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Statutory requirements- Coordinate the Work Environment . Session 3- Supervision . Supervision. Well-structured and supported supervision can improve work practice and client outcomes and reduce burnout. It is an important part of ensuring the quality and safety of health services.

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Supervision
Supervision

Well-structured and supported supervision can improve work practice and client outcomes and reduce burnout.

It is an important part of ensuring the quality and safety of health services.

Skills in both giving and receiving supervision will increase the likelihood of successful supervisory relationships

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


At a basic level supervision can be a used to ensure that your work is at a suitable standard to ‘pass probation’ or to renew a contract.

However, it can also be much more. Supervision can provide an opportunity to formally reflect on your strengths, pinpoint areas for development, and discuss strategies (and budget) to address your needs.

A committed manager will provide feedback to promote your growth and development as a professional

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


  • During supervision times, the worker should: your work is at a suitable standard to ‘pass probation’ or to renew a contract.

    • provide objective feedback

    • highlight strengths,

    • identify areas of practice that require work

    • and re-set tasks that will assist the student acquire the module learning outcomes.

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


The supervisory process has three principal functions
The supervisory process has three principal functions your work is at a suitable standard to ‘pass probation’ or to renew a contract. :

  • The educative function

  • The supportive function

  • The administrative or management function

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


The educative function your work is at a suitable standard to ‘pass probation’ or to renew a contract. , development of knowledge and relevant skills needed for effective practice

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


The supportive function your work is at a suitable standard to ‘pass probation’ or to renew a contract. , help for students to deal with vocational stress and to develop appropriate attitudes and feelings conducive to vocational performance

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


The administrative or management function, your work is at a suitable standard to ‘pass probation’ or to renew a contract. assists students manage their day to day work tasks while on vocational experience. Eg. planning work, review of learning outcomes, responsibility and accountability as a worker

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


Successful supervision depends on developing a relationship based on trust. There are a number of principles to remember when providing or receiving supervision:

  • Use adult learning principles. Adults prefer supervision to be goal-oriented, relevant, practical, and respectful treating the supervisor/supervisee as equal partners.

  • Appreciate different learning styles – what works for you may not work for someone else!

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


  • Always provide based on trust. There are a number of principles to remember when providing or receiving supervision:high quality feedback (specific, factual, descriptive, constructive, understood, timely, sensitive and directed at the behaviour).

  • Make a plan – plan how often and what methods will be used, make some supervisory goals and plan how you might deal with conflict.

  • Determine how you will assess or evaluate performance – this could be by observation, written materials of self-assessment

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


Most workplaces will have a formal performance management process, which will include clinical and professional supervision.

If your workplace doesn’t have a formal process, discuss this with your manager. Ask for regular appointments, particularly during your formal orientation and in the first year of your position.

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


If your manager is unable to provide supervision, think about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

Your work team

Other local peers / colleagues

Videoconference / teleconference contact with professionals outside of your town

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


Power in supervision
Power in Supervision about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

How to avoid a supervisory relationship becoming dysfunctional:

  • If supervisors feel uncomfortable with authority and side-step problems. This may only confuse the student

  • The supervisor may step down from authority because if they are worried about upsetting students or fear students will not accept their authority.

  • If supervisors abuse their authority and are overly critical and judgmental


Principles for positive supervision
Principles for Positive about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: Supervision

The following principles should be discussed in initial supervision sessions:

  • Students and supervisors recognise the power of supervisors in formal role and position.

  • Power is exercised constructively in a two-way relationship between people of equal status and worth as human beings.

  • Students and supervisors recognise the informal power that derives both from their professional and personal attributes, and from identities based on gender, age, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, ideology or disability


Differences
Differences about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

The impact of difference is a reality in supervision.

perceived differences can be linked to the need to raise issues

it can make students and supervisors anxious, fearing they will make things worse

Differences between the student and supervisor need to be openly recognised

supervisory power may be amplified or minimised by differences and similarities in age, gender, culture, experience or disability


On the job
On-the-job about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

  • Demonstrate, explain and ask questions of the student whilst you are carrying out a task yourself. Something may look easy eg producing a program plan but the student might need help to understand underpinning knowledge.

