Qualifications at level 5 of the eqf
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Qualifications at level 5 of the EQF. Panteia and 3s Cedefop study Amsterdam 13 February 2014 Simon Broek. Overview presentation. Part A: Introduction, aim, research questions Part B: Importance, roles and functions Part C: Learning outcomes and structure of programmes

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Qualifications at level 5 of the eqf

Qualifications at level 5 of the EQF

Panteiaand 3s

Cedefopstudy

Amsterdam 13 February 2014

Simon Broek


Overview presentation

Overview presentation

  • Part A: Introduction, aim, research questions

  • Part B: Importance, roles and functions

  • Part C: Learning outcomes and structure of programmes

  • Part D: recommendations


Part a introduction aim research questions

Part A: Introduction, aim, research questions


Introduction level 5 zone of overlap

Introduction: Level 5: zone of overlap

  • Traditionally, education and training systems have separate and distinct sub-systems (general, vocational and academic/higher education) and these sub-systems are usually related to one another in a strict hierarchy of primary, secondary and tertiary education

  • it appears that VET and HE systems are approaching each other: “It becomes increasingly obvious that the borderlines between VET and HE are partially blurring” (Dunkel and Le Mouillour, 2009).

  • Emphasis on permeability, access, progression

  • What role does Level 5 play in this?


Aim of the study

Aim of the study

  • a better understanding of the roles and functions of qualifications referred to EQF level 5, for further learning as well as for employment.

  • strengthen the understanding of the way in which the learning outcomes approach is applied in qualifications frameworks across Europe – using level 5 as a reference point.


Conceptual framework

Conceptual framework


Conceptual framework1

Conceptual framework


Research questions

Research questions


Methodology

Methodology

  • Country analysis in fifteen countries

  • In-depth analysis of six case studies

  • Analysis based on:

  • desk research,

  • interviews /site visits with umbrella organisations, Ministries, providers, employers, employees/ graduates, students


Structure report

Structure report

  • 1. Aim of the study, conceptual framework and research questions

  • 2.Inventory of EQF level 5 qualification types

  • 3. Qualifications at level 5 help people progress in their career and to higher education

  • 4. EQF level 5 qualifications: profile in terms of learning outcomes and input variables

  • 5. Assigning qualifications to the EQF level 5

  • 6. Using NQFs for improving linkages between sub-systems, learning contexts and qualifications and for developing new qualifications: EQF level 5 as a reference point

  • 7. Learning-outcomes based qualifications levels: implications for individuals in terms of access, progression and transfer of learning outcomes – EQF level 5 as reference point

  • 8. Conclusions and recommendations

  • Country reports / Case study reports


Qualifications at level 5 of the eqf

DemarcationThe fifteen countries which are included in this study are those countries that presented their EQF referencing reports to the EQF Advisory Group by June 2012. They are:

  • Austria,

  • Belgium (Flanders),

  • Croatia,

  • Czech Republic,

  • Denmark,

  • Estonia,

  • France,

  • Ireland,

  • Latvia,

  • Lithuania,

  • Luxembourg,

  • Malta,

  • the Netherlands,

  • Portugal,

  • United Kingdom (England and Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales).


Different types of eqf level 5 qualifications

Different types of EQF level 5 qualifications


Demarcation

Demarcation

In-depth analysis in 6 countries: Austria, Czech Republic, France, Ireland, Lithuania, the Netherlands.


Part b importance roles and functions

Part B: Importance, roles and functions


Diversity in systems context and countries

Diversity in systems, context and countries

Subsystems in which level 5 is offered

  • HE/SCHE

  • IVET

  • General education

  • Professional qualifications (CVET)

    Difference learning contexts:

  • Formal learning:

  • Non-formal learning:

  • Informal learning:

    Distinction between formalised systems and non-formalised systems; i.e. the systems which are state-regulated and systems which are not.

    Country differences:

  • Countries with only qualifications from outside the formal system linked to EQF level 5

  • Countries with only one type of qualification (VET or HE) linked to level 5

  • Countries having more than one type of qualification linked to EQF level 5

  • Countries providing a diversified landscape


The importance of eqf level 5 qualification types

The importance of EQF level 5 qualification types

On the basis of this qualitative assessment the following clusters of countries are identified:

  • a)Countries in which EQF level 5 qualifications play an important role: FR and AT.

  • b) Countries where EQF level 5 qualifications have an average importance: UK, LU, IE, EE, DK

  • c) Countries where EQF level 5 qualifications have some importance: LV and BE (fl)

  • d) Countries where EQF level 5 qualifications have little importance: PT, NL, HR, CZ

    In Lithuania, there are no qualifications linked to EQF level 5.


Qualification types importance and sub systems

Qualification types, importance and sub systems

  • Q: number of qualification types

  • I: Importance; 1: non existent, 2: little importance, 3: some importance, 4: average importance, 5: important (O; no data)


Role and function

Role and function

  • There are qualification types that are primarily oriented towards the labour market

  • There are qualification types that are primarily oriented to access in HE

  • There are qualifications having a clear hybrid character


Qualifications at level 5 of the eqf

Routes related to EQF level 5 qualifications


Routes related to level 5 education progression route a b c

Routes related to level 5: education progression route (A-B-C)

With regards to the education progression route, illustrative examples can be found in the UK and France.

