adjunct prof warwick middleton mb bs, franzcp, md two day seminars, the delphi centre  cannan institute: sydney 4-5th ma

adjunct prof warwick middleton mb bs, franzcp, md two day seminars, the delphi centre cannan institute: sydney 4-5th ma PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 319 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

OBJECTIVES. To explore the nature of mankind in terms of what he/she is rather than in terms what we'd like to believeTo present a contemporary view on the recognition, assessment and treatment of severely developmentally traumatized individuals that is informed by history, the reality and prevalence of abuse and neglect in current society, and the nature of selfhood and its boundariesTo explore the nature of our evolving perspectives on trauma and how dissociation and models of psychosis have9459

Download Presentation

adjunct prof warwick middleton mb bs, franzcp, md two day seminars, the delphi centre cannan institute: sydney 4-5th ma

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. ADJUNCT PROF WARWICK MIDDLETON MB BS, FRANZCP, MD TWO DAY SEMINARS, THE DELPHI CENTRE & CANNAN INSTITUTE: SYDNEY 4-5th MAY, BRISBANE 18-19th MAY 2007

2. To explore the nature of mankind in terms of what he/she is rather than in terms what we’d like to believe To understand the nature of our evolving perspectives on trauma and how dissociation and models of psychosis have been central issues from the very beginning as religious constructs began to be supplanted by medical/scientific models To construct a perspective on the neurosis-psychosis continuum and psychiatric paradigms that incorporates an understanding of psychological trauma and the complex adaptations to it including how it is remembered To present a contemporary view on the recognition, assessment and informed treatment of severely developmentally traumatized individuals that is informed by history, the reality and prevalence of abuse and neglect in current society, and the nature of selfhood and its boundariesTo explore the nature of mankind in terms of what he/she is rather than in terms what we’d like to believe To understand the nature of our evolving perspectives on trauma and how dissociation and models of psychosis have been central issues from the very beginning as religious constructs began to be supplanted by medical/scientific models To construct a perspective on the neurosis-psychosis continuum and psychiatric paradigms that incorporates an understanding of psychological trauma and the complex adaptations to it including how it is remembered To present a contemporary view on the recognition, assessment and informed treatment of severely developmentally traumatized individuals that is informed by history, the reality and prevalence of abuse and neglect in current society, and the nature of selfhood and its boundaries

26. COMPONENTS OF WELL-DEVELOPED SELFHOOD (2) Having and maintaining self-esteem Express and respond to a full range of feeling An appropriate sense of entitlement Ownership of one’s own actions and utterances Having, and expressing, creativity Ability to empathize Remaining grounded in current reality

27. COMPONENTS OF WELL-DEVELOPED SELFHOOD (3) Tolerating the pain of growing A capacity for differentiated, autonomous identity and function A stably evolving sense of identity Being at peace with one’s own body Possessing self-sustaining ego-defense mechanisms Being comfortable alone and in company

28. COMPONENTS OF WELL-DEVELOPED SELFHOOD (4) Not vulnerable to reactivation of latent traumatically formed self concepts Ability to differentiate from mob dynamics Foundations tethered to positive introjects Not subject to “black hole” experiences Stable personal existence across contexts/experiences/affects Ability to differentiate from the beliefs of others

59. “In one of his last professional acts before his death in 1955, Albert Einstein wrote a short but glowing foreword to a book by a geologist named Charles Hapgood entitled “Earth’s Shifting Crust: A Key to Some Basic Problems of Earth science”. Hapgood’s book was a steady demolition of the idea that continents were in motion. In a tone that all but invited the reader to join in a tolerant chuckle, Hapgood observed that a few gullible souls had noticed ‘an apparent correspondence in shape between certain continents’. It would appear, he went on, ‘that South America might be fitted together with Africa and so on... it is even claimed that rock formations on opposite sides of the Atlantic match.’ Bill Bryson 2003“In one of his last professional acts before his death in 1955, Albert Einstein wrote a short but glowing foreword to a book by a geologist named Charles Hapgood entitled “Earth’s Shifting Crust: A Key to Some Basic Problems of Earth science”. Hapgood’s book was a steady demolition of the idea that continents were in motion. In a tone that all but invited the reader to join in a tolerant chuckle, Hapgood observed that a few gullible souls had noticed ‘an apparent correspondence in shape between certain continents’. It would appear, he went on, ‘that South America might be fitted together with Africa and so on... it is even claimed that rock formations on opposite sides of the Atlantic match.’ Bill Bryson 2003

60. “At the moment of the attack, the patient was in the grip of a delirium that related to the events that presumably gave shape to the initial crises: she addressed imaginary persons with furious invective: ‘Criminals!, Thieves!, Burn them!, Burn them! Oh, the dogs! They’re biting me!’ So many memories doubtless, of emotions of her youth.”“At the moment of the attack, the patient was in the grip of a delirium that related to the events that presumably gave shape to the initial crises: she addressed imaginary persons with furious invective: ‘Criminals!, Thieves!, Burn them!, Burn them! Oh, the dogs! They’re biting me!’ So many memories doubtless, of emotions of her youth.”

