Perspectives on Minnesota’s Health Industry Workforce
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 38

Perspectives on Minnesota’s Health Industry Workforce PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 63 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Perspectives on Minnesota’s Health Industry Workforce. Minnesota Rural Health Conference July 19, 2005 Duluth, MN. Jay Fonkert Office of Rural Health and Primary Care MN Department of Health.

Download Presentation

Perspectives on Minnesota’s Health Industry Workforce

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Perspectives on Minnesota’s Health Industry Workforce

Minnesota Rural Health Conference

July 19, 2005

Duluth, MN

Jay Fonkert

Office of Rural Health and Primary Care

MN Department of Health


Opinions expressed in this presentation are the sole responsibility of the author and do not represent opinions or positions of the Minnesota Department of Health or the State of Minnesota.


Workforce Analysis Program

Office of Rural Health and Primary Care

Annual surveys of licensed health professionals to better understand workforce demographics and disparities in health care access


Health care industry accounts for 11 percent of all private sector employee compensation in Minnesota.

Health Services

Other private nonfarm industries

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, regional accounts, 2003


Ambulatory Care employees receive more than half of all health care compensation in Minnesota.

Nursing and residential care facilities

Ambulatory Care

Hospitals

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, regional accounts, 2003


Some counties with high dependence of health care employment

Health care and social services employment as % of wage and salary employment

Olmsted (Rochester)37%

Wilkin (Breckenridge)25%

Chisago 22%

Grant21%

Mille Lacs20%

St. Louis (Duluth)20%

Statewide: 13%

Source: U. S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Regional accounts, 2002


Minnesota’s Healthcare Workforce

Estimated active at MN sites, 2004


Minnesota’s Healthcare Workforce

Estimated active at MN sites, 2004


Largest Minnesota health occupations

Source: Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, 2nd Quarter 2004.


Half of Minnesota health care workers work outside hospitals or physician offices.

Hospitals

All other sites

Physician and dentist offices

Nursing care facilities

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, 2002.


Male – Female Composition of Workforce

Physicians

Physician assistants

RNs

LPNs

RCPs

Physical therapists

Dentists

Dental assistants

Dental hygienists

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.


Dentists, physicians and RNs are older than other practitioners.

Median age of MN practitioners

Physicians

Physician assistants

RNs

Respiratory care practitioners

Physical therapists

Dentists

Dental assistants

Dental hygienists

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.


Age composition of workforce…

Physician assistants are significantly younger than physicians or RNs.

< 45 yr.

> 55 yr.

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.


The retirement crunch may be more serious for dentists than for physicians.

Dentists enter workforce at slightly younger age than physicians, but may stay in part-time practice a bit longer.

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.


Retirement is more imminent for dentists in the most rural areas.

DENTISTS BY AGE

< 45 yrs.

55+ yrs.


Rural practitioners tend to be a year or two older than urban practitioners.

Median age comparisons

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.


Dentists are more geographically dispersed than physicians.

Dentists

Dentists

Physicians

Physicians

Population: 41% rural

RNs26%

LPNs52%

RCPs19%

Physical therapists29%

Dental assistants34%

Dental hygienists33%

Physician assistants31%

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.


Specialist physicians are more concentrated in urban areas than primary care physicians.

Primary care physicians

Other specialties

Source: MDH, Office of Rural Health and Primary Care, 2004 survey data.

Urban = Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott and Washington counties, plus Rochester, St. Cloud and Duluth.


Per 100,000 Population (2000)

* Patient care physicians

Source: HRSA , State Health workforce Profiles.


Per 100,000 Population (2000)

* Patient care physicians

Source: HRSA , State Health workforce Profiles.


Minnesota Workforce Mix Ratios

2000 data, HRSA Health Workforce Profiles


Minnesota is…

  • AVERAGE in number of PHYSICIANS.

  • ABOVE AVERAGE in number of RNs and Dentists.

  • MUCH ABOVE AVERAGE in number of LPNs and Dental hygienists.


Minnesota has…

  • high ratio of RNs to physicians

  • high ratio of RNs to LPNs

What are the implications?

What changes can be expected?


Primary Work Sites of MN LPNS

MDH: ORHPC 2004 Licensing Survey


What kind of problem is it?

Workforce Supply?

Grow Workforce

Weak Market Demand?

Strengthen Markets

Weak Demand = Low Need


Hospitals and clinics, doctors and dentists…

Aren’t that much different from…

Other professionals or firms.

They set up business where there are enough paying customers to pay the bills.


DISTANCE = TIME = $

The Rural Health Care Access Challenge:

Get the person to where the health care is or get the health care to where the person is… and find a way to pay for the care.


All occupations face shortages

ISSUE: How will health care attract its needed share of a limited supply of workers?

  • Challenges:

  • Finding enough employees

  • … with appropriate education and skills

Critical importance of K-12 Education: we will need young people prepared to acquire the KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS and ETHICS necessary for health careers.


As workers become scarce and expensive…

Incentives to:

1. Use technology to reduce labor need.

2. Redesign way services are delivered to use labor more efficiently.

3. Use different mixes of occupations.

Improve labor productivity


For more information:

Workforce Analysis Program

Office of Rural Health and Primary Care

Minnesota Department of Health

Jay Fonkert

651-282-5642

[email protected]


THE END

Following slides are held in reserve.


Vacancy rates in nursing occupations have been quite high, but generally declined.


Vacancy rates in other health occupation vary widely, and sometimes are erratic.


Workforce stories

“It’s physician specialists that help draw patients into your facility.”

Hospital CEO, Marshall MN

Pop: 12,788

Marshall Independent, March 1, 2005

COMMENT: Critical mass affects economic viability. Regional centers will be higher level health care centers.


Workforce stories

“Going to a small town and having an abundance of patients that you are going to lose money on when you have $180,000 of debt doesn’t make it.”

Rural MN Dentist

Northwest Dentistry

January-February, 2005

COMMENT: Providers need paying customers – whether they be private sector or government.


Workforce stories

“When those ambulance people come up to your side… you want them to be the best.”

Supporter of higher national EMT standards

“These guys have jobs. They work at the Cenex store, they work at the butcher shop. They’re farmers trying to get their crops in.”

Director of North Dakota EMS Association

COMMENT: Higher professional standards, advanced training requirements and expensive technology tend to favor concentration of health care services in regional centers.


Health Care in the Minnesota Economy

Share of personal income 9.3%

Share of wages and salaries10.0%

Percent of employment10.4%

The health care industry creates jobs and buying power in communities with hospitals, clinics and care facilities.

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, regional accounts, 2003. All data reported by place of work.


Minnesota Health Care Employment

By type of business

Offices of physicians and dentists44,09115%

Outpatient care centers32,51311%

Home health services17,855 6%

Other ambulatory care services14,207 5%

Hospitals99,99035%

Nursing care facilities42,94015%

Residential MR/MH/substance abuse fac.22,495 8%

Other residential facilities 15,371 5%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, 2002.


  • Login