Niagara Science Museum

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Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells. 125,000 TW of sun power Capturing 0.1% may provide abundant energy No dramatic economic implications, if solar cost is less than 3-5 /kWh. 2. EE at UB Graduate Seminar Presentatio

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1. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin- Film Solar Cells by Nick Dalacu 1

2. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells 125,000 TW of sun power Capturing 0.1% may provide abundant energy No dramatic economic implications, if solar cost is less than 3-5 ¢/kWh 2

3. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells

4. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1841, Edmund Becquerel, the son of a physicist and the father of another one, generated electricity by illuminating an electrode with different types of light, including sunlight

5. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1875, American, G.R. Carey invented the phototube. The light-sensitive photo-cathode consist of a thin film. Under illumination, low work-function metals, such as cesium, will release energetic electrons from the cathode.

6. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1877, W.G. Adams and R.E. Day generated a voltage by illuminating a selenium/platinum device. This was probably a Schottky-type Se/Pt barrier.

7. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1883, Charles Fritts was able to adhere a thin Se layer to a metal plate. By pressing a gold leaf to the exposed selenium surface, he prepared the first "thin-film" photovoltaic device.

8. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells Towards 1900, William Crookes improved the vacuum in discharge tubes and discovered cathode rays. Thompson balanced magnetic deflection with an electric field and determined the charge-mass ratio for electron.

9. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1930, 50 years after Fritts, Grondahl describes the development of a copper-cuprous oxide photo cell. This is the first true thin-film cell.

10. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells Bergmann improved selenium devices in the 1930’s. These proved superior to the cuprous- oxide based devices and became the commercially dominant product.

11. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1931, Wilson proposed the transport theory in semiconductors. ln 1938, Schottky suggested that the electrostatic field created by the positive and negative ions in the depletion region produce a potential barrier.

12. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In 1954, the PV effect in CdS was reported. The primary work was performed by Rappaport, Loferski and Jenny at RCA.

13. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells In the 1970s, CdTe-based and amorphous- silicon thin-film solar modules start the journey towards the large-scale application of photovoltaics.

14. Niagara Science Museum History of Thin Film Solar Cells Will they use PV when they will grow up?

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