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Creating Citable Data Identifiers. Ryan Scherle Mark Diggory. Mimosa house 807 South Virginia Dare Trail Kill Devil Hills, NC USA 27948. 1903-12- 17 36.019705 N, 75.668769 W. 79330-S84-A41 WP0ZZZ99ZTS392124. Loxosceles reclusa. Citing identifiers. Mimosa house

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Creating citable data identifiers

Creating Citable Data Identifiers

Ryan Scherle

Mark Diggory


  • Mimosa house

  • 807 South Virginia Dare Trail

  • Kill Devil Hills, NC USA

  • 27948




Loxoscelesreclusa


Citing identifiers
Citing identifiers

  • Mimosa house

  • 807 South Virginia Dare Trail

  • 1903-12-17

  • 27948

  • Loxoscelesreclusa

  • 36.019705 N, 75.668769 W

  • 79330-S84-A41

  • WP0ZZZ99ZTS392124


Identifiers matter
Identifiers matter

  • Some identifiers are machine-friendly, some are human-friendly

  • For citations, you need to strike a balance

  • Good identifiers are a critical selling point for an repository


http://purl.dlib.indiana.edu/iudl/lilly/slocum/LL-SLO-009276


Principles of citable identifiers
Principles ofcitable identifiers


1 use dois
1. Use DOIs

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab

  • Scientists are familiar with DOIs


1 use dois1
1. Use DOIs

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab

  • Scientists are familiar with DOIs

  • DOIs are supported by many tools and services


1 use dois2
1. Use DOIs

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab

  • Scientists are familiar with DOIs

  • DOIs are supported by many tools and services

    Current support:


2 keep identifiers simple
2. Keep identifiers simple

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab

  • Complex identifiers are fine for machines, but they’re bad for humans.

  • Despite best intentions, humans sometimes need to work with identifiers manually.

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1743131X11Y.0000000009

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-220851-5.00003-4


2 keep identifiers simple1
2. Keep identifiers simple

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab

  • Complex identifiers are fine for machines, but they’re bad for humans.

  • Despite best intentions, humans sometimes need to work with identifiers manually.

    Current support:


3 use syntax to illustrate relationships
3. Use syntax to illustrate relationships

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab/3

  • Adding a tiny bit of semantics to an identifier is incredibly useful

    http://files.eprints.org/691/

    http://files.eprints.org/447/

    http://files.eprints.org/556/

  • Useful for various human “hacks”

  • Useful for statistics


3 use syntax to illustrate relationships1
3. Use syntax to illustrate relationships

  • http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab/3

  • Adding a tiny bit of semantics to an identifier is incredibly useful

    Current support:


4 when meaning bearing content changes create a versioned identifier
4. When “meaning-bearing” content changes, create a versioned identifier

  • Scientists want data to be invariant to enable reuse by machines

  • Even a single bit makes a difference

  • Watch out for implicit abstractions…http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.123ab/thumbnail

  • What about DOI conventions?


5 when meaningless content changes retain the current identifier
5. When “meaningless” content changes, retain the current identifier

  • Descriptive metadata must be editable without creating a new identifier.

  • Humans rarely care about metadata changes, especially for citation purposes!

  • Caveat: machine-oriented systems may consider the “metadata” to be data, which requires identifier changes



Principles of citable identifiers1
Principles of citable identifiers

1. Use DOIs

2. Keep identifiers simple

3. Use syntax to illustrate relationships

4. When “meaning-bearing” content changes, create a versioned identifier

5. When “meaningless” content changes, retain the current identifier


Hacking dspace to support
Hacking DSpace to support…

  • DOI identifier registration

  • Semantics in identifiers

  • Citation publication

  • Versioning


Dspace identifier services
DSpace identifier services

  • Handle system independence

    • More future identifier systems will come.

  • Granular control

    • Separate reservation from registration

  • Citation

    • Registration of metadata with external services



Datacite content service
DataCite content service


Promoting accurate citations
Promoting accurate citations

Added suggested citation formats up front


Versioning
Versioning

  • Versioning is item “editioning”

  • Creation of new versions is a “user mediated” process (submitter or reviewer)

  • Versioning does not alter the original item

  • Version relationships are maintained independent of the item’s metadata



Result citable data versions
Result: Citable data versions

doi:10.5061/dryad.bb7m4


Future technical directions
Future technical directions

  • Add metadata versioning under the hood -- may need to rethink some of the current system

  • Integrate our changes to core DSpace

  • Moving these features into the core requires further discussion with the Dspace user community


How are we doing
How are we doing?

For 186 articles associated with Dryad deposits:

  • 77% had “good” citations to the data

  • 2% had “bad” citations to the data

  • 21% had no data citations

    Standards for data citation are still evolving.Journals have yet to agree on where to place data citations, and authors are just starting to become familiar with the concept.


What should you do now
What should you do now?

  • Analyze how data is used and cited outside the repository

  • Determine whether use is more machine-oriented or more human-oriented

  • Design identifiers and identifier management to facilitate the observed uses


Thanks
Thanks!

Ryan Scherle

[email protected]

Mark Diggory

[email protected]


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