Norwegian Lundehund

Norwegian Lundehund PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 135 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Download Presentation

Norwegian Lundehund

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Norwegian Lundehund A breed seminar presented by the Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Incorporated

2. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Contents Unique features Geographic considerations Breed History Breeding Breed Standard Question / Answer

3. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. A Lunde-WHAT? “Lunde” is from the Norwegian name for the Puffin bird. “hund” is Norwegian for dog. The Norwegian Lundehund is a member of the Spitz family. Its coat is dense, yet lies flat to the body. It does resemble a fox, with its prick ears and wedge-shaped head. They are small, and compact, weighing from 13 to 17 pounds, and vary in height from 12 ½ to 15 inches at the shoulder, with females being slightly smaller than the males.“Lunde” is from the Norwegian name for the Puffin bird. “hund” is Norwegian for dog. The Norwegian Lundehund is a member of the Spitz family. Its coat is dense, yet lies flat to the body. It does resemble a fox, with its prick ears and wedge-shaped head. They are small, and compact, weighing from 13 to 17 pounds, and vary in height from 12 ½ to 15 inches at the shoulder, with females being slightly smaller than the males.

4. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Norwegian Lundehund One of the rarest dogs in the world Current estimates 1,500 – 2,000 world-wide 350 in US We can say “rarest” dog in the world, in terms of its low numbers of individuals, and it’s unique characteristics. There is no other breed in the world who possesses these unique featuresWe can say “rarest” dog in the world, in terms of its low numbers of individuals, and it’s unique characteristics. There is no other breed in the world who possesses these unique features

5. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Unique Features 6 toes per foot Flexible neck Flexible shoulders Foldable Ears

6. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Toes Rear Unlike other dogs which have four toes and a fifth dewclaw, the Lundehund is the only canine with FIVE fully developed toes plus a sixth toe (which is what we would consider a dewclaw). The rear two “extra” toes do not touch the ground but are useful for grasping hillsides. “Due to their shoulder structure, they paddle in front when they walk. They move rather wide in front and very narrow behind. The Norwegians constantly tell us that the Puffin Dog is designed for vertical movement on cliffs. Not for the horizontal” - Paul Ross, as told to DOG WORLD magazine, September 1987. Unlike other dogs which have four toes and a fifth dewclaw, the Lundehund is the only canine with FIVE fully developed toes plus a sixth toe (which is what we would consider a dewclaw). The rear two “extra” toes do not touch the ground but are useful for grasping hillsides. “Due to their shoulder structure, they paddle in front when they walk. They move rather wide in front and very narrow behind. The Norwegians constantly tell us that the Puffin Dog is designed for vertical movement on cliffs. Not for the horizontal” - Paul Ross, as told to DOG WORLD magazine, September 1987.

7. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Neck VERY flexible (Use laser pointer to circle head and ears, and trace a line along the curved neck and spine to the tip of his tail.) (Use laser pointer to circle head and ears, and trace a line along the curved neck and spine to the tip of his tail.)

8. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Shoulders Very flexible NOT double-jointed, as commonly stated Agility vital to their cliff climbing abilities Allegedly, missing tendon normally found in other canines, which enables the extended flexibility. Heard this from Norwegian Judge… trying to confirm w/ vets.Allegedly, missing tendon normally found in other canines, which enables the extended flexibility. Heard this from Norwegian Judge… trying to confirm w/ vets.

9. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Ears Ears can fold tightly in 2 directions Keeps dirt & water out when they are hunting

10. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Geographical considerations

11. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Where do they come from?

12. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Geographical remoteness An actual satellite image of the very remote, very isolated islands of Værøy and Røst, which are the homeland of the Norwegian Lundehund. These tiny islands lie in the southwestern-most tip of the Lofoten Islands, all of which are above the Arctic Circle and off the coast of northern Norway. They are so remote that the only way to get there is by flying to the nearest airport on the mainland (the small town of Bodø), and booking a 90 kilometer helicopter ride from Bodø to Værøy; or, taking a long ferry ride to the Lofotens, and hiring a small boat to take you to Værøy. It is because of this remoteness that the breed has been able to remain pure and untouched for so long; its distinctive characteristics intact and un-fooled-around-with by humans for centuries. An actual satellite image of the very remote, very isolated islands of Værøy and Røst, which are the homeland of the Norwegian Lundehund. These tiny islands lie in the southwestern-most tip of the Lofoten Islands, all of which are above the Arctic Circle and off the coast of northern Norway. They are so remote that the only way to get there is by flying to the nearest airport on the mainland (the small town of Bodø), and booking a 90 kilometer helicopter ride from Bodø to Værøy; or, taking a long ferry ride to the Lofotens, and hiring a small boat to take you to Værøy. It is because of this remoteness that the breed has been able to remain pure and untouched for so long; its distinctive characteristics intact and un-fooled-around-with by humans for centuries.

13. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Værøy Steep cliffs on Værøy provide the world’s largest puffin nesting area Puffins require remote places to nest because they build their nests in the ground, in high places away from predators. They will only choose sites high up on top of steep slopes, in the crags and crevices of rocks, where they build their tunnels. You can imagine how hard it is for a person to walk up to their nesting grounds; one miss-step and you’d slip into the sea. Many Norse farmers died this way, trying to hunt for puffins. Puffins require remote places to nest because they build their nests in the ground, in high places away from predators. They will only choose sites high up on top of steep slopes, in the crags and crevices of rocks, where they build their tunnels. You can imagine how hard it is for a person to walk up to their nesting grounds; one miss-step and you’d slip into the sea. Many Norse farmers died this way, trying to hunt for puffins.

14. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Værøy – village of Måstad A tiny fishing village on VærøyA tiny fishing village on Værøy

15. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Early Lundehund History

16. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Early Lundehund history Speculation – may have survived last Ice Age Fact - traveled with Vikings Viking travel – the Welsh Corgi can trace it’s lineage back to the Lundehund Vikings traveled to England during 6th, 7th & 8th centuries At this time, the Vikings, also known as the Norse, included Norwegians, Swedes, Danes & Finns Map credit: http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/lia/vikings_during_mwp.html Viking travel – the Welsh Corgi can trace it’s lineage back to the Lundehund Vikings traveled to England during 6th, 7th & 8th centuries At this time, the Vikings, also known as the Norse, included Norwegians, Swedes, Danes & Finns Map credit: http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/lia/vikings_during_mwp.html

17. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Early Lundehund history 1432 – Earliest recorded sighting in Scandinavia 16th, 17th & 18th centuries – Dogs seen used for puffin hunting on Værøy, on the Lofoten islands, in Bergen & in Finland 1591 - As early as 1591 Erik Hansen Schønnebøl, a bailiff, tells of the puffins' nests on Værøy. In the scree and earth-passages he says that "one cannot easily get them out of these deep nesting holes unless one has an agile dog who is accustomed to crawl into the passages and to drag out the birds".  The use of Lundehunds for this work has therefore been general since Schønnebøl’s time 1664 – Italian Francesco Negri travelled to Finland in 1664-65 and described the capture of puffins by Lundehunds1591 - As early as 1591 Erik Hansen Schønnebøl, a bailiff, tells of the puffins' nests on Værøy. In the scree and earth-passages he says that "one cannot easily get them out of these deep nesting holes unless one has an agile dog who is accustomed to crawl into the passages and to drag out the birds".  The use of Lundehunds for this work has therefore been general since Schønnebøl’s time 1664 – Italian Francesco Negri travelled to Finland in 1664-65 and described the capture of puffins by Lundehunds

18. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Early Lundehund history Hunters began catching puffins with NETS, not dogs This is a photo from National Geographic (Jan. 1995). I think this is a re-enactment, because you cannot hunt puffins anymore. And these look like fake decoys.This is a photo from National Geographic (Jan. 1995). I think this is a re-enactment, because you cannot hunt puffins anymore. And these look like fake decoys.

19. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Early Lundehund history 1925 - Magazine article: “Bird-dog on Road to Oblivion” Article written in the Norwegian hunting and fishing union’s periodical in 1925. Written by Sigurd Skaun. In the past, it was not uncommon in Måstad, the fishing village on Værøy, for each household to own a dozen Lundehunds. They were as valuable as cows. But by the 1930’s they were not needed anymore since hunters were using nets instead. Lundehund population was down to a frightening low of only 60 or 70.Article written in the Norwegian hunting and fishing union’s periodical in 1925. Written by Sigurd Skaun. In the past, it was not uncommon in Måstad, the fishing village on Værøy, for each household to own a dozen Lundehunds. They were as valuable as cows. But by the 1930’s they were not needed anymore since hunters were using nets instead. Lundehund population was down to a frightening low of only 60 or 70.

20. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history Eleanor Christie, of Hamar, Norway Eleanor Christie – remember this name – Thanks to her perseverance, she saved the breed from extinction. She lived on the mainland of Norway, just north of Oslo, in the town of Hamar. At the time she came across the article about Lundehunds possibly disappearing, in 1937, there were only about 50 purebred dogs left, and they were all in Mastad, on Vaeroy. (The dogs on Rost were mixed with other breeds.) Mrs. Christie contacted a man named Monrad Mikalsen in Mastad, took a train and a boat, and got some puppies (3 females & 1 male) and took them home with her and started a kennel. Eleanor Christie – remember this name – Thanks to her perseverance, she saved the breed from extinction. She lived on the mainland of Norway, just north of Oslo, in the town of Hamar. At the time she came across the article about Lundehunds possibly disappearing, in 1937, there were only about 50 purebred dogs left, and they were all in Mastad, on Vaeroy. (The dogs on Rost were mixed with other breeds.) Mrs. Christie contacted a man named Monrad Mikalsen in Mastad, took a train and a boat, and got some puppies (3 females & 1 male) and took them home with her and started a kennel.

21. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history 1942 – WWII – distemper vaccine not available Hits Værøy – kills all but 1 on island Mrs. Christie sends 4 back to Værøy 1944 – Distemper hits mainland Kills all but 1 of Mrs. Christie’s dogs 1950 – Mrs. Christie gets 2 new puppies No litters from this pair 4 that Mrs. Christie sent – 2 pregnant females & 2 puppies These 4 saved the Lundehund from extinction. 1950 – new puppies from Mikalsen also4 that Mrs. Christie sent – 2 pregnant females & 2 puppies These 4 saved the Lundehund from extinction. 1950 – new puppies from Mikalsen also

22. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history 1955 – Værøy now bird sanctuary Puffins are protected species Lundehunds in crisis 1960 – Mr. Mikalsen sends Mrs. Christie three pups from same litter 1961 – Mrs. Christie announces a litter 1963 – Distemper hits Værøy again No Lundehunds left on island Mrs. Christie sends Mr. Mikalsen 2 puppies, which arrive on his 75th birthday During the time from 1950 to 1960, Mrs. Christie could not keep a kennel because her husband became ill and died. But she did not give up. Again she took up the work of saving the Lundehund. Monrad Mikalsen had not forgotten that she had helped him during the war and sent him puppies, so now he sent some to her. NOTE: Of the 6 remaining… 5 were from the same mother!!!During the time from 1950 to 1960, Mrs. Christie could not keep a kennel because her husband became ill and died. But she did not give up. Again she took up the work of saving the Lundehund. Monrad Mikalsen had not forgotten that she had helped him during the war and sent him puppies, so now he sent some to her. NOTE: Of the 6 remaining… 5 were from the same mother!!!

23. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history 1963 – Only SIX Lundehunds left alive world-wide 1972 – Norwegian TV makes film Popularity soars! Long waiting lists 1974 – Population up to 350 1976 – Mrs. Christie, now in her 80’s, has an audience with King of Norway

24. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history 1987 – Paul Ross, UK ex-pat, brings 1st Lundehund to US World-wide population 500+ Christen Lang, Mrs. Christie’s friend & protégé, personally delivers 3 more 1988 – Harvey & Judy Sanderson form 1st Lundehund club in US Paul Ross was living in England and raising Jack Russell terriers for hunting when he first heard about the Lundehund, and its amazing capability to climb mountains and enter rocky tunnels. He decided he had to have one, since the rocks in England were too difficult for his terriers to dig into. He tried for several years to get one from Norway but they were keeping a tight grip on their Lundies, at least until their numbers were up. A friend directed Paul to Julia McGrew in Denmark, who was a retired college professor of ancient Norse studies, who went to great lengths to assist Paul in importing Haldis. Paul now lives in Palisade, Colorado, and was our judge at the 2005 NLAA Show.Paul Ross was living in England and raising Jack Russell terriers for hunting when he first heard about the Lundehund, and its amazing capability to climb mountains and enter rocky tunnels. He decided he had to have one, since the rocks in England were too difficult for his terriers to dig into. He tried for several years to get one from Norway but they were keeping a tight grip on their Lundies, at least until their numbers were up. A friend directed Paul to Julia McGrew in Denmark, who was a retired college professor of ancient Norse studies, who went to great lengths to assist Paul in importing Haldis. Paul now lives in Palisade, Colorado, and was our judge at the 2005 NLAA Show.

25. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history 1989 – 1st US Specialty held by NLCA Christen Lang flew in to be judge Knows every pedigree by heart 2004 – 1st Specialty held by NLAA Has been held annually since Christen Lang invited to judge 2005 – NLAA recommended Parent Club status by AKC/FSS® Christen Lang was the Lundehund judge at the 2008 World Dog Show held in Stockholm, SwedenChristen Lang was the Lundehund judge at the 2008 World Dog Show held in Stockholm, Sweden

26. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Lundehund history 2007 – AKC Board of Directors votes to accept the Lundehund Entered the Miscellaneous Class on July 1, 2008 Currently projected to enter the Non-Sporting Group Anticipating a move to the proposed Northern Group

27. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breeding

28. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breeding In Norway, all breedings must be approved by NLK NLK standards call for a minimum of a 3 generation gap before a crossing A note about breeding: In Norway, all matings must be approved by the Norsk Lundehund Klub Breeders Committee, to ensure that the breedings aren’t too close. In America, the NLAA (Norwegian Lundehund Association of America) seeks to do the same here, by encouraging breeders to thoroughly research the pedigree of prospective parents before allowing a mating, and by systematically diversifying the gene pool in this country by importing selected dogs from overseas regularly. In 1987, when the first Lundehund was imported to America, and world Lundie population was less than 500, Scandinavian breeders insisted that all American owners breed their dogs, not keep them merely as pets. “However, now that we have more numbers, more dogs can become neutered pets and breeders can concentrate on breeding the best representations of the breed” (quote from Dr. Susan Torgerson-Taylor, veterinarian and Lundie owner). Recovery of the breed will be slow, and should be slow, as most bitches have only 2 or 3 pups in a litter. Speaking to the NLAA in 2004, Christen Lang recommended that, in accordance with the Norsk Lundehund Breeders Committee, each male be allowed to father a total of only 15 pups, and spread the matings out over his entire lifetime, so as to keep the gene pool diverse in any given year. We all will continue to cherish this fascinating and delightful, rare and unusual, dog. A note about breeding: In Norway, all matings must be approved by the Norsk Lundehund Klub Breeders Committee, to ensure that the breedings aren’t too close. In America, the NLAA (Norwegian Lundehund Association of America) seeks to do the same here, by encouraging breeders to thoroughly research the pedigree of prospective parents before allowing a mating, and by systematically diversifying the gene pool in this country by importing selected dogs from overseas regularly. In 1987, when the first Lundehund was imported to America, and world Lundie population was less than 500, Scandinavian breeders insisted that all American owners breed their dogs, not keep them merely as pets. “However, now that we have more numbers, more dogs can become neutered pets and breeders can concentrate on breeding the best representations of the breed” (quote from Dr. Susan Torgerson-Taylor, veterinarian and Lundie owner). Recovery of the breed will be slow, and should be slow, as most bitches have only 2 or 3 pups in a litter. Speaking to the NLAA in 2004, Christen Lang recommended that, in accordance with the Norsk Lundehund Breeders Committee, each male be allowed to father a total of only 15 pups, and spread the matings out over his entire lifetime, so as to keep the gene pool diverse in any given year. We all will continue to cherish this fascinating and delightful, rare and unusual, dog.

29. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed Standard

30. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed Standards Norsk Lundehund Klubb established 1st standard Recognized in FCI Group 5, Section 2 Current revision dated December 03, 1999 UKC recognized breed on January 01, 1995 1995 FCI version IABCA & ARBA uses current FCI standard AKC standard dated June 01, 2007 NLK formed in 1962 NLAA standard – changes Norwegian version into common American terminologyNLK formed in 1962 NLAA standard – changes Norwegian version into common American terminology

31. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) The following is from the AKC approved standard, written & submitted by the NLAA Used NLK standard as baseline

32. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) General Appearance – the Norwegian Lundehund is a small rectangular and agile Spitz breed with unique characteristics not found in any other breed. Originating on remote islands of arctic Norway, the dog was used to wrestle and retrieve live puffin birds from the crevices of steep vertical cliffs.

33. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) General Appearance (cont.) – To enable the dog to climb, descend, and brake on these cliffs, unique structural characteristics have evolved and must be present as they define this breed: a minimum of six toes on each foot and elongated rear foot pads, an elastic neck which allows the head to bend backwards to touch the spine, letting the dog turn around in narrow puffin bird caves, and shoulders flexible enough to allow the front legs to extend flat to the side in order to hug the cliffs. This shoulder structure produces a peculiar rotary movement.

34. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) General Appearance (cont.) – Finally, the ears close and fold forward or backward to protect from debris. The temperament is alert but not expected to be outgoing towards strangers.

35. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Size, Proportion, Substance, Height The desired height for adult males is between 13-15 inches and 12-14 inches for adult females. Size consideration should not outweigh that of type, proportion, movement and other functional attributes. Proportion - length of body is slightly longer than height at the withers. Depth of chest is approximately one half of the height. Substance - the Lundehund should be athletic and agile, never coarse or heavy. Bitches are distinctly feminine but without weakness.

36. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Head The head is wedge-shaped, of medium width and clean. The skull is slightly rounded with prominent brows. There is a pronounced but not deep stop and the bridge of the nose has a slight arch. The muzzle is of medium length and width, tapering gradually to the end of the muzzle. Length of the muzzle is approximately two-thirds the length of the skull. Nose and lips are black.

37. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Head

38. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Teeth Scissors bite is preferred but level and reverse scissors-bite are permitted. Missing premolars on both sides of the upper and lower jaws are common and allowed.

39. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Eyes Almond shaped, yellow-brown to brown with a brown ring around the pupil. Light eyes are preferred. Eye rims are dark and complete.

40. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Ears Medium size, triangular, broad at the base, carried erect and very mobile. The ear leather can be folded and turned up, backwards or at right angles so that the ear openings are clamped shut.

41. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Neck The neck is clean, of medium length and strong without being thick. NOTE:  The judge should never ask the handler to demonstrate the characteristic flexibility in the ring as the dog can not relax sufficiently at a dog show.

42. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Body Level back, short loin and slightly sloping croup, slight tuck up. Ribs are carried well back, well-sprung but not barrel shaped.

43. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Tail High set, medium length with a dense coat. When the dog is moving, the tail may be carried trailing or in a graceful arch over the back with the tip touching the back. A tightly curled tail or one that falls too far to either side is undesirable. When at rest, the tail hangs with a slight curve.

44. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Front feet The feet are oval with at least six fully developed toes, five of which should reach the ground. Eight pads on each foot. The additional toes consist of one three jointed toe, like a thumb, and one two jointed toe along with corresponding tendons and muscles which give the foot a strong appearance.

45. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Hindquarters Moderate angulation in balance with the forequarters. Strong muscular upper and lower thighs.

46. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Rear Feet Oval, slightly outward turned with a minimum of six toes, of which four support the dog’s weight. There are seven pads with the center pad elongated. When viewed from behind, the rear legs are close but parallel.

47. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Coat Double coat with a harsh outer coat and a dense, soft undercoat. The coat is short on the head and front of the legs, longer and thicker around the neck and back of thighs. It is dense on the tail with little feathering. The male typically has a thicker ruff around the neck. The Lundehund is presented naturally with no trimming.

48. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Color Fallow to reddish brown to tan with black hair tips and white markings or white with red or dark markings. More black hair tips with maturity. Dogs with a completely white head or with 50% of the head white should have complete dark eye rims and lashes.

49. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Breed standard (cont.) Temperament A Lundehund is alert, very energetic, loyal and protective. He can be wary of strangers, but never aggressive towards people.

50. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Question / Answer time

51. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Photo credits Christen Lang Cliffhanger Kennels - California http://www.cliffhangernorwegianlundehunds.com Eriksro Kennels - Finland http://www.eriksro.com NLAA, Inc. http://www.nlaainc.com Sakari Kennels - Colorado http://www.sakarikennels.com

52. Norwegian Lundehund Association of America, Inc. Thank you!

  • Login