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Consumer Requirement for the Smart House. Roy Brooker. TAHI Conference November 2004. Structure of Today\'s Talk. Introduction to Intertek Research & Performance Testing Background to Smart Homes research Results of DTI research project - 20 Essentials for Smart Homes

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consumer requirement for the smart house

Consumer Requirement for the Smart House

Roy Brooker

TAHI Conference November 2004

structure of today s talk
Structure of Today\'s Talk
  • Introduction to Intertek Research & Performance Testing
  • Background to Smart Homes research
  • Results of DTI research project - 20 Essentials for Smart Homes
  • Ongoing work for CENELEC SmartHouse “Code of Practice”
intertek rpt
Intertek RPT

Who are we?

  • Ex Consumers’ Association Research & Testing Centre
  • Now part of the ETL Semko Division of Intertek Group

What do we do?

  • Test products for consumers\' associations, retailers, manufacturers, importers, NGOs, and research for government

How do we do it?

  • Testing largely based on consumer habits/needs

Why do we do it?

  • To improve products, services and information for consumers
how do we do it
How do we do it?
  • Fridge-freezer testing at a range of ambient temperatures to find the most efficient models with the best performance characteristics
  • Syringe oven testing to find safe and effective methods of disposing of used syringes for Non-Governmental Organisations such as World Health Organisation
how do we do it5
How do we do it?
  • Testing of services such as ISPs, broadcast TV, retailer advice, Internet filters, Photo processing, etc
  • Acoustic measurements of consumer products. Sound pressure levels, sound power levels, sound quality.
how do we do it6
How do we do it?
  • Testing based on consumer habits and needs with our User Panel
  • Performance and usability testing of consumer electronic products. TV, audio, computers, telephones,cameras and gadgets in general.
smart homes projects
Smart Homes Projects
  • Testing of Social Alarms for Ricability.
  • Consumers’ Association research in 2000 for Joseph Rowntree Foundation on market potential for smart homes.
  • ANEC’s “Consumer Requirements in Information and Communications Technology” – Smart House section.
  • The “Which? Guide to Going Digital” book published 2001
  • Project on smart home safety for Consumers’ Association in 2001
  • NextWave DTI project on consumer requirements for smart homes delivered in 2004.
  • CENELEC SmartHouse Code of practice – “Consumer Requirements” section (in association with ANEC).
smart homes projects8
Smart Homes Projects
  • Testing of Social Alarms for Ricability.
  • Consumers’ Association research in 2000 for Joseph Rowntree Foundation on market potential for smart homes.
  • ANEC’s “Consumer Requirements in Information and Communications Technology” – Smart House section.
  • The “Which? Guide to Going Digital” book published 2001
  • Project on smart home safety for Consumers’ Association in 2001
  • NextWave DTI project on consumer requirements for smart homes delivered in 2004.
  • CENELEC SmartHouse Code of practice – “Consumer Requirements” section (in association with ANEC).
dti project aims
DTI Project - Aims
  • To gather information and opinions form consumers and consumer groups to inform the development of Smart Home technology
  • To highlight any areas of concern
  • To highlight any areas of particular interest for identified groups of consumers
  • To identify priorities for future research
research methods
Research Methods
  • Consumer questionnaires – Intertek User Panel and Forum for Assistive Technology
  • Consumer representative meetings – face to face meetings with representative groups
  • Stakeholder meetings – face to face meetings with stakeholders
  • Smart Homes in Scandinavia – research commissioned to look at developments in Scandinavian countries
  • Consumer focus groups – held at “Orange at Home” in Hatfield
slide11