  • Guide the learner through a task, ensuring understanding at each stage. Be mindful that students may only see what they already understand.

  • Observe the student at work and recognise their difficulties.


One to one
One-to-one about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

One to one supervision can also take the form of an organised regular meeting issues are explored eg case discussion, doubts and anxieties, reviewing learning outcomes and student’s performance, identifying and exploring areas for further practice or training.

In some instances

supervisors get students to keep a journal as a focus for

their reflection ie a record of events with notes on what

happened. This encourages them to explore their understanding, as well as their feelings about the experience. These experiences would then ultimately be discussed.


Groups peers
Groups/peers about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

These methods of supervision are less commonly used in the community sector but can be used to encourage students to be more reflective. Each person in the group, or one person in rotation from meeting to meeting, can share an experience in practice with the others. This provides an opportunity to explore different ways of practicing and

  • coping.


Supervisor s styles
Supervisor’s Styles about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

prescriptive- supervisors give advice ,and explicit directions to the student

informative -', supervisors impart knowledge and information to the student

confrontational –supervisors give clear, direct feedback about behaviour and challenge beliefs and attitudes

Facilitative styles are:

Cathartic: supervisors enable the student to release tensions and emotions

Reflective- Supervisors encourage the student to reflective and self directive

Supportive – supervisors confirm and validate the student's values and worth.


Structuring sessions
Structuring sessions about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

  • Learning can be done through informal contact, feedback and information-sharing

  • Instead supervision sessions are planned regular times students and, supervisors discuss students' work and review their progress.

  • Supervision is different to consultation or briefing or debriefing activities


Supervision1
Supervision about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

  • A supervision session should be :

    • Well planned,

    • Purposive

    • and goal-directed.

  • Planned contact ensures that supervision is a priority and doesn't just occur whenever things slow down

  • The frequency, timing and duration can be negotiated when the supervision contract is set up at the beginning of placement.


Suggestions for successful supervision sessions
Suggestions for successful about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: supervision sessions

Students propose an agenda and give it to their supervisors two days before the session

Students give their journals, records two days before the meeting so that key issues and concerns can be highlighted.

students and supervisors use the last five minutes of each supervision session to set agenda for the next session.


Planning for future learning
Planning for future learning about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

  • Allow some time before the end of each session to review how the time was spent.

  • Review the processes as well as the content of the session.

  • Ford andJones(1967) suggest that the style of supervision can get 'fixed' and using a variety of methods and tools can make the process more interesting.


Recording supervision sessions
Recording Supervision Sessions about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

  • Recording can be very useful to ensure:

  • everyone is clear about feedback, especially if the notes are shared.

  • It ensures transparency and reduces students' concerns.

  • It models the process of keeping careful records of contact

  • It collates examples and concrete evidence that can be used in required evaluation documentation.


Feedback
Feedback about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

Giving feedback can be difficult for the supervisor and student because it means dealing with the feelings that this brings up.

Three purposes for feedback:

Confirmatory- It lets students know when they are on the right path

Corrective- It provides students with information they need to get back on course

Motivating and challenging- It shows the consequences of both adequate and inadequate performance


Receiving feedback
Receiving Feedback about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

  • Do you ask for feedback from students or do you avoid it?

    • Ask for feedback- practice makes perfect

    • Try not to becomes defensive- treat feedback as a source of information

    • Respond to unfair feedback- if feedback is given in a inappropriate manner state that you disagree but do not deny the other person of their view.


References
references about other ways you can access supervisory support. Possible sources include: 

SARRAH Education and Training

  • http://www.sarrahtraining.com.au

Social and Community Services/Granville TAFE/ Professional Practice/version 1 2011/ Disclaimer; printed copies of this document are regarded as uncontrolled.


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