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Grab Bag of Interesting Stuff. Higher Order types. Type constructors are higher order since they take types as input and return types as output. Some type constructors (and also some class definitions) are even higher order, since they take type constructors as arguments.

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Grab Bag of Interesting Stuff

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Grab bag of interesting stuff

Grab Bag of Interesting Stuff


Higher order types

Higher Order types

  • Type constructors are higher order since they take types as input and return types as output.

  • Some type constructors (and also some class definitions) are even higher order, since they take type constructors as arguments.

  • Haskell’s Kind system

    • A Kind is haskell’s way of “typing” types

    • Ordinary types have kind *

      • Int :: *

      • [ String ] :: *

    • Type constructors have kind * -> *

      • Tree :: * -> *

      • [] :: * -> *

      • (,) :: * -> * -> *


The functor class

The Functor Class

class Functor f where

fmap :: (a -> b) -> (f a -> f b)

  • Note how the class Functorrequires a type constructor of kind * -> *as an argument.

  • The method fmap abstracts the operation of applying a function on every parametric Argument.

a

a a

Type T a =

x

x x

(f x)

(f x) (f x)

fmap f


Notes

Notes

  • Special syntax for built in type constructors

    (->) :: * -> * -> *

    [] :: * -> *

    (,) :: * -> * -> *

    (,,) :: * -> * -> * -> *

  • Most class definitions have some implicit laws that all instances should obey. The laws for Functor are:

    fmap id = id

    fmap (f . g) = fmap f . fmap g


Instances of class functor

Instances of class functor

data Tree a = Leaf a

| Branch (Tree a) (Tree a)

instance Functor Tree where

fmap f (Leaf x) = Leaf (f x)

fmap f (Branch x y) =

Branch (fmap f x) (fmap f y)

instance Functor ((,) c) where

fmap f (x,y) = (x, f y)


More instances

More Instances

instance Functor [] where

fmap f [] = []

fmap f (x:xs) = f x : fmap f xs

instance Functor Maybe where

fmap f Nothing = Nothing

fmap f (Just x) = Just (f x)


Other uses of higher order t c s

Other uses of Higher order T.C.’s

data Tree t a = Tip a

| Node (t (Tree t a))

t1 = Node [Tip 3, Tip 0]

Main> :t t1

t1 :: Tree [] Int

data Bin x = Two x x

t2 = Node (Two(Tip 5) (Tip 21))

Main> :t t2

t2 :: Tree Bin Int


What is the kind of tree

What is the kind of Tree?

  • Tree is a binary type constructor

    • It’s kind will be something like: ? -> ? -> *

  • The first argument to Tree is itself a type constructor, the second is just an ordinary type.

    • Tree :: (* -> *)-> * -> *


Functor instances of tree

Functor instances of Tree

instance Functor (Tree2 Bin) where

fmap f (Tip x) = Tip(f x)

fmap f (Node (Two x y)) =

Node (Two (fmap f x) (fmap f y))

instance Functor (Tree2 []) where

fmap f (Tip x) = Tip(f x)

fmap f (Node xs) = Node (map (fmap f) xs)


Can we do better

Can we do better

instance Functor t => Functor (Tree2 t) where

fmap f (Tip x) = Tip(f x)

fmap f (Node xs) = Node (fmap (fmap f) xs)


The monad class

The Monad Class

Note m is a

type constructor

class Monad m where

(>>=) :: m a -> (a -> m b) -> m b

(>>) :: m a -> m b -> m b

return :: a -> m a

fail :: String -> m a

p >> q = p >>= \ _ -> q

fail s = error s


Generic monad functions

Generic Monad functions

sequence :: Monad m => [m a] -> m [a]

sequence = foldrmcons (return [])

where mcons p q = do x <- p

xs <- q

return (x:xs)

sequence_ :: Monad m => [m a] -> m ()

sequence_ = foldr (>>) (return ())

mapM :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m [b]

mapM f as = sequence (map f as)

mapM_ :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m ()

mapM_ f as = sequence_ (map f as)

(=<<) :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> m a -> m b

f =<< x = x >>= f


Files and handles

Files and Handles

  • The functions:

    import System.IO

    writeFile:: FilePath -> String -> IO ()

    appendFile :: FilePath -> String -> IO ()

    are used to read and write to files, but they incur quite a bit of overhead if they are used many times in a row. Instead we wish to open a file once, then make many actions on the file before we close it for a final time.

    openFile :: FilePath -> IOMode -> IO Handle

    hClose :: Handle -> IO ()

    data IOMode = ReadMode | WriteMode | AppendMode

    deriving (Eq, Ord, Ix, Bounded, Enum, Read, Show)


File modes

File Modes

  • A file mode tells how an open file will be used. Different modes support different operations.

  • When in WriteMode

    hPutChar :: Handle -> Char -> IO ()

    hPutStr :: Handle -> String -> IO ()

    hPutStrLn :: Handle -> String -> IO ()

    hPrint :: Show a => Handle -> a -> IO ()

  • When in ReadMode

    hGetChar :: Handle -> IO Char

    hGetLine :: Handle -> IO String


Standard channels and errors

Standard Channels and Errors

  • Predefined standard Channels

    stdin, stdout, stderr :: Handle

  • Error Handling while doing IO

    isEOFError :: IOError -> Bool

    -- Test if the EOF error

    ioError :: IOError -> IO a

    -- Raise an IOError

    catch :: IO a -> (IOError -> IO a) -> IO a

    -- Handle an Error

  • Other IO types of errors and their predicates.

    isAlreadyExistsError, isDoesNotExistError, 

    isAlreadyInUseError, isFullError, 

    isEOFError, isIllegalOperation,

    isPermissionError, isUserError, 


Ioerror

IOError

  • IOError is an abstract datatype

    • NOT and algebraic datatype, defined with data like [ ] orTree

  • Thus it does not admit pattern matching.

  • Hence the use of all the IOError recognizing predicates.

    • isAlreadyExistsError, isDoesNotExistError, 

    • isAlreadyInUseError, isFullError, 

    • isEOFError, isIllegalOperation,

    • isPermissionError, isUserError

  • This was a concious decision, made to allow easy extension of the kinds of IOErrors, as the system grew.


Handling io errors

Handling IO Errors

  • Any action of type IO a may potentially cause an IO Error.

  • The function

    catch ::IO a -> (IOError -> IO a) -> IO a

    can be used to gracefully handle such an error by providing a “fix”

    getChar' :: IO Char

    getChar' = catch getChar

    (\ e -> return '\n')

    getChar2 :: IO Char

    getChar2 = catch getChar

    (\ e -> if isEOFError e

    then return '\n'

    else ioError e) –- pass non EOF errors on


An example

An Example

getLine' :: IO String

getLine' = catch getLine''

(\ e -> return

("Error: " ++ show e))

where getLine'' =

do { c <- getChar2

; if c == '\n'

then return ""

else do { l <- getLine'

; return (c:l)

}

}


Catching errors when opening files

Catching errors when opening files

getAndOpenFile :: String -> IOMode -> IO Handle

getAndOpenFile prompt mode =

do { putStr prompt

; name <- getLine

; catch (openFile name mode)

(\e -> do { putStrLn

("Cannot open: "++name)

; print e

; getAndOpenFile prompt mode

})

}


Copying files

Copying Files

main =

do { fromHandle <- getAndOpenFile

"Copy from: " ReadMode

; toHandle <- getAndOpenFile

"Copy to: " WriteMode

; contents <- hGetContentsfromHandle

; hPutStrtoHandle contents

; hClosefromHandle

; hClosetoHandle

; putStr "Done\n"

}


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