61. “In a few cases the ‘other’ personality is marked by different speech and voice.... Thus we have here two different personalities operating side by side, each one fully attentive. However, they are probably never completely separated from each other since one may communicate with both (pg 147).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911“In a few cases the ‘other’ personality is marked by different speech and voice.... Thus we have here two different personalities operating side by side, each one fully attentive. However, they are probably never completely separated from each other since one may communicate with both (pg 147).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911

62. “As the result of the splitting-off of independent operating complexes, the patient often feels as if another second self existed within himself. When the patient is ignorant of or instinctively rejects the pathological nature of such experiences, he is compelled to conclude that he is ‘possessed’ or hypnotically influenced or some such thing (pg 384).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911“As the result of the splitting-off of independent operating complexes, the patient often feels as if another second self existed within himself. When the patient is ignorant of or instinctively rejects the pathological nature of such experiences, he is compelled to conclude that he is ‘possessed’ or hypnotically influenced or some such thing (pg 384).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911

63. “Such terms as acute paranoia, acute hallucinatory insanity, confusion mentale, as well as mania and melancholia... do not designate ‘diseases’... Not only the names but the entire concepts were arbitrarily constructed by this or that observer, depending on which symptom he considered the most striking one... It would take me far too long if I were to say about these notions... A symptom, regardless of whether it is a symptom-complex (272-3).” “The pathology of schizophrenia gives us no indication as to where we should look for the causes of the disease. Direct investigation for specific cause or factors has also left us stranded (337).” “We do not know what the schizophrenic process actually is (pg 466).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911“Such terms as acute paranoia, acute hallucinatory insanity, confusion mentale, as well as mania and melancholia... do not designate ‘diseases’... Not only the names but the entire concepts were arbitrarily constructed by this or that observer, depending on which symptom he considered the most striking one... It would take me far too long if I were to say about these notions... A symptom, regardless of whether it is a symptom-complex (272-3).” “The pathology of schizophrenia gives us no indication as to where we should look for the causes of the disease. Direct investigation for specific cause or factors has also left us stranded (337).” “We do not know what the schizophrenic process actually is (pg 466).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911

64. “I have never had any reason for making a diagnosis of ‘hysterical psychosis’. All cases so diagnosed by others differed in no wise from other schizophrnics. when a supposed hysteric becomes psychotic or deterirates, he is in my experience not a hysteric at all but a schizophrenic.” Eugen Bleuler, 1911 - pg 289“I have never had any reason for making a diagnosis of ‘hysterical psychosis’. All cases so diagnosed by others differed in no wise from other schizophrnics. when a supposed hysteric becomes psychotic or deterirates, he is in my experience not a hysteric at all but a schizophrenic.” Eugen Bleuler, 1911 - pg 289

65. “We are justified in regarding the majority at least of the clinical pictures which are brought together here as the expression of a single morbid process though outwardly they often diverge very far from one another (pg3).” “The undoubted inadequacy of my former classification has led me once more to undertake the attempt to make a more natural grouping... recovered cases were not taken into account because of the uncertainty which still exists, but only such cases as had led to profound dementia (pg 89-90).”“We are justified in regarding the majority at least of the clinical pictures which are brought together here as the expression of a single morbid process though outwardly they often diverge very far from one another (pg3).” “The undoubted inadequacy of my former classification has led me once more to undertake the attempt to make a more natural grouping... recovered cases were not taken into account because of the uncertainty which still exists, but only such cases as had led to profound dementia (pg 89-90).”

