Chapter 5 energy
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 55

Chapter 5 Energy PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Chapter 5 Energy. Ying Yi PhD. Forms of Energy. Mechanical Focus for now May be kinetic (associated with motion) or potential (associated with position) Chemical Electromagnetic Nuclear. Energy Conservation Assumption.

Download Presentation

Chapter 5 Energy

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Chapter 5 energy

Chapter 5 Energy

Ying Yi PhD

PHYS I @ HCC


Forms of energy

Forms of Energy

  • Mechanical

    • Focus for now

    • May be kinetic (associated with motion) or potential (associated with position)

  • Chemical

  • Electromagnetic

  • Nuclear

PHYS I @ HCC


Energy conservation assumption

Energy Conservation Assumption

  • The total amount of energy in the Universe never changes. Energy can be transformed from one form to another.

    • Essential to the study of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, astronomy

  • Can be used in place of Newton’s laws to solve certain problems more simply

PHYS I @ HCC


Outline

Outline

  • Work

  • Work-Energy Theorem

  • Potential Energy

  • Gravitational Potential Energy

  • Spring Potential Energy

  • Power

PHYS I @ HCC


Work link between force and energy

Work (Link between force and energy)

  • Definition: The work, W, done by a constant force on an object is defined as the product of the component of the force along the direction of displacement and the magnitude of the displacement

  • Units: Newton • meter = Joule

    • N • m = J

    • J = kg • m2 / s2

PHYS I @ HCC


Work same direction

Work (Same direction)

  • W = F x

    • This equation applies when the force is in the same direction as the displacement

    • are in the same direction

PHYS I @ HCC


Work different direction

Work (Different Direction)

  • W = (F cos)x

    • F is the magnitude of the force

    • Δ x is the magnitude of the object’s displacement

    • q is the angle between

Question: Does work have anything to do with velocity and acceleration? Is work a scalar or vector?

PHYS I @ HCC


Work multiple forces

Work (Multiple forces)

If there are multiple forces acting on an object, the total work done is the algebraic sum of the amount of work done by each force

PHYS I @ HCC


False or true questions

False or True Questions

  • When the force is perpendicular to the displacement cos 90° = 0, the work done by a force is zero.

  • Work can be positive and negative.

True

True

PHYS I @ HCC


When work is zero

When Work is Zero?

  • Displacement is horizontal

  • Force is vertical

  • cos 90° = 0

PHYS I @ HCC


Work can be positive or negative

Work Can Be Positive or Negative

  • Work is positive when lifting the box

  • Work would be negative if lowering the box

    • The force would still be upward, but the displacement would be downward

PHYS I @ HCC


Work and dissipative forces

Work and Dissipative Forces

  • Work can be done by friction

  • The energy lost to friction by an object goes into heating both the object and its environment

    • Some energy may be converted into sound

  • For now, the phrase “Work done by friction” will denote the effect of the friction processes on mechanical energy alone

PHYS I @ HCC


Example 5 1 sledding

Example 5.1 Sledding

An Eskimo returning from a successful fishing trip pulls a sled loaded with salmon. The total mass of the sled and salmon is 50.0 kg, and the Eskimo exerts a force of magnitude 1.20×102N on the sled by pulling on the rope.

(a) How much work does he do on the sled if the rope is horizontal to the ground (Ɵ=0° in Fig. 5.6) and he pulls the sled 5.00 m?

(b) How much work does he do on the sled if Ɵ=30.0° and he pulls the sled the same distance? (Treat the sled as a point particle, so details such as the point of attachment of the rope make no difference.)

(c) At a coordinate position of 12.4 m, the Eskimo lets up on the applied force. A friction force of 45.0 N between the ice and the sled brings the sled to rest at a coordinate position of 18.2 m. How much work does friction do on the sled?

