloony the ClownWho worked in a circus that came through town.His shoes were too big and his hat was too small,But he just wasn't, just wasn't funny at all.He had a trombone to play loud silly tunes,He had a green dog and a thousand balloons.He was floppy and sloppy and skinny and tall,But he just wasn't, just wasn't funny at all.And every time he did a trick,Everyone felt a little sick.And every time he told a joke,Folks sighed as if their hearts were broke.And every time he lost a shoe,Everyone looked awfully blue.And every time he stood on his head,Everyone screamed, "Go back to bed!"And every time he made a leap,Everybody fell asleep.And every time he ate his tie,Everyone began to cry.And Cloony could not make any moneySimply because he was not funny.One day he said, "I'll tell this townHow it feels to be an unfunny clown."And he told them all why he looked so sad,And he told them all why he felt so bad.He told of Pain and Rain and Cold,He told of Darkness in his soul,

And after he finished his tale of woe,Did everyone cry? Oh no, no, no,They laughed until they shook the treesWith "Hah-Hah-Hahs" and "Hee-Hee-Hees."They laughed with howls and yowls and shrieks,They laughed all day, they laughed all week,They laughed until they had a fit,They laughed until their jackets split.The laughter spread for miles aroundTo every city, every town,Over mountains, 'cross the sea,From Saint Tropez to Mun San Nee.And soon the whole world rang with laughter,Lasting till forever after,While Cloony stood in the circus tent,With his head drooped low and his shoulders bent.And he said,"THAT IS NOT WHAT I MEANT -I'M FUNNY JUST BY ACCIDENT."And while the world laughed outside.Cloony the Clown sat down and cried.

Example Narrative Poem: “Clooney the Clown” by Shel Silverstein


Sonnet

  • A poem consisting of fourteen lines of iambic pentameter

    • Italian (Petrarchan) Sonnet

    • Shakespearean (Elizabethan or English) Sonnet


Shakespearean Sonnet

  • Consists of three quatrains and a final rhyming couplet

  • Rhyme Scheme = abab, cdcd, efef, gg

  • Usually, the question or theme is set forth in the quatrains while the answer or resolution appears in the final couplet


SAMPLE SHAKESPEAREAN SONNET: Sonnet 29

When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless criesAnd look upon myself and curse my fate, 

Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd,Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; 

Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;

For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth bringsThat then I scorn to change my state with kings.


Meter

Foot

Verse

Rhyme

End Rhyme

Rhyme Scheme

Stanza

Couplet

Triplet

Quatrain

Quintet

Sestet

Septet

Octave

Poetic Forms


Meter

  • The patterned repetition of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry.

    • Foot: the smallest repeated pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a poetic line.

      • Iambic: an unstressed followed by a stressed syllable.

    • Verse: is a metric line of poetry named according to the number of feet and type of feet composing it.

      • Pentameter: five feet (penta meaning five)


Iambic Pentameter

  • Iambic = unstressed followed by a stressed syllable

  • Pentameter = five feet

  • “Iambic Pentameter” = fiveiambic feet or five sets of (unstressed followed by a stressed syllable)


SAMPLE: Iambic Pentameter

I all alone beweep my outcast state 


Rhyme

  • The similarity or likeness of sound existing between two words: (sat and cat)

    • End Rhyme: the rhyming of words that appear at the ends of two or more lines of poetry.

    • Rhyme Scheme: The pattern of end rhymes used in a poem usually marked by letters to symbolize rhyming correspondence


SAMPLE: End Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme

When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless criesAnd look upon myself and curse my fate, 

Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd,Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; 

Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;

For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth bringsThat then I scorn to change my state with kings.


Stanza

  • A division of poetry named for the number of lines it contains:

    • Couplet: two lines

    • Triplet: three lines

    • Quatrain: four lines

    • Quintet: five lines

    • Sestet: six lines

    • Septet: seven lines

    • Octave: Eight lines


When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless criesAnd look upon myself and curse my fate, 

Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd,Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; 

Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;

For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth bringsThat then I scorn to change my state with kings.

QUATRAIN

QUATRAIN

QUATRAIN

COUPLET

SAMPLE STANZAS: Shakespearean Sonnet


Figurative Language

  • Simile

  • Metaphor

  • Extended Metaphor

  • Personification


Simile

  • A comparison of two unlike things using the words like or as.

  • EXAMPLES:

    • “She was as beautiful as a diamond.”

    • “She ran like a swift and violent wind.”


Metaphor

  • A comparison of two unlike things in which no word of comparison (as or like) is used.

  • EXAMPLES:

    • “The beautiful woman was a diamond amongst dull stones.”

    • “The girl was a violent running wind.”


Extended Metaphor

  • A metaphor introduced and then further developed throughout all or part of a literary work especially a poem


Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveler, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I couldTo where it bent in the undergrowth;Then took the other, as just as fair,And having perhaps the better claimBecause it was grassy and wanted wear,Though as for that the passing thereHad worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally layIn leaves no step had trodden black.Oh, I marked the first for another day!Yet knowing how way leads on to wayI doubted if I should ever come back.I shall be telling this with a sighSomewhere ages and ages hence:Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference. 

SAMPLE: Extended Metaphor“The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost


Personification

  • A literary device in which the author/poet speaks of or describes an animal, object, or idea as if it were a person

  • EXAMPLES:

    • “The violent wind ran around my room knocking everything to the floor.”

    • “The tree reached out its arms and hugged the wind.”


Activity: Identifying Figurative Language

  • There will be a line of words using figurative language posted on the screen.

  • Copy the line in your ENGLISH NOTEBOOK.

  • With your table partner, try and identify whether the line is an example of a simile, metaphor, or personification.


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “They fought like cats and dogs.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “He had a heart of stone.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “She didn’t blend in; she stuck out like a sore thumb.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “Opportunity knocked at my door.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “The wind tapped like a tired man.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “The vines wove their fingers together to form a braid.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “Time steals from us everyday.”


Simile, Metaphor, or Personification?

  • Copy this line and identify with your table partner:

    “The sun played hide and seek with the clouds.”


Activity: Identifying Figurative Language in Poetry


IDENTIFYING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: Identify as many forms of figurative language possible

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head;And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.


IDENTIFYING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: Identify as many forms of figurative language possible

The funniest things about him is the way he likes to grow-Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow;For he sometimes shoots up taller like an India rubber ball,And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all.


IDENTIFYING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: Identify as many forms of figurative language possible

He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play,And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.He stays so close beside me, he's a coward you can see;I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me!


IDENTIFYING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: Identify as many forms of figurative language possible

One morning, very early, before the sun was up,I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head,Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.


“My Shadow”   ~Robert Louis Stevenson

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head;And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.

The funniest things about him is the way he likes to grow-Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow;For he sometimes shoots up taller like an India rubber ball,And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all.

He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play,And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.He stays so close beside me, he's a coward you can see;I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me!

One morning, very early, before the sun was up,I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head,Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.


EXIT REFLECTION

In a brief paragraph, define one new poetry term you learned today and provide an example.


EXIT REFLECTION

In a brief paragraph, define one form of figurative language(simile, metaphor, personification, etc.) that we learned today and write a creative example following the definition you provide.


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