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Providing Professional Support for Reading First Classroom Teachers: Who, What, When, Where, How, and Why? Michael C. McKenna Georgia Southern University. Today’s Goals. View PD as part of a comprehensive plan for your school Describe major approaches to PD

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Providing Professional Support for Reading First Classroom Teachers:

Who, What, When, Where, How, and Why?

Michael C. McKenna

Georgia Southern University


Today’s Goals

  • View PD as part of a comprehensive plan for your school

  • Describe major approaches to PD

  • Discuss how to plan and evaluate PD

  • Apply these ideas to your setting


Continuum of PD

Comprehensive plan

aimed at increasing student achievement

Training in

specific skills

or programs

NarrowBroad


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


A comprehensive PD plan

  • Includes cycles of theory, demonstration,

    practice, and feedback

  • Demands collaboration between teachers

    and administrators

  • Must be specific to programs in use

  • Avoids conflicting messages

  • Accounts for the school context

  • Ensures that practice is changed

  • Ensures lasting change in practice by

    demonstrating links to achievement


Seagull

Approach


Individually

Guided

Inquiry

Observation

And

Feedback

Professional

Development

Models

Training

Curriculum

Development/

Improvement


Individually

Guided

Inquiry

Observation

And

Feedback

Professional

Development

Models

Training

Curriculum

Development/

Improvement


Individually

Guided

Inquiry

Observation

And

Feedback

Professional

Development

Models

Training

Curriculum

Development/

Improvement


Individually

Guided

Inquiry

Observation

And

Feedback

Professional

Development

Models

Training

Curriculum

Development/

Improvement


Individually

Guided

Inquiry

Observation

And

Feedback

Professional

Development

Models

Training

Curriculum

Development/

Improvement


Individually

Guided

Inquiry

Observation

And

Feedback

Professional

Development

Models

Training

Curriculum

Development/

Improvement


What are the main avenues of PD in Reading First?


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


1. Knowledge-Building Sessions

  • Delivered by a variety of educators, including outsiders

  • Topics should begin with “nuts and bolts”

  • Topics should become increasingly focused

  • Should be based on assessed needs of teachers

  • Should be assessed beyond the level of perceptions

  • Must be followed up to encourage implementation


How can we plan to deliver a good knowledge-building session?


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Content

  • Session content was coherent and clearly organized

  • Goals of the session were clearly stated

  • Information was conveyed in practical terms

  • Examples were appropriate and helped clarify new ideas

  • Participants exhibited evidence of understanding

  • Adequate closure was provided


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Actual Text of Gettysburg Address

A duck walks into a bar. Bartender says, “Hey, your pants are down!”

[Wait for laughter]

Fourscore and seven years ago, . . .

– Gary Larson, The Far Side


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Process

  • Presenter monitored participant understanding

  • Presenter adjusted instruction when necessary

  • Presenter responded to questions and comments insightfully and with tact

  • Presenter provided opportunities for role-playing or other forms of guided practice

  • Presenter built rapport and a positive climate

  • Pacing was appropriate

  • Suggestions were offered for classroom implementation

  • Commitment to implement and specific ideas for doing so were sought from participants

  • Participants evaluated the session in written form


Context

  • Physical facilities were appropriate

  • Materials needed were organized in advance

  • Session began on time

  • Participants were reminded of future dates and other “housekeeping” items


Context

  • Physical facilities were appropriate

  • Materials needed were organized in advance

  • Session began on time

  • Participants were reminded of future dates and other “housekeeping” items


Context

  • Physical facilities were appropriate

  • Materials needed were organized in advance

  • Session began on time

  • Participants were reminded of future dates and other “housekeeping” items


Context

  • Physical facilities were appropriate

  • Materials needed were organized in advance

  • Session began on time

  • Participants were reminded of future dates and other “housekeeping” items


Context

  • Physical facilities were appropriate

  • Materials needed were organized in advance

  • Session began on time

  • Participants were reminded of future dates and other “housekeeping” items


When should knowledge-building sessions be scheduled?


2. Data-Based Presentations

  • Usually presented by LC with administrative support

  • Could focus on the grade level or the school

  • Should be followed by classroom analysis with teachers


2. Data-Based Presentations

  • Usually presented by LC with administrative support

  • Could focus on the grade level or the school

  • Should be followed by classroom analysis with teachers


2. Data-Based Presentations

  • Usually presented by LC with administrative support

  • Could focus on the grade level or the school

  • Should be followed by classroom analysis with teachers


2. Data-Based Presentations

  • Usually presented by LC with administrative support

  • Could focus on the grade level or the school

  • Should be followed by classroom analysis with teachers


When should data-based sessions be scheduled?


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


3. Book Clubs and Study Groups

  • Teachers must prepare in advance

  • Collaboration builds community in a nonthreatening way

  • Group sessions imply that every educator is a learner

  • Selections should be based on choice and need

  • Selections may vary with grade level

  • The LC should play a key role in locating resources


When should study groups be scheduled?


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


4. Observation and Feedback

  • Must be formative, not evaluative

  • Require building a climate of trust by the LC

  • Note taking may involve time spent on activities

  • Note taking may involve domains (expected vs. observed)

  • Note taking should ground conferences

  • Feedback should be quick and specific

  • Feedback can be written or oral

  • Feedback should include positive but sincere comments

  • Conferences should end with an offer made by the LC


When should observations and conferences be scheduled?


5. Modeling

  • The LC may model both outside and inside the classroom

  • Classroom modeling amounts to a role-reversal

  • Modeling is more effective with follow-up conferencing


5. Modeling

  • The LC may model both outside and inside the classroom

  • Classroom modeling amounts to a role-reversal

  • Modeling is more effective with follow-up conferencing


5. Modeling

  • The LC may model both outside and inside the classroom

  • Classroom modeling amounts to a role-reversal

  • Modeling is more effective with follow-up conferencing


5. Modeling

  • The LC may model both outside and inside the classroom

  • Classroom modeling amounts to a role-reversal

  • Modeling is more effective with follow-up conferencing


When should modeling occur?


Is modeling really effective?


What PD activities might be appropriate for these educators in your setting?


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