PHYS I @ HCC


Work varying force

Work (Varying Force)

  • The work done by a variable force acting on an object that undergoes a displacement is equal to the area under the graph of Fx versus x

PHYS I @ HCC


Chapter 5 energy

Spring Example

  • Spring is slowly stretched from 0 to xmax

  • W = ½kx²

PHYS I @ HCC


Example 5 15 work required to stretch a spring

Example 5.15 Work required to stretch a Spring

One end of a horizontal spring (k=80.0 N/m) is held fixed while an external force is applied to the free end, stretching it slowly from xA=0 to xB=4.00 cm. (a) find the work done by the applied force on the spring. (b) Find the additional work done in stretching the spring from xB=4.00 cm to xC=7.00 cm.

PHYS I @ HCC


Work kinetic energy

Work & Kinetic Energy

Recall motion equation:

Work Energy Theory

PHYS I @ HCC


Kinetic energy

Kinetic Energy

  • Energy associated with the motion of an object

  • Scalar quantity with the same units as work

  • Work is related to kinetic energy

PHYS I @ HCC


Work kinetic energy theorem

Work-Kinetic Energy Theorem

  • When work is done by a net force on an object and the only change in the object is its speed, the work done is equal to the change in the object’s kinetic energy

    • Speed will increase if work is positive

    • Speed will decrease if work is negative

PHYS I @ HCC


Example 5 3 collision analysis

Example 5.3 Collision Analysis

The driver of a 1.00×103 kg car traveling on the interstate at 35.0 m/s (nearly 80.0 mph) slams on his brakes to avoid hitting a second vehicle in front of him, which had come to rest because of congestion ahead (Fig. 5.9). After the brakes are applied, a constant kinetic friction force of magnitude 8.00×103N acts on the car. Ignore air resistance. (a) At what minimum distance should the brakes be applied to avoid a collision with the other vehicle? (b) If the distance between the vehicles is initially only 30.0 m, at what speed would the collision occurs?

PHYS I @ HCC


Types of forces

Types of Forces

  • There are two general kinds of forces

    • Conservative

      • Work and energy associated with the force can be recovered

    • Nonconservative

      • The forces are generally dissipative and work done against it cannot easily be recovered

PHYS I @ HCC


Conservative forces

Conservative Forces

  • A force is conservative if the work it does on an object moving between two points is independent of the path the objects take between the points

  • Examples of conservative forces include:

    • Gravity

    • Spring force

    • Electromagnetic forces

PHYS I @ HCC


Nonconservative forces

Nonconservative Forces

  • A force is nonconservative if the work it does on an object depends on the path taken by the object between its final and starting points.

  • Examples of nonconservative forces

    • Kinetic friction, air drag, propulsive forces

PHYS I @ HCC


Nonconservative force friction

Nonconservative Force (Friction)

  • The blue path is shorter than the red path

  • The work required is less on the blue path than on the red path

  • Friction depends on the path and so is a non-conservative force

PHYS I @ HCC


Work done by conservative force

Work done by conservative force

Gravitational potential energy

PHYS I @ HCC


Potential energy

Potential Energy

  • Potential energy is associated with the position of the object within some system

    • Potential energy is a property of the system, not the object

    • A system is a collection of objects interacting via forces or processes that are internal to the system

PHYS I @ HCC


Work and potential energy

Work and Potential Energy

  • For every conservative force a potential energy function can be found

  • Evaluating the difference of the function at any two points in an object’s path gives the negative of the work done by the force between those two points

PHYS I @ HCC


Gravitational potential energy

Gravitational Potential Energy

  • Gravitational Potential Energy is the energy associated with the relative position of an object in space near the Earth’s surface

    • Objects interact with the earth through the gravitational force

    • Actually the potential energy is for the earth-object system

PHYS I @ HCC


Work and gravitational potential energy

Work and Gravitational Potential Energy

  • PE = mgy

  • Units of Potential Energy are the same as those of Work and Kinetic Energy

PHYS I @ HCC


Work and gravitational potential energy1

Work and Gravitational Potential Energy

  • PE = mgy

  • Units of Potential Energy are the same as those of Work and Kinetic Energy

PHYS I @ HCC


Work energy theorem extended

Work-Energy Theorem, Extended

  • The work-energy theorem can be extended to include potential energy:

