Zimbabwe s Programme of Support to NAP for OVC  An example of coordination between Government and Civil Society

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Zimbabwe s Programme of Support to NAP for OVC An example of coordination between Government and Civil Society

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1. Zimbabwe’s Programme of Support to NAP for OVC An example of coordination between Government and Civil Society Roles and Responsibilities of Civil Society Organisations: How best to reach children affected by AIDS? Roeland Monasch 2 April, 2009 Amsterdam, The Netherlands Thank you organizers to provide opportunity to share the Zimbabwe experience in scaling up OVC response by strengthening coordination between Government & CSOs The presentation gives an overview how over the past three years coordination of NGO and state-run services in Zimbabwe have been improved.Thank you organizers to provide opportunity to share the Zimbabwe experience in scaling up OVC response by strengthening coordination between Government & CSOs The presentation gives an overview how over the past three years coordination of NGO and state-run services in Zimbabwe have been improved.

2. Outline Situation of OVC in Zimbabwe Programming environment in Zimbabwe The “Programme of Support to the NAP for OVC” 5 Components contributing to successful coordination between Government & CSOs Complementary role of Government & CSOs in New Zimbabwe

3. Situation of OVC in Zimbabwe Now let me share with you the Zimbabwean Experience in improving the coordination of NGO and state-run services. To start off a quick snap shot of the OVC situation in Zimbabwe. Nearly a quarter of the children under 18 have lost one or both parents making it one of the three most affected countries in the world. = 1.3 million children lost one or both parents. Orphans are less likely to: attend school access health care and other basic services. Orphans are more likely to: have psychological problems be subjected to forced sex in adolescence, increasing their vulnerability to HIV. Now let me share with you the Zimbabwean Experience in improving the coordination of NGO and state-run services. To start off a quick snap shot of the OVC situation in Zimbabwe. Nearly a quarter of the children under 18 have lost one or both parents making it one of the three most affected countries in the world. = 1.3 million children lost one or both parents. Orphans are less likely to: attend school access health care and other basic services. Orphans are more likely to: have psychological problems be subjected to forced sex in adolescence, increasing their vulnerability to HIV.

4. OVC Context in Zimbabwe Adult HIV Prevalence – 15.6% (Down from 25%). Increasing vulnerability due to economic collapse. Annual Inflation – 2.790.000.000.000.000.000 % Nearly 7 Million people on Food Aid (March ’09) Collapse of Basic Social Services Delivery System Difficult policy environment – but good on HIV. Relatively small number of donors. Unwillingness for many donors to fund government directly Majority of funding is humanitarian/ short-term and unpredictable. Large number of civil society initiatives but co-ordination poor. A quintillion is a figure with 18 zeros and is ranked above a quadrillion The humanitarian situation in Zimbabwe continues to be impacted by a set of complex, overlapping and often worsening economic and social factors. Spiralling inflation, deteriorating physical infrastructure, the inability of the public sector to deliver basic social services, and the severe impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic have led to a decline in the overall health and well-being of the population. The erosion of livelihoods, food insecurity, rising malnutrition and the possibility of disease outbreaks are putting the already vulnerable population under further distress. A quintillion is a figure with 18 zeros and is ranked above a quadrillion The humanitarian situation in Zimbabwe continues to be impacted by a set of complex, overlapping and often worsening economic and social factors. Spiralling inflation, deteriorating physical infrastructure, the inability of the public sector to deliver basic social services, and the severe impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic have led to a decline in the overall health and well-being of the population. The erosion of livelihoods, food insecurity, rising malnutrition and the possibility of disease outbreaks are putting the already vulnerable population under further distress.

5. Need for improved coordination… This slide present the situation with regard of NGO coordination 3 years ago. Despite the fact that Zimbabwe had a NAP for OVC there was very little coordination and collaboration between different actors involved in the national OVC response. There are three important characteristics of the pre-2006 Zimbabwean OVC response: 1-While government was leading the NAP for OVC and had its own programmes there were no linkages with the NGO response; 2-NGOs did not coordinate among themselves and often were supporting the same FBO/CBOs and competing for donor money; 3-Donors were providing assistance in an uncoordinated, haphazard way leading to high overhead costs and heavy reporting burden for NGOs + Government was not aware what donors were supporting. As a result limited funds were reaching the communities. As you can see on the slide there are much more lines at the top part of the graph (expensive lines) compared to lines at the bottom of the slide reaching the communities (cheaper lines). This slide present the situation with regard of NGO coordination 3 years ago. Despite the fact that Zimbabwe had a NAP for OVC there was very little coordination and collaboration between different actors involved in the national OVC response. There are three important characteristics of the pre-2006 Zimbabwean OVC response: 1-While government was leading the NAP for OVC and had its own programmes there were no linkages with the NGO response; 2-NGOs did not coordinate among themselves and often were supporting the same FBO/CBOs and competing for donor money; 3-Donors were providing assistance in an uncoordinated, haphazard way leading to high overhead costs and heavy reporting burden for NGOs + Government was not aware what donors were supporting. As a result limited funds were reaching the communities. As you can see on the slide there are much more lines at the top part of the graph (expensive lines) compared to lines at the bottom of the slide reaching the communities (cheaper lines).