Orange At Home

Hatfield

Consumer Focus Groups

slide13

TOP 10

30 consumer questions

q 1 what is in it for me
Q.1 What is in it for me?
  • Consumers on the whole have very little knowledge about the potential of Smart Home technology.
  • They are generally open towards the concept but would like more information before they have it in their homes.
  • Suggested ways of getting the message across:
    • TV features, documentaries and ‘make-overs’
    • Newspaper features
    • Ideal Home exhibition
    • Information in High Street stores
q 3 how long will it last
Q.3 How long will it last?
  • The current generation of consumer products are often far from ‘durable’. Washing machines have a lifespan of 8 years, and mobile phones of around 18 months.
  • Consumers can feel frustrated if they buy something and within a matter of weeks or months the next version is available and is faster, sleeker, and cheaper.
  • Consumers are concerned about initial outlay and depreciation.
  • They need to know how long a device or system will last.
  • Maintenance and repair costs are also important.
q 4 what if i don t have it
Q.4 What if I don’t have it?
  • Will traditional devices and services be withdrawn?
  • Will new devices and services cost more than the old ones?
  • Will older ‘legacy’ systems continue to be maintained?
  • What are my options?
  • Non-technological choices should be available, particularly for independent living.
q 7 what happens if i move
Q.7 What happens if I move?
  • Can I take it with me?
  • If I leave it behind, what’s it worth?
  • What happens to my data when I move?
  • Can it be easily installed in a new home?
  • Can it be refurbished for another user?
  • What information is there for new users of old equipment?
q 8 how secure is it
Q.8 How secure is it?
  • Consumers are concerned about privacy and computer ‘hacking’.
  • Reassurance must be given that their data is private information that is kept secure within the system at all times and will not be given out except with their advance permission.
  • Systems must be secure against intrusion from people with malicious intent. Suitable security steps must be in place to prevent attack, infiltration and data theft.
q 10 is it safe
Q.10 Is it safe?
  • It is all to easy to conjure up comic images of robots taking over the home and systems going mad. However, consumers have serious concerns about the inherent safety of new devices.
  • All potential users of a device or service should be considered when it is designed. Any potential safety issues should be addressed in the design process and if they cannot be removed, then they must be highlighted in the users’ information.
q 11 what if it fails
Q.11 What if it fails?
  • What happens if some or all of it fails?
  • What happens to my data if it fails
  • Is it safe when it fails?
  • Safety is a key concern, especially for more vulnerable people who should not be left without help if a system fails or malfunctions.
  • Data backup processes may be necessary to prevent the loss of data from a system should it fail.
q 12 what will it cost
Q.12 What will it cost?
  • “Service bundling” may offer apparent cost savings and easy access to a range of services, but must be transparent.
  • New models of charging for traditional services may be accepted if consumers appreciate other benefits.
  • People need adequate information to enable them to calculate costs and compare market offerings.
  • The impact on home insurance costs should also be made clear.
q 13 can i switch supplier
Q.13 Can I switch supplier?
  • Interoperability and compatibility of components, devices and systems are key attributes of many proposed Smart Home devices.
  • Consumers are concerned that they may be tied to one service provider if they choose a particular range of equipment that best suits their requirements.
  • Choice is not always an option with local authority provision, but public and private options should be available to all users.
q 18 snooping or privacy
Q.18 Snooping or privacy?
  • Some consumers like the concept that they could monitor their home on CCTV cameras via the Internet, mobile phone, or PDA.
  • CCTV might be acceptable to watch a baby in the nursery when you are downstairs eating dinner, but it might not be to watch the baby-sitter when you’re out at the pub.
  • There needs to be a balance struck between the rights of the user and those of anyone monitored by a system.
slide25

SmartHouse Code of Practice

10 work areas identified

researched

and written by 10 teams

slide26

SmartHouse Code of Practice

10 work areas identified

researched

and written by 10 teams

slide27

SmartHouse Code of Practice

10 work areas identified

researched

and written by 10 teams

The “Consumer Requirements” section

Contributed by ANEC with input from Intertek RPT and European consumer organisations

slide28

Why it is Important to involve Consumers

  • Consumers are major stakeholders in smart houses, they must not be under-represented at the industrial and political levels.
  • Financially attractive solutions must be found to encourage consumers to adopt Smart House technology and services.
  • For the consumer a smart house can bring increased comfort, convenience, security and energy savings.
  • Smart Houses can be of particular benefit to the disabled and to the elderly.
  • Smart Houses are not “another hi-tech gadget”, they will bring significant social changes.
  • If Smart House technology is to be beneficial to the consumer, standards must ensure ease of installation, operation, safety, privacy and security.
slide29