66. “I call dementia praecox ‘schizophrenia’ because (as I hope to demonstrate) the ‘splitting’ of different psychic functions is one of its most important characteristics. For the sake of convenience, I use the word in the singular although it is apparent that the group includes several diseases (pg 8).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911“I call dementia praecox ‘schizophrenia’ because (as I hope to demonstrate) the ‘splitting’ of different psychic functions is one of its most important characteristics. For the sake of convenience, I use the word in the singular although it is apparent that the group includes several diseases (pg 8).” Eugen Bleuler, 1911

99. “In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the pendulum began to swing in the opposite direction. Although there were many successful treatments of adults who had survived various kinds of childhood abuse, the treatment of those with particularly severe childhood traumatization proved far from simple. Aggressive attempts to help some severely traumatized patients explore and abreact their childhood abuse resulted in profound regression and lengthy, intensive, and expensive treatment. It slowly became clear that there were pitfalls in a simplistic focus on the childhood traumatic events.”“In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the pendulum began to swing in the opposite direction. Although there were many successful treatments of adults who had survived various kinds of childhood abuse, the treatment of those with particularly severe childhood traumatization proved far from simple. Aggressive attempts to help some severely traumatized patients explore and abreact their childhood abuse resulted in profound regression and lengthy, intensive, and expensive treatment. It slowly became clear that there were pitfalls in a simplistic focus on the childhood traumatic events.”

100. “It is clear to me that prescriptive, step-by-step approaches actually cause more problems than they solve, as therapists struggle to assimilate concrete dictates into their personal models of how to conduct therapy with a given person. I elucidate principles and goals, and leave therapists to determine how these are best achieved for a given situation.” Frank W. Putnam, MD 1997“It is clear to me that prescriptive, step-by-step approaches actually cause more problems than they solve, as therapists struggle to assimilate concrete dictates into their personal models of how to conduct therapy with a given person. I elucidate principles and goals, and leave therapists to determine how these are best achieved for a given situation.” Frank W. Putnam, MD 1997

113. “False memories are by no means rare occurrences in most of us... Most people, probably, are in doubt about certain matters ascribed to their past. They may have seen them, may have said them, done them, or they may only have dreamed or imagined they did so... The most frequent source of false memory is the accounts we give to others of our experiences. Such accounts we almost always make both more simple and more interesting than the truth. We quote what we should have said or done rather than what we really said or did; and in the first telling we may be fully aware of the distinction. But ere long the fiction expels the reality from memory and reigns in its stead alone. This is one great source of the fallibility of testimony meant to be quite honest... It is next to impossible to get a story of this so accurate in all its details, although it is the inessential details that suffer most change.” William James, 1890“False memories are by no means rare occurrences in most of us... Most people, probably, are in doubt about certain matters ascribed to their past. They may have seen them, may have said them, done them, or they may only have dreamed or imagined they did so... The most frequent source of false memory is the accounts we give to others of our experiences. Such accounts we almost always make both more simple and more interesting than the truth. We quote what we should have said or done rather than what we really said or did; and in the first telling we may be fully aware of the distinction. But ere long the fiction expels the reality from memory and reigns in its stead alone. This is one great source of the fallibility of testimony meant to be quite honest... It is next to impossible to get a story of this so accurate in all its details, although it is the inessential details that suffer most change.” William James, 1890

114. “In one instance, the brother... of his own accord... confirmed for me ...[sexual abuse] scenes of this kind from their later childhood and the fact of sexual relations dating further back. Another time it happened that two women whom I was treating had as children had sexual intercourse with the same man, when certain scenes had occurred in which all three took part. A particular symptom which could be traced to these childish experiences had been developed in both cases and bore witness to this common experience.” SIGMUND FREUD, 1896“In one instance, the brother... of his own accord... confirmed for me ...[sexual abuse] scenes of this kind from their later childhood and the fact of sexual relations dating further back. Another time it happened that two women whom I was treating had as children had sexual intercourse with the same man, when certain scenes had occurred in which all three took part. A particular symptom which could be traced to these childish experiences had been developed in both cases and bore witness to this common experience.” SIGMUND FREUD, 1896

115. “In many cases, however, in which the obliteration is due to mental shock or other physical factor, the experience which is inaccessible to the consciousness of the subject under the usual conditions of memory has been recovered in the hypnotic state or by the method of free association or has expressed itself, usually in a distorted form, in dreams. In some cases soldiers have lost the entire memory of their lives from some moment preceding a shock or severe strain until they have found themselves in hospital, perhaps weeks later, although during at least part of the intervening time they may have been to all appearances fully conscious and may even have distinguished themselves by actions on the field of which they have no recollection. Although these memories may remain for months or years quite inaccessible to memory when approached by ordinary channels, they may be brought to the surface by means of hypnotism or by the method of free association.” W.H.R.Rivers,1920“In many cases, however, in which the obliteration is due to mental shock or other physical factor, the experience which is inaccessible to the consciousness of the subject under the usual conditions of memory has been recovered in the hypnotic state or by the method of free association or has expressed itself, usually in a distorted form, in dreams. In some cases soldiers have lost the entire memory of their lives from some moment preceding a shock or severe strain until they have found themselves in hospital, perhaps weeks later, although during at least part of the intervening time they may have been to all appearances fully conscious and may even have distinguished themselves by actions on the field of which they have no recollection. Although these memories may remain for months or years quite inaccessible to memory when approached by ordinary channels, they may be brought to the surface by means of hypnotism or by the method of free association.” W.H.R.Rivers,1920