  • If other conservative forces are present, potential energy functions can be developed for them and their change in that potential energy added to the right side of the equation

PHYS I @ HCC


Reference levels for gravitational potential energy

Reference Levels for Gravitational Potential Energy

  • Often the Earth’s surface

  • May be some other point suggested by the problem

  • Once the position is chosen, it must remain fixed for the entire problem

PHYS I @ HCC


Reference levels cont

Reference Levels, cont

  • At location A, the desk may be the convenient reference level

  • At location B, the floor could be used

  • At location C, the ground would be the most logical reference level

  • The choice is arbitrary, though

PHYS I @ HCC


Example 5 4 skis

Example 5.4 Skis

A 60.0 kg skier is at the top of a slope, as shown in Figure 5.14, At the initial point A, she is 10.0 m vertically above point B. (a) Setting the zero level for gravitational potential energy at B, find the gravitational potential energy of this system when the skier is at A and then at B. Finally, find the change in potential energy of the skier-Earth system at the skier goes from point A to point B. (b) Repeat this problem with the zero level at point A. (c) Repeat again, with the zero level 2.00 m higher than point B.

PHYS I @ HCC


Conservation of mechanical energy

Conservation of Mechanical Energy

  • Conservation in general

    • To say a physical quantity is conserved is to say that the numerical value of the quantity remains constant throughout any physical process although the quantities may change form

  • In Conservation of Energy, the total mechanical energy remains constant

    • In any isolated system of objects interacting only through conservative forces, the total mechanical energy of the system remains constant.

PHYS I @ HCC


Conservation of energy cont

Conservation of Energy, cont.

  • Total mechanical energy is the sum of the kinetic and potential energies in the system

    • Other types of potential energy functions can be added to modify this equation

PHYS I @ HCC


Problem solving with conservation of energy

Problem Solving with Conservation of Energy

  • Define the system

    • Verify that only conservative forces are present

  • Select the location of zero gravitational potential energy, where y = 0

    • Do not change this location while solving the problem

  • Identify two points the object of interest moves between

    • One point should be where information is given

    • The other point should be where you want to find out something

PHYS I @ HCC


Problem solving cont

Problem Solving, cont

  • Apply the conservation of energy equation to the system

    • Immediately substitute zero values, then do the algebra before substituting the other values

  • Solve for the unknown

    • Typically a speed or a position

    • Substitute known values

    • Calculate result

PHYS I @ HCC


Work energy with nonconservative forces

Work-Energy With Nonconservative Forces

  • If nonconservative forces are present, then the full Work-Energy Theorem must be used instead of the equation for Conservation of Energy

  • Often techniques from previous chapters will need to be employed

PHYS I @ HCC


Group problem

Group Problem

Waterslides are nearly frictionless, hence can provide bored students with high-speed thrills (Fig. 5.18). One such slide, DerStuka, named for the terrifying German dive bombers of World War II, is 72.0 feet high (21.9 m), found at Six Flags in Dallas, Texas. (a) Determine the speed of a 60.0 kg woman at the bottom of such a slide, assuming no friction is present. (b) If the woman is clocked at 18.0 m/s at the bottom of the slide, find the work done on the woman by friction.

PHYS I @ HCC


Potential energy stored in a spring

Potential Energy Stored in a Spring

  • Involves the spring constant, k

  • Hooke’s Law gives the force

    • F = - k x

      • F is the restoring force

      • F is in the opposite direction of x

      • k depends on how the spring was formed, the material it is made from, thickness of the wire, etc.