Why it is Important to involve Consumers

  • Consumers are major stakeholders in smart houses, they must not be under-represented at the industrial and political levels.
  • Financially attractive solutions must be found to encourage consumers to adopt Smart House technology and services.
  • For the consumer a smart house can bring increased comfort, convenience, security and energy savings.
  • Smart Houses can be of particular benefit to the disabled and to the elderly.
  • Smart Houses are not “another hi-tech gadget”, they will bring significant social changes.
  • If Smart House technology is to be beneficial to the consumer, standards must ensure ease of installation, operation, safety, privacy and security.
slide30

Why it is Important to involve Consumers

  • Consumers are major stakeholders in smart houses, they must not be under-represented at the industrial and political levels.
  • Financially attractive solutions must be found to encourage consumers to adopt Smart House technology and services.
  • For the consumer a smart house can bring increased comfort, convenience, security and energy savings.
  • Smart Houses can be of particular benefit to the disabled and to the elderly.
  • Smart Houses are not “another hi-tech gadget”, they will bring significant social changes.
  • If Smart House technology is to be beneficial to the consumer, standards must ensure ease of installation, operation, safety, privacy and security.
slide31

Why it is Important to involve Consumers

  • Consumers are major stakeholders in smart houses, they must not be under-represented at the industrial and political levels.
  • Financially attractive solutions must be found to encourage consumers to adopt Smart House technology and services.
  • For the consumer a smart house can bring increased comfort, convenience, security and energy savings.
  • Smart Houses can be of particular benefit to the disabled and to the elderly.
  • Smart Houses are not “another hi-tech gadget”, they will bring significant social changes.
  • If Smart House technology is to be beneficial to the consumer, standards must ensure ease of installation, operation, safety, privacy and security.
slide32

Why it is Important to involve Consumers

  • Consumers are major stakeholders in smart houses, they must not be under-represented at the industrial and political levels.
  • Financially attractive solutions must be found to encourage consumers to adopt Smart House technology and services.
  • For the consumer a smart house can bring increased comfort, convenience, security and energy savings.
  • Smart Houses can be of particular benefit to the disabled and to the elderly.
  • Smart Houses are not “another hi-tech gadget”, they will bring significant social changes.
  • If Smart House technology is to be beneficial to the consumer, standards must ensure ease of installation, operation, safety, privacy and security.
slide33

Why it is Important to involve Consumers

  • Consumers are major stakeholders in smart houses, they must not be under-represented at the industrial and political levels.
  • Financially attractive solutions must be found to encourage consumers to adopt Smart House technology and services.
  • For the consumer a smart house can bring increased comfort, convenience, security and energy savings.
  • Smart Houses can be of particular benefit to the disabled and to the elderly.
  • Smart Houses are not “another hi-tech gadget”, they will bring significant social changes.
  • If Smart House technology is to be beneficial to the consumer, standards must ensure ease of installation, operation, safety, privacy and security.
slide34

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide35

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide36

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide37

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide38

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide39

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide40

User Issues

Cost benefits

Design Considerations 1

Comfort and convenience

User interfaces

Easy to understand

and to use

Personalisation

Design for all

slide41

Technical Issues

Reliability and

quality of service

Design Considerations 2

Energy consumption

Access

Interoperability

slide42

Technical Issues

Reliability and

quality of service

Design Considerations 2

Energy consumption

Access

Interoperability

slide43

Technical Issues

Reliability and

quality of service

Design Considerations 2

Energy consumption

Access

Interoperability

slide44

Technical Issues

Reliability and

quality of service

Design Considerations 2

Energy consumption

Access

Interoperability

slide45

Technical Issues

Reliability and

quality of service

Design Considerations 2

Energy consumption

Access

Interoperability

slide46

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

slide47

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

slide48

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

slide49

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

slide50

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

slide51

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

slide52

Social Issues

Compatibility with

essential services

Design Considerations 3

Info-tainment

Health

Security

Privacy

Safety

contact
Contact:

Address:

Intertek ETL Semko

Research & Performance Testing

Davy Avenue

Knowlhill

Milton Keynes

MK5 8NL

Phone:

01908 857744

Email:

[email protected] (Technical & Testing)

nicola.king @intertek.com (Research)

[email protected] (Safety)

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