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Analysis of “My Two Lives”. Presentation By: Aaron, Garrett, John, Moody, and Katie . Background on the Author. Jhumpa Lahiri was born in 1967 in London Raised in Rhode Island Master of Arts in creative writing and comparative literature. Plus, a PhD from Boston University

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Analysis of my two lives

Analysis of “My Two Lives”

Presentation By: Aaron, Garrett, John, Moody, and Katie


Background on the author
Background on the Author

  • Jhumpa Lahiri was born in 1967 in London

  • Raised in Rhode Island

  • Master of Arts in creative writing and comparative literature.

  • Plus, a PhD from Boston University

  • Won many awards examples being: The 2000 Pulitzer prize for Fiction and The PEN/Hemingway Award


Audience
Audience

After reading the article we believe the author intends the audience to be older aged people. We think this because of her solemn tone and serious nature. Also, I think immigrants that can relate to her experience. However, we think that she wants people in America to know how she feels and the struggles immigrants face.


Summary
Summary

Growing up as an Indian-American proves to be a big challenge for Jhumpa. She struggles with keeping her native customs and being able to adapt to the American lifestyle. Her parents decide that they were not going to become accustomed, but to live their traditions in America. she on the other hand wants to become involved and comfortable in Rhode Island. Becoming older and older she increasingly accepts her Indian background although not fully. Also, accepts the American culture. After, her parents die it seems as though she does fully appreciate her background. In the end, she lives happily as a Indian-American with her husband.


Thesis
Thesis

“I felt intense pressure to be two things, loyal to the old world and fluent in the new, approved of either side of the hyphen.”

Why this sentence?

~In the article she talks about struggles with being “Indian-American.” The thesis sentence introduces what challenges she faces. This is the basis of the article leading to how she copes with them.


Strengths
Strengths

  • Great in depth prospective on her feelings about her struggles. The audience can truly feel how she feels because of all the details given.

  • Develops character well with both the Indian and American sides of her culture.


Weaknesses
Weaknesses

  • Lack of emotion when her parents pass away.

  • Writing is not interesting and does nothing to capture the readers attention.

  • Her use of ethos does not help the audience see a change in character. She tells us she fully accepts the things are, but does not show us or provide examples.


Quick reminders
Quick Reminders

Ethos: Appeals to Ethics

Ex: Writer’s belief, character, and ethics

Pathos: Emotional Appeal

Ex: Pathetic appeal, sympathy, and empathy

Logos: Appeal to Logic and Mind

Ex: Reasoning, facts, and information


Ethos
Ethos

“In addition to my distinguishing name and looks, I did not attend Sunday school, did not know how to ice skate, and disappeared to India for months at a time” (para 3).

“As a child I sought perfection and so denied myself the claim to any identity” (para 6).

“The traditions on either side of the hyphen dwell in me like siblings, still occasionally sparring, one outshining the other depending on the day” (para 5).

“What a difference from my early life, when there was no such way to describe me, when the most I could do was clumsily and ineffectually explain” (para 6).

“While I am American by virtue of the fact that I was raised in this country, I am Indian thanks to the efforts of two individuals” (para 7).


Pathos
Pathos

“When I was growing up in Rhode Island in the 1970s I felt neither Indian nor American” (para 1).

“These ordinary facts seemed part of a secret, utterly alien way of life, and I took pains to hide them from my American friends” (para 2).

“According to my parents I was not American, nor would I ever be no matter how hard I tried” (para 3).

“I avoided talking about in my childhood, fearful of what people might say. Around non-Indian friends, I no longer feel compelled to hide the fact that I speak another language” (para 5).

“As an adult I accept that a bicultural upbringing is a rich but imperfect thing” (para 7).


Logos
Logos

“I feel Indian not because of the time I’ve spent in India or because of my genetic composition but rather because of my parent’s steadfast presence in my life” (para 7).

“I can see a day coming when my American side, lacking the counterpoint India has until now maintained, begins to gain ascendancy and weight” (para 8).

“My first book was published in 1999, and around then, on the cusp of a new century, the term “Indian American” has become part of this country's vocabulary” (para 4).

“At home I followed the customs of my parents, speaking Bengal and eating rice and dal with my fingers” (para 2).

“What drew me to my craft was the desire to force the two worlds I occupied to mingle on the page as I was not brave enough, or mature enough, to allow in life" (para 5).


Overlap
Overlap

“At home I followed the customs of my parents, speaking Bengal and eating rice and dal with my fingers” (para 2).

*Ethos-Logos

“What drew me to my craft was the desire to force the two worlds I occupied to mingle on the page as I was not brave enough, or mature enough, to allow in life" (para 5).

*Logos-Pathos

“The traditions on either side of the hyphen dwell in me like siblings, still occasionally sparring, one outshining the other depending on the day” (para 5).

*Pathos-Ethos


Conclusion
Conclusion

Every piece of literature has some form of logos, pathos, and ethos. This article in particular is filled with pathos and ethos; with some logos in the article too. In order to find these, a reader must critically think about writing and what the author is trying to say. With the use of ethos in this article Jhumpa develops her character and personal beliefs. Using logos, her reasoning for the way she is established. Finally, her use of pathos shows her feelings associated with the struggles she faced growing up.


Pop quiz
Pop Quiz

Do you really know ethos, pathos, and logos?

Question 1

“In addition to my distinguishing name and looks, I did not attend Sunday school, did not know how to ice skate, and disappeared to India for months at a time” (para 3).


Question 2
Question 2

“I avoided talking about in my childhood, fearful of what people might say. Around non-Indian friends, I no longer feel compelled to hide the fact that I speak another language” (para 5).


Question 3
Question 3

“I feel Indian not because of the time I’ve spent in India or because of my genetic composition but rather because of my parent’s steadfast presence in my life” (para 7).


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