  • In the UK (Sco), the ‘Scottish Baccalaureate’ is primarily seen as a preparatory qualification for HE.

  • In France, in spite of its labour market focus, the University Diploma in Technology ‘Management of Enterprises and Administrations’ (DUT-GEA) has the advantage of providing its holders with the opportunity to continue their further formal learning through different higher education pathways. On average 80 per cent of the graduates continue their studies.


Routes related to level 5 the education route preparing for employment at eqf level 5 a b f

Routes related to level 5: The education route preparing for employment at EQF level 5 (A-B-F)

  • With regards to the education route preparing for employment at EQF level 5, almost all level 5 qualifications can be mentioned as an example


Routes related to level 5 employment route

Routes related to level 5: employment route

  • The occupation promotion (vertical labour mobility) route via accreditation of prior experiences (G-I-F);

  • The horizontal career switch route on the basis of accreditation of prior experiences (D-E-F and D’-E’-F ), i.e. while continuing working at the same level (or working on a higher level) obtaining a qualification on the basis of accreditation of prior experiences;

    Qualifications can be used to increase the level of operation in current occupation (promotion) via accreditation of prior experiences. An example of where the EQF level qualification is used for this purpose is in Estonia. The Occupational Qualification in Estonia confirms occupational competence and/or licence to practise. The qualification is obtained via work-based learning.


Routes related to level 5 mixed route

Routes related to level 5: mixed route

  • The horizontal career switch route on the basis of an education programme (D-K-B-F), (D’-J-B-F (higher)), and (G-H-B-F (lower)), i.e. while continuing operating at the same level (or higher/lower level) obtaining a qualification on the basis of an education programme.

  • For instance, in the Netherlands, since there is a large coherence in both the content and in-depthness of the ‘Associate Degree’ and the related professional Bachelor, making the transition from the first to the latter appears easy.


Qualifications at level 5 play an increasingly important role

Qualifications at level 5 play an increasingly important role

Level 5 qualifications types play an important role for a number of reasons.

  • In many countries they firstly play a role in allowing easier, step-by-step transitions from VET to higher education without loosing a labour market focus.

  • Secondly, related to the first reason, the level 5 type qualifications are particularly relevant for people already in employment as they often are more labour market oriented than Bachelor programmes, however, allow for progression in ones career.

  • Thirdly, the level 5 type qualifications are or are becoming more recognised as being of labour market relevance.


Part c learning outcomes and structure of programmes

Part C: Learning outcomes and structure of programmes


Learning outcomes descriptions

Learning outcomes descriptions

  • The learning outcomes are very differently described for the specific qualifications studied.

    • First of all, there is a difference in the scope what is described; either full qualifications or separate units/modules of qualifications.

    • Secondly, the concepts and terminology used differs across qualifications and national contexts.

  • Descriptions are developed on the basis of a professional /occupational profile.

  • No noticeable differences were found between VET and HE systems descriptions


Input variables

Input variables

  • The way the study intensity/volume or duration of the course leading to the level 5 qualification is expressed is largely dependent on the sub-system the qualification is related to.

    • ECTS points

    • Hours

    • Years/months

  • The mode of delivery can be school-based, work-based and dual (combination of both). In addition a distinction can be made between full-time and part-time education programmes. The mode of delivery depends on the sub-system the qualification belongs to:

    • Predominantly, the HE governed qualifications are ‘school-based’ including a considerable work-based part.

    • For the VET governed qualifications at the EQF level 5, the focus is more on gaining practical experience while learning.

    • professional qualifications, often procedures for validation of prior experience

    • general education systems are generally school-based

  • qualifications in the formal HE sub-system are often more uniformly described in terms of mode of delivery and volume of the programme.

  • When relating the learning outcome descriptions and the mode of delivery, it can be observed that when there is more emphasis on generic, transversal competences, the mode of delivery tends to be more school-based. On the other hand, focus on technical/occupational skills translates into a more work-based mode of delivery.


Part d recommendations

Part D: Recommendations


Recommendations

Recommendations

  • (A) It is recommended to stimulate a diversification of qualifications at EQF level 5 in the countries.

  • (B) It is recommended to clarify that qualifications frameworks concern qualifications and not education and training programmes.

  • (C) It is recommended to further stimulate the use of the learning outcomes approach for describing individual qualifications and assigning them to NQF levels on the basis of these descriptions.

  • (D) It is recommended to devote specific studies on qualifications with similar titles now linked to different EQF levels.

  • (E) It is recommended to improve transparency of procedures for assigning qualifications to NQF levels; this for qualifications obtained in formal, non-formal and informal learning contexts.

  • (F) It is recommended to look at the issue of level 5 qualification, key purpose, linkages, progression again after some years as a proxy for the implementation of the EQF in general.


Thank you for your attention

Thank you for your attention

Report will be available soon at the Cedefop website:

http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/EN/Index.aspx

nl.linkedin.com/in/simonbroek/

www.ockham-ips.nl


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