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Rooftop Maintenance Activities and Fall Protection Considerations PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Rooftop Maintenance Activities and Fall Protection Considerations. April 2009. One small disclaimer. This presentation focuses on fall hazard considerations for: maintenance activity on “flat” roofs. Does a fall hazard exist?.

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Rooftop Maintenance Activities and Fall Protection Considerations

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Rooftop maintenance activities and fall protection considerations l.jpg

Rooftop Maintenance Activitiesand Fall Protection Considerations

April 2009


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One small disclaimer

This presentation focuses on fall hazard considerations for:

  • maintenance activity

  • on “flat” roofs


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Does a fall hazard exist?

  • For each building, are employees working on roof protected from fall hazards?

    • Is roof that employees need to work on “flat”?

    • Parapets or railings for roof edges?

    • Screens around equipment

    • Rails or screens on skylights?

  • If not fully protected, assess the work locations and hazards


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Attitudes about working at height


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Attitudes about working at height


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Inventory tasks and locations

  • What are the tasks and specific locations for rooftop work?

  • What are the travel paths for those tasks and locations?


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Roof screens and distance from edge


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List of tasks

  • Repair/maintenance of equipment

    • HVAC, transmission/reception, lighting, web cam, weather monitoring, other

  • Window cleaning (clerestory and side of building)

  • Gutters and drains

  • Moving ballast in order to repair leaks

  • Repairing roof leaks

  • Flashing work

  • Replacement of equipment

  • Roof repair

  • Temporary installations or tasks

    • web cams, video taping for commencement, other

  • Inspection


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Travel path

  • Accessing roof levels

    • Ladders: fixed and portable

    • Hatches

  • Travel paths

    • Proximity to unprotected edges, skylights

  • Obstructions


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Path of travel to roof hatch

Planks over dead wall space


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Fall hazard survey

  • Type of hazard (fall from roof deck)

  • Configuration of hazard (layout)

  • Exposure rating (high, medium, low)

  • Frequency and duration of job

  • Height of potential fall/ severity level

  • Suggested solution

  • Type of rescue equipment (if required)


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Environmental factors

  • Electrical hazards

  • Unstable, uneven, slippery surfaces

  • Unguarded openings

  • Climatic and weather factors

  • Sharp objects and abrasive surfaces

  • Non-ionizing radiation

  • Other


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Non-ionizing radiation


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Fall protection hierarchy

  • Elimination or substitution

  • Passive fall protection

  • Fall restraint

  • Fall arrest

  • Administrative controls


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Fall protection hierarchy

1. Elimination or substitution;

2. Passive fall protection;

3. Fall restraint;

4. Fall arrest;

5. Administrative controls


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Do skylight screens work?Yes.


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Roof access and work policy

  • Does your policy address:

    • Who can access the roof

    • How is access controlled

    • Work on tasks with hazard assessment

    • Work on tasks without hazard assessment

      • Procedure for work on tasks without formal hazard assessment

    • Environmental conditions: night, winter, hazardous weather


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‘Temporary’ installation

Construction web camera, 18-24 months.


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Some questions

  • How far from an unprotected edge or opening is high, medium, and low exposure?

  • At what distance to an unprotected edge or opening does someone need a fall restraint or fall arrest system?

  • In which situations would we use administrative controls? In which situations would we never use administrative controls?


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Distance from edge, easy access


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What are the fall survey considerations?


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A

B

Distance from edge

How do you protect employees at A (2 ft from edge) and at B (20 ft from edge)?


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Any problem here?


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Protected access point

Note also unit in background, upper right.


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How do you protect employees?


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About 8 ft from edge


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Lights

Are these serviced with articulating lift? Or from the roof?


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Multiple considerations

Low slope on loose ballast stone.

Equipment on flat portion.

Gutters that need cleaning.


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I’ve done this hundreds of times. I know how towork near an edge.


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  • Presentation available at http://www.uwsa.edu/oslp/safety/uwsres/presentations.htm

  • Contact info:

    Daniel Karamanski

    University of Wisconsin System Administration

    Office of Safety and Loss Prevention

    [email protected]

    (608) 262-4792


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