117. “Marilyn’s day child was her dominant more fully realized half. Her split had not only caused her memories of incest to disappear until she was twenty-four but had also made it impossible for her to remember how she had managed to divide herself in the first place. She writes... that she doesn’t know how she forgot. But her split must have sequestered a number of her episodic memories and made them well-nigh impossible to retrieve.”“Marilyn’s day child was her dominant more fully realized half. Her split had not only caused her memories of incest to disappear until she was twenty-four but had also made it impossible for her to remember how she had managed to divide herself in the first place. She writes... that she doesn’t know how she forgot. But her split must have sequestered a number of her episodic memories and made them well-nigh impossible to retrieve.”

118. “I am considered an authority on the malleability of memory. I’ve testified in hundreds of court cases where a person’s fate depended on whether the jury believed the eyewitness’s sworn testimony and pointing finger of blame: ‘He’s the one.’ ‘I saw him.’ “He did it.” I take the witness stand and speak my academic truths, cautioning the court that our memories are flexible and superimposable, a panoramic blackboard with an endless supply of chalk and erasers.” Elizabeth Loftus, 1994“I am considered an authority on the malleability of memory. I’ve testified in hundreds of court cases where a person’s fate depended on whether the jury believed the eyewitness’s sworn testimony and pointing finger of blame: ‘He’s the one.’ ‘I saw him.’ “He did it.” I take the witness stand and speak my academic truths, cautioning the court that our memories are flexible and superimposable, a panoramic blackboard with an endless supply of chalk and erasers.” Elizabeth Loftus, 1994

119. “The options for those taking sides in this debate are unambiguous: the mind either has the ability to repress vast numbers of events, as described by recovered memory therapists, or it does not. the satanic cults, which have been reported by a substantial percentage of recovered memory patients and their therapists, either exist or have been crated in therapy.... the therapy setting and the special techniques used either access life histories previously unknown to the patients, or these procedures create pseudomemories. Because of the clear nature of these positions, this professional debate is not likely to be settled amicably or on some mutually agreed upon middle ground.” Richard Ofshe & Ethan watters, 1994“The options for those taking sides in this debate are unambiguous: the mind either has the ability to repress vast numbers of events, as described by recovered memory therapists, or it does not. the satanic cults, which have been reported by a substantial percentage of recovered memory patients and their therapists, either exist or have been crated in therapy.... the therapy setting and the special techniques used either access life histories previously unknown to the patients, or these procedures create pseudomemories. Because of the clear nature of these positions, this professional debate is not likely to be settled amicably or on some mutually agreed upon middle ground.” Richard Ofshe & Ethan watters, 1994

120. “The memories of Satanic ritual abuse survivors, if they are even partially real, pose a major challenge to our usual beliefs about humaqn history and the cultural evolution of our race. I have met dozens of people who claim to have participated in ritual cannibalism, drinking of human blood, and human and animal sacrifice, and who believe themselves to be demon-possessed.” Colin A. Ross, 1995 “From my perspective, the best example of the creation of clinically and legally significant pseudomemories involves allegations of satanic ritual abuse (SRA). Such allegations are defined here as claims that a vast, international, multigenerational conspiracy is practicing religious worship of Satan or the devil through rituals involving sex, death, torture, incest, human sacrifice, cannibalism, and necrophilia. With the exception of a few isolated ‘copycat’ incidents, there is no credible evidence that actual SRA is occurring or ever has occurred.” Frank W. Putnam, 1997“The memories of Satanic ritual abuse survivors, if they are even partially real, pose a major challenge to our usual beliefs about humaqn history and the cultural evolution of our race. I have met dozens of people who claim to have participated in ritual cannibalism, drinking of human blood, and human and animal sacrifice, and who believe themselves to be demon-possessed.” Colin A. Ross, 1995 “From my perspective, the best example of the creation of clinically and legally significant pseudomemories involves allegations of satanic ritual abuse (SRA). Such allegations are defined here as claims that a vast, international, multigenerational conspiracy is practicing religious worship of Satan or the devil through rituals involving sex, death, torture, incest, human sacrifice, cannibalism, and necrophilia. With the exception of a few isolated ‘copycat’ incidents, there is no credible evidence that actual SRA is occurring or ever has occurred.” Frank W. Putnam, 1997

