the rhetorical situation:  five components of persuasion

the rhetorical situation: five components of persuasion PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Rhetorical Analysis. Rhetoric . The study of effective speaking and writingThe art of persuasion. Rhetorical Analysis. The Rhetorical Situation . P: purposeA: audienceP: pathosE: ethosL: logos. . Five concepts to help explore any rhetorical situation . Rhetorical Analysis. Purpose. What change does the writer/speaker want to effect?IMPORTANT: To ensure you have a clear understanding of purpose, you should be able to express this in terms of physical, tangible action.A writer may have mul9460

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the rhetorical situation: five components of persuasion

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1. Rhetorical Analysis The Rhetorical Situation: Five Components of Persuasion Preparation for Rhetorical Analysis

2. Rhetorical Analysis Rhetoric The study of effective speaking and writing The art of persuasion

3. Rhetorical Analysis The Rhetorical Situation P: purpose A: audience P: pathos E: ethos L: logos

4. Rhetorical Analysis Purpose What change does the writer/speaker want to effect? IMPORTANT: To ensure you have a clear understanding of purpose, you should be able to express this in terms of physical, tangible action. A writer may have multiple purposes

5. Rhetorical Analysis Audience All attempts to persuade must take into account the audience “Audience” includes three things: knowledge of audience’s values opportune timing proper fit with situation

6. Rhetorical Analysis Appeals Definition: Approaches to or ways of persuading a reader or listener Aristotle listed three appeals: Logos Pathos Ethos

7. Rhetorical Analysis Logos Appeal to logic or reason; logical Very rarely effective in persuasion “Reason is, and ought only to be, slave to the passions.” —David Hume

8. Rhetorical Analysis Common Logical Appeals Incontrovertible, indisputable facts Statistics Syllogistic structure CAUTION: Many appeals are clothed in logical apparel but are NOT pure reason. Evidence that relies on interpretation is not, strictly speaking, an appeal to logos.

9. Rhetorical Analysis Ethos Appeal of the writer’s character, credibility, trustworthiness (ethical) Attempts to gain the respect of the audience Often appeals to shared values—i.e., says “I’m one of you.”

10. Rhetorical Analysis Common Ethical Appeals Levels of diction: how a writer/speaker chooses words to address a particular audience Citing authorities (e.g., Einstein) Appearing humble, down to earth Employing humor Alluding to cultural, religious, literary values held by the audience

11. Rhetorical Analysis Pathos Appeal to emotion; passionate (pathetic) Attempts to draw on an audience’s pity, anger, hatred, etc. Powerful, truly persuasive speaking and writing is always filled with pathos

12. Rhetorical Analysis Common Emotional Appeals Diction Imagery Metaphor Syntax (*especially if syntax supports meaning)

13. Rhetorical Analysis Using It All It is possible—even preferable—for a writer or speaker to make multiple appeals at the same time. Use information about the rhetorical situation to analyze rhetoric question and to create your own arguments

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