We ve got the beat
Download
1 / 25

We’ve got the beat! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 148 Views
  • Uploaded on

We’ve got the beat!. Rhythm in poetry in general and in the works of Will Shakespeare in particular. Rhythm in poetry? . Some poetry has a very specific rhythm called “ METER .” This rhythm is achieved through the use of s tressed and unstressed syllables. Syll -a-WHAT-able?.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' We’ve got the beat!' - sadie


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
We ve got the beat

We’ve got the beat!

Rhythm in poetry in general

and in the works of

Will Shakespeare

in particular.


Rhythm in poetry

Rhythm in poetry?

Some poetry has a very specific rhythm

called “METER.”

This rhythm is achieved through the use of

stressed and unstressed syllables.


Syll a what able

Syll-a-WHAT-able?

Syllables are the building blocks of words.

You say all of the letters in one syllable together.

When you move your mouth to say another group of letters, you are moving to the next syllable.

SYL – LA - BLE


I m stressed

“I’m STRESSED!”

You say all of the letters in the word “stressed” together in one syllable:

STRESST.


I m stressed1

“I’m STRESSED!”

Now say those two words aloud:

Chances are,

you said the word “stressed” louder and with greater emphasis than the word “I’m.”

That makes “stressed” a stressed syllable!


Word hopscotch

Word Hopscotch

…Think of stressed and unstressed words as the boxes on a hopscotch board.

The squares you land on with one foot are unstressed syllables.

The rectangles you land on with both feet are stressed syllables.


Try this

Try this…

Say the word “horizon” out loud.

How many syllables does it have?

Which syllable did you stress the most

when you said it?


H or i zon

hor- I - zon

“Horizon” has three syllables.

The middle syllable is stressed.

The other two syllables are unstressed.


On a hopscotch board horizon would look like this

On a hopscotch board,

“horizon” would look like this:

.

I

hor

zon


H r i z n

hŏr- i - zŏn

This is how you would mark up the meter of word “horizon”.

The unstressed syllables have a above them.

The stressed syllable has a above it.


Marking up meter in this way is called scansion.

The two symbols have names:

= breve (pronounced “breeve”)

= ictus


Now write your name and mark up its scansion

Bar bar a Jen nes

Now, write your name

and mark up its scansion.


Speaking of feet…

Sometimes poets use repeating units of rhythm in their poems.

These units are called “feet”

(a single unit is called a “foot”).


Common poetic feet:

Iamb: (today, because)

Trochee: (happy, lightly, yonder)

Anapest: (understand, interrupt)

Dactyl: (strawberry, obvious)

Spondee: (love song, ding-dong)


I am an iamb:

The iambic foot is one of the most

popular “building blocks” of meter

used in poetry.

It has a driving rhythm:

Da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM


Will-i-amb?

Shakespeare used iambic meter

extensively in his plays.

He worked in a form called “blank verse” – unrhymed iambic pentameter.


iambic pentameter

Look at the term above.

If iambic means “using iamb feet”

and meter means “rhythm,”

what’s the “penta” part for?


Pentagon pentagram pentadactyl

penta = five

Pentagon

Pentagram

Pentadactyl


I am a pi rate with a wood en leg

iambic pentameter = having five iamb feet

I am a pi- rate with a wood en leg

1 2 3 4 5


i

P I-

rate

a

WITH

WOOD-

AM

a

en

LEG

i AM a PI- rate WITH a WOOD- en LEG


that

PLEASE

don’t

TAKE

DOG

bid,

is

its

RA-

BONE

that DOG is RA- bid, PLEASE don’t TAKE its BONE


o

LIND

these

TREES

shall

BOOKS

a-

my

BE

ROS-

o, ROS - a - LIND these TREES shall BE my BOOKS


and

IN

his

PARTS

TIME

plays

ONE

MAN-

man

y

and ONE man IN his TIME plays MAN- y PARTS



Q: WHY DO POETS

WRITE POEMS

THAT ADHERE TO STRICT METER PATTERNS?

(like iambic pentameter)


ad