6. However, Zimbabwe was among the first African countries to recognize that AIDS could have catastrophic consequences on the country's development and took action relatively early on a national level to confront the growing crisis. Zimbabwe already developed an OVC policy in 1999. In 2004 it developed a National Action Plan for OVC. Zimbawe like other countries in its region also did a RAAAP, Costed it’s NAP and developed M&E indicators. However, despite all the coordinated efforts at national level, actual coordination in implementation was limited.However, Zimbabwe was among the first African countries to recognize that AIDS could have catastrophic consequences on the country's development and took action relatively early on a national level to confront the growing crisis. Zimbabwe already developed an OVC policy in 1999. In 2004 it developed a National Action Plan for OVC. Zimbawe like other countries in its region also did a RAAAP, Costed it’s NAP and developed M&E indicators. However, despite all the coordinated efforts at national level, actual coordination in implementation was limited.

7. Harmonization – Programme of Support NAP for OVC Aim to provide increased, predictable and multi-year funding for OVC in fragile states context Improve efficiency and effectiveness of fund flows Improve co-ordination (avoid gaps/duplication) Build on knowledge “What works” Aim to provide increased, predictable and multi-year funding for OVC in fragile states context Improve efficiency and effectiveness of fund flows Improve co-ordination (avoid gaps/duplication) Build on knowledge “What works”

8. The “programme of support” How does it work? Donors pool funds in one account (US$ 85 Million) Civil Society Organisations apply for funds Technical Review Committee (GoZ, NAC, donors and UNICEF) select partners –> 32 partners /150 sub-Grantees Tripartite agreements signed between Ministry of Public Service, UNICEF and NGOs Organisations report to both MPSLSW and UNICEF (donors) To date 200,000 children reached - Potential = 400,000 OVC

9. Many challenges: Budgeting with 8 million % inflation! Restrictions on NGOs Scaling up – absorptive capacity NGOs Minimum standards of interventions Co-ordination with non pooling donors and Foundations Child participation There are five components of the programme that have been important to ensure a more successful coordination between Government & NGOs delivery of services.Many challenges: Budgeting with 8 million % inflation! Restrictions on NGOs Scaling up – absorptive capacity NGOs Minimum standards of interventions Co-ordination with non pooling donors and Foundations Child participation There are five components of the programme that have been important to ensure a more successful coordination between Government & NGOs delivery of services.

10. Mapping: Who does what and where? An OVC Intervention Atlas was developed to map activities of all organizations providing support to OVC at Provincial, District and Ward level by organization and type of intervention. The tool is useful in planning, and coordination of interventions.Mapping: Who does what and where? An OVC Intervention Atlas was developed to map activities of all organizations providing support to OVC at Provincial, District and Ward level by organization and type of intervention. The tool is useful in planning, and coordination of interventions.

11. Funding Proposals by NGOs were standardized. Partners were asked to fit their activities within the NAP for OVC. The standard application tool provided much more transparency on costs and with the Intervention Atlas it was easier to identify priority areas/proposals among the applicants. Funding Proposals by NGOs were standardized. Partners were asked to fit their activities within the NAP for OVC. The standard application tool provided much more transparency on costs and with the Intervention Atlas it was easier to identify priority areas/proposals among the applicants.

12. Donors have been active throughout the entire development of the programme. Through the OECD-OVC Donor Group donor activities are harmonized. A more detailed presentation on Donor Harmonization for OVC will be presented tomorrow by my colleague Rachel Yates from DFID.Donors have been active throughout the entire development of the programme. Through the OECD-OVC Donor Group donor activities are harmonized. A more detailed presentation on Donor Harmonization for OVC will be presented tomorrow by my colleague Rachel Yates from DFID.

13. A capacity assessment of over 68 partners was assessed with a standardized tool. All organizations scored highest in the domain of finance and human resources. The lowest scores were in the domain of technical knowledge and skills, and child participation. The results of the assessments have been used for a comprehensive capacity Building plan.A capacity assessment of over 68 partners was assessed with a standardized tool. All organizations scored highest in the domain of finance and human resources. The lowest scores were in the domain of technical knowledge and skills, and child participation. The results of the assessments have been used for a comprehensive capacity Building plan.

14. Capacity Assessment among 60 CSOs (Intermediaries & Sub-Grantees) Interesting findings: High and Low performance Explain MIN – MEDIAN – MAX Items assessed: (1) Governance; (2) Organizational Culture; (3) Project Design & Management; (4) Finance, Human Resources, Administration; (5) Technical knowledge/skills; (6) Intermediary responsibilities. OVC Technical knowledge scored lowestCapacity Assessment among 60 CSOs (Intermediaries & Sub-Grantees) Interesting findings: High and Low performance Explain MIN – MEDIAN – MAX Items assessed: (1) Governance; (2) Organizational Culture; (3) Project Design & Management; (4) Finance, Human Resources, Administration; (5) Technical knowledge/skills; (6) Intermediary responsibilities. OVC Technical knowledge scored lowest

15. A single M&E system was implemented. Activities implemented under the Programme are routinely monitored through an M&E system which is fully harmonized with the national HIV/AIDS M&E system. The data collected through the system is compiled only once per organization but used by District, Provincial, and National Authorities as well used for progress monitoring by NGOs and donor report compiled by UNICEF.A single M&E system was implemented. Activities implemented under the Programme are routinely monitored through an M&E system which is fully harmonized with the national HIV/AIDS M&E system. The data collected through the system is compiled only once per organization but used by District, Provincial, and National Authorities as well used for progress monitoring by NGOs and donor report compiled by UNICEF.