PHYS I @ HCC


Potential energy in a spring

Potential Energy in a Spring

  • Elastic Potential Energy

    • Related to the work required to compress a spring from its equilibrium position to some final, arbitrary, position x

PHYS I @ HCC


Spring potential energy example

Spring Potential Energy, Example

  • A) The spring is in equilibrium, neither stretched or compressed

  • B) The spring is compressed, storing potential energy

  • C) The block is released and the potential energy is transformed to kinetic energy of the block

PHYS I @ HCC


Work energy theorem including a spring

Work-Energy Theorem Including a Spring

  • Wnc = (KEf – KEi) + (PEgf – PEgi) + (PEsf – PEsi)

    • PEg is the gravitational potential energy

    • PEs is the elastic potential energy associated with a spring

    • PE will now be used to denote the total potential energy of the system

PHYS I @ HCC


Conservation of energy including a spring

Conservation of Energy Including a Spring

  • The PE of the spring is added to both sides of the conservation of energy equation

  • The same problem-solving strategies apply

PHYS I @ HCC


Example5 9 spring

Example5.9 Spring

A block with mass of 5.00 kg is attached to a horizontal spring with spring constant k=4.00×102N/m, as in Figure 5.21. The surface the block rests upon is frictionless. If the block is pulled out to xi=0.0500 m and released , (a) find the speed of the block when it first reaches the equilibrium point, (b) find the speed when x=0.0250 m, and (c) repeat part (a) if friction acts on the block, with coefficient µk=0.150.

PHYS I @ HCC


Nonconservative forces with energy considerations

Nonconservative Forces with Energy Considerations

  • When nonconservative forces are present, the total mechanical energy of the system is not constant

  • The work done by all nonconservative forces acting on parts of a system equals the change in the mechanical energy of the system

PHYS I @ HCC


Nonconservative forces and energy

Nonconservative Forces and Energy

  • In equation form:

  • The energy can either cross a boundary or the energy is transformed into a form of non-mechanical energy such as thermal energy

PHYS I @ HCC


Transferring energy

Transferring Energy

  • By Work

    • By applying a force

    • Produces a displacement of the system

  • Heat

    • The process of transferring heat by collisions between atoms or molecules

    • For example, when a spoon rests in a cup of coffee, the spoon becomes hot because some of the KE of the molecules in the coffee is transferred to the molecules of the spoon as internal energy

PHYS I @ HCC


Transferring energy1

Transferring Energy

  • Mechanical Waves

    • A disturbance propagates through a medium

    • Examples include sound, water, seismic

  • Electrical transmission

    • Transfer by means of electrical current

    • This is how energy enters any electrical device

PHYS I @ HCC


Transferring energy2

Transferring Energy

  • Electromagnetic radiation

    • Any form of electromagnetic waves

      • Light, microwaves, radio waves

    • For example

      • Cooking something in your microwave oven

      • Light energy traveling from the Sun to the Earth

PHYS I @ HCC


Notes about conservation of energy

Notes About Conservation of Energy

  • We can neither create nor destroy energy

    • Another way of saying energy is conserved

    • If the total energy of the system does not remain constant, the energy must have crossed the boundary by some mechanism

    • Applies to areas other than physics

PHYS I @ HCC


Power

Power

  • Often also interested in the rate at which the energy transfer takes place

  • Power is defined as this rate of energy transfer

  • SI units are Watts (W)

PHYS I @ HCC


Power cont

Power, cont.

  • US Customary units are generally hp

    • Need a conversion factor

    • Can define units of work or energy in terms of units of power:

      • kilowatt hours (kWh) are often used in electric bills

      • This is a unit of energy, not power

PHYS I @ HCC


Example 5 12 power

Example 5.12 Power

A 1.00×103 kg elevator car carries a maximum load of 8.00×102 kg. A constant frictional force of 4.00×103 N retards its motion upward, as in Figure 5.26. What minimum power, in kiloatts and in horsepower, must the motor deliver to lift the fully loaded elevator car at a constant speed of 3.00 m/s?

PHYS I @ HCC


  • Login