121. “Critics who boldly tell others what is happening in therapists’ offices where they have never actually been are guilty of the same fallacy as those few therapists who regale training workshop audiences with gory details of satanic black masses that they have never seen. Both are telling others about something that they believe is going on; however, neither has ever seen it happen, and neither has any hard proof that it has ever happened.” Frank W. Putnam, MD 1997“Critics who boldly tell others what is happening in therapists’ offices where they have never actually been are guilty of the same fallacy as those few therapists who regale training workshop audiences with gory details of satanic black masses that they have never seen. Both are telling others about something that they believe is going on; however, neither has ever seen it happen, and neither has any hard proof that it has ever happened.” Frank W. Putnam, MD 1997

122. “The cruel paradox, with respect to the ‘false-memory’ debate, is that a person must have been severely traumatized to have the kinds of dissociative memory dysfunctions that increase susceptibility of acquisition of pseudo-memories.”“The cruel paradox, with respect to the ‘false-memory’ debate, is that a person must have been severely traumatized to have the kinds of dissociative memory dysfunctions that increase susceptibility of acquisition of pseudo-memories.”

123. “In August 1993, two years after my mother’s Jane doe article and a year and a half after the formation of the FMSF, I broke my public silence at a mental health continuing education conference in Ann Arbor, Michigan, presented my perspective on my family of origin and the formation of the FMSF. Having spoken my personal truth, and having addressed the issues necessary to meet my own standards of integrity and honesty, I have since returned my attention to the development of betrayal trauma theory. Yet hardly a day goes by that my work is not interrupted by challenges to my integrity or attempts to derail my work.” Professor Jennifer J. Freyd, 1996“In August 1993, two years after my mother’s Jane doe article and a year and a half after the formation of the FMSF, I broke my public silence at a mental health continuing education conference in Ann Arbor, Michigan, presented my perspective on my family of origin and the formation of the FMSF. Having spoken my personal truth, and having addressed the issues necessary to meet my own standards of integrity and honesty, I have since returned my attention to the development of betrayal trauma theory. Yet hardly a day goes by that my work is not interrupted by challenges to my integrity or attempts to derail my work.” Professor Jennifer J. Freyd, 1996

129. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other.The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other.

130. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other.The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which The fact that compared to even recent years much more is now reported on interpersonal trauma and abuse, as well as on dissociative and associated disorders is not that we are necessarily descending into an abyss, but rather that for the first time in human history there is a sufficient (if tenuous and hard-fought) willingness to know. At an individual level the dissociative patient finds some survival capacity in utilizing mechanisms drawn from the repertoire of mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other. mankind’s frequently invoked devices that allow it, or large sections of it, not to know things that are too confronting, too disturbing or which would necessitate the need for major (and unwelcome) changes in how we relate to the world and to each other.

131. There is a pervasive tendency for we humans to view ourselves in terms of how we’d like to see ourselves rather than in terms of how we really are. Life for much of history has been short and brutish and for many today still is. We are a particularly hierarchal primate where the currency of human interaction devolves so frequently to matters of power, sex, protection and the supply of food, and where much of our cognitive capacity is focussed on reading the intentions and utterances of fellow humans. Dissociation and the related mechanisms of creating alternative realities (fantasy proneness, extrasensory perception, adoption of trauma metaphors, fugue states, cycles of accusations and recanting, and hysterical psychosis) are evolved protective adaptations our species uses. The more we are forced to rely on them, the less whole, the less constant and the less grounded in current and past reality our sense of self is likely to be.There is a pervasive tendency for we humans to view ourselves in terms of how we’d like to see ourselves rather than in terms of how we really are. Life for much of history has been short and brutish and for many today still is. We are a particularly hierarchal primate where the currency of human interaction devolves so frequently to matters of power, sex, protection and the supply of food, and where much of our cognitive capacity is focussed on reading the intentions and utterances of fellow humans. Dissociation and the related mechanisms of creating alternative realities (fantasy proneness, extrasensory perception, adoption of trauma metaphors, fugue states, cycles of accusations and recanting, and hysterical psychosis) are evolved protective adaptations our species uses. The more we are forced to rely on them, the less whole, the less constant and the less grounded in current and past reality our sense of self is likely to be.

  • Login