16. Evidence - Does it make a difference? Evidence that the improved coordination of NGO and state-run services through the PoS is making a difference is four-fold: 1-More funds have become available for NGOs 2-The average cost/child intervention has reduced significantly 3-The number of children assisted as significantly increased 4-The OVC Effort Index shows a significant improvement in areas addressed by coordination (Consultative Process; Coordination Mechanisms; and M&E) 5-Government has for the first time a clear picture of OVC activities in the country and is able to coordinate and report on progress The overall impact will be assessed early 2009 through a National OVC SurveyEvidence that the improved coordination of NGO and state-run services through the PoS is making a difference is four-fold: 1-More funds have become available for NGOs 2-The average cost/child intervention has reduced significantly 3-The number of children assisted as significantly increased 4-The OVC Effort Index shows a significant improvement in areas addressed by coordination (Consultative Process; Coordination Mechanisms; and M&E) 5-Government has for the first time a clear picture of OVC activities in the country and is able to coordinate and report on progress The overall impact will be assessed early 2009 through a National OVC Survey

17. Last part of this presentation is related to the role of Government & NGOs in New Zimbabwe Currently 85% of OVC support comes from either communities directly or CSOs – With a new Government probably able to fundraise and develop activties for the most vulnerable there is a need to find the right balance of support for state and non-state delivery mechanisms in NEW ZIMBABWE If we take the JILCA Report as starting point – There are 4 key lines of action that will need to be delivered for better results for children affected by HIV/AIDS. Last part of this presentation is related to the role of Government & NGOs in New Zimbabwe Currently 85% of OVC support comes from either communities directly or CSOs – With a new Government probably able to fundraise and develop activties for the most vulnerable there is a need to find the right balance of support for state and non-state delivery mechanisms in NEW ZIMBABWE If we take the JILCA Report as starting point – There are 4 key lines of action that will need to be delivered for better results for children affected by HIV/AIDS.

18. Last part of this presentation is related to the role of Government & NGOs in New Zimbabwe Currently 85% of OVC support comes from either communities directly or CSOs – With a new Government probably able to fundraise and develop activties for the most vulnerable there is a need to find the right balance of support for state and non-state delivery mechanisms in NEW ZIMBABWE If we take the JILCA Report as starting point – There are 4 key lines of action that will need to be delivered for better results for children affected by HIV/AIDS. 1-Providing support for children to and through their families GOZ: Provision of ARVs CSO: Home based Care GOZ: Keep children in school (BEAM) CSO: Get children back to school Last part of this presentation is related to the role of Government & NGOs in New Zimbabwe Currently 85% of OVC support comes from either communities directly or CSOs – With a new Government probably able to fundraise and develop activties for the most vulnerable there is a need to find the right balance of support for state and non-state delivery mechanisms in NEW ZIMBABWE If we take the JILCA Report as starting point – There are 4 key lines of action that will need to be delivered for better results for children affected by HIV/AIDS. 1-Providing support for children to and through their families GOZ: Provision of ARVs CSO: Home based Care GOZ: Keep children in school (BEAM) CSO: Get children back to school

19. 2-Strengthening community support for families GoZ: Establish & coordinate Rural District Councils and lower level structures CSO: Empower communities – Cap. Bld. using ‘rights-based’ approach2-Strengthening community support for families GoZ: Establish & coordinate Rural District Councils and lower level structures CSO: Empower communities – Cap. Bld. using ‘rights-based’ approach

20. 3-Reducing family poverty GoZ: Establishing national “Social Protection” mechanism CSO: Innovation – pilot programmes: Cash Transfer etc.3-Reducing family poverty GoZ: Establishing national “Social Protection” mechanism CSO: Innovation – pilot programmes: Cash Transfer etc.

21. 4-Delivering integrated family-centred services (Health, Education, Social Welfare) G: Register Children CSO: Facilitate registration (Transport) G: Regulation Social Welfare Officers CSO: Engage Protection Officers as Social Welfare officers 4-Delivering integrated family-centred services (Health, Education, Social Welfare) G: Register Children CSO: Facilitate registration (Transport) G: Regulation Social Welfare Officers CSO: Engage Protection Officers as Social Welfare officers

22. CONCLUDE: These different roles in service delivery are complementary and to be efficient they need to be well coordinatedCONCLUDE: These different roles in service delivery are complementary and to be efficient they need to be well coordinated

23